The Crowfield Curse

The Crowfield Curse

4.1 6
by Pat Walsh
     
 

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*"A wondrous mystery." --Kirkus, starred review

*"Suspenseful and spooky...with an edgy battle between good and evil." --School Library Journal, starred review

If the deepest secret has been spoken, can the deadliest curse be broken?

Sent into the forest to gather firewood for the medieval abbey where he's an apprentice, Will hears a cry for help, and comes

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Overview


*"A wondrous mystery." --Kirkus, starred review

*"Suspenseful and spooky...with an edgy battle between good and evil." --School Library Journal, starred review

If the deepest secret has been spoken, can the deadliest curse be broken?

Sent into the forest to gather firewood for the medieval abbey where he's an apprentice, Will hears a cry for help, and comes upon a creature no bigger than a cat. Trapped and wounded, it's a hobgoblin, who confesses a horrible secret: Something is buried deep in the snow, just beyond the graveyard. A mythical being, doomed by an ancient curse...

What does this mystery have to do with the cryptic brotherhood of monks Will serves? What does it have to do with the boy himself? When two cloaked figures darken the church's doorway and start demanding answers, Will is drawn into a dangerous world of Old Magic.

*Includes a timetable of daily life in the abbey, a glossary of monastic terms, and a sneak peek at the chilling sequel THE CROWFIELD DEMON!

New York Public Library "100 Best Books for Reading and Sharing"

A 2011 USBBY Outstanding International Book

Shortlisted for the Branford Boase Award

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

PRAISE FOR THE CROWFIELD CURSE

*"Walsh described the environment with calm sensory detail, giving readers a palpably damp, frigid winter. Understatedly tender and mystical yet solid." -- Kirkus, starred review

*"Suspenseful and spooky. With fascinating attention to detail and an edgy battle between evil and good, Walsh sweeps readers almost effortlessly into another time and place. By the close of the novel, readers are hoping for more, and the ending suggests that more is to come. " -- School Library Journal, starred review

"Walsh writes with a sure and steady hand, deftly blending the historical details of medieval monastery life with the magical elements of the mythical supernatural creatures. The hob, with his unintentional wit and well-timed comic relief, is the true standout of the cast. The growing tension will compel young readers toward the climactic battle in the woods and its terrifying conclusion." -- Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Dotted with evil curses, dead angels, and dark places. Walsh expertly mixes the fantastical with the humdrum necessities of medieval life." -- Booklist

*Includes a timetable of daily life in the abbey and a glossary of monastic terms

*Plus a sneak peek at the sequel THE CROWFIELD DEMON!

A 2011 USBBY Outstanding International Book

A CBC {TK FROM LIBRARY MKTG}

New York Public Library's "100 Titles for Reading and Sharing"

Kirkus "Best Book of the Year"

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*THE CROWFIELD CURSE
Author: Walsh, Pat
In 1347 at a country monastery, a wondrous mystery unfolds. Collecting firewood in a frozen forest, William finds an unfamiliar cat-sized creature wounded in an animal trap. It moans but also talks, so despite his neck hairs hackling at this incomprehensible being, William brings the hob home to the single sympathetic monk at Crowfield Abbey. As a servant, William's treated badly there, but he makes do, and Brother Snail is kind. The dignified but privately vulnerable hob is only the first new thing in William's world. A wealthy leper, a cold fay warrior and rumors of a dead angel pull William into grave danger–danger he witnesses in a bloody slaughter of woodland animals. Some evil is overt while some is difficult to identify, but William has a careful mind and a gentle core that serve him well. Walsh describes the environment with calm sensory detail, giving readers a palpably damp, frigid winter (though the abbey buildings could have used a diagram). Understatedly tender and mystical yet solid; it ends in temporary peace, with sequel potential. (daily abbey schedule, glossary) (Historical fantasy. 9-12) -- Kirkus, starred review

School Library Journal – September 2010
*WALSH, Pat. The Crowfield Curse. 336p. glossary. Scholastic/Chicken House. Sept. 2010. Tr $16.99. ISBN 978-0-545-22922-7. LC number unavailable.
Gr 5-8–Set in England in the winter of 1347, this suspenseful and spooky story will thrill readers who loved Joseph Delaney's “The Last Apprentice” series (HarperCollins). Fourteen-year-old William, whose family perished in a fire 18 months earlier, works as a servant at the local monastery in exchange for his room and board, meager as it is. While gathering firewood, he discovers a creature caught in a trap and saves its life. The hobgoblin tells him that he can only be seen by those with the Sight, a gift the boy did not know he possessed. As the hob recovers from his wounds, Will encounters a mystery that shakes him to his core. There is an angel secretly buried in the nearby woodlands, and a visitor to the abbey, a leper, is determined to find it. For reasons unclear to the boy, Mr. Bone ins

Children's Literature - Cynthia Levinson
William, who serves a brotherhood of monks at Crowfield Abbey, discovers a hob, a talking cat-like creature, trapped in the nearby woods. He frees the hob and carries it to a monk who heals it, then throws the trap into the pool at the bottom of Whistling Hollow, the unholy valley where locals claim to hear disembodied whistling that calls the Wild Hunt—and where Will thinks he hears whispering threats. While caring for the hob, nicknamed Brother Walter to protect him from the other monks, Will learns about the magical world of the fay and, because of Walter's questions, begins to wonder about the rationality of his own world. Other creatures—animal, human, and mystical, as well as some that can shift their shapes among these and others, including the hob, who can become invisible—confront and unsettle Will. He is especially undone when he realizes he will have to enter the Hollow to find the grave of an angel who has died mysteriously. On his quests, Will realizes that he is different from other people, for he has the Sight, which protects him but which also marks him for special duties. Set in a land that is vaguely familiar and in a period that seems both medieval and timeless, the story conveys a creepy, though not terrifying, atmosphere. Readers who seek chills, fantasy, and mystery will enjoy this story. Creating a consistent and whole universe, the book helpfully concludes with a timetable of daily life at the abbey and a glossary of terms. Reviewer: Cynthia Levinson
School Library Journal
Gr 5�8—Set in England in the winter of 1347, this suspenseful and spooky story will thrill readers who loved Joseph Delaney's "The Last Apprentice" series (HarperCollins). Fourteen-year-old William, whose family perished in a fire 18 months earlier, works as a servant at the local monastery in exchange for his room and board, meager as it is. While gathering firewood, he discovers a creature caught in a trap and saves its life. The hobgoblin tells him that he can only be seen by those with the Sight, a gift the boy did not know he possessed. As the hob recovers from his wounds, Will encounters a mystery that shakes him to his core. There is an angel secretly buried in the nearby woodlands, and a visitor to the abbey, a leper, is determined to find it. For reasons unclear to the boy, Mr. Bone insists that Will help accomplish this goal. With fascinating attention to detail and an edgy battle between evil and good, Walsh sweeps readers almost effortlessly into another time and place. By the close of the novel, they are hoping for more, and the ending suggests that more is to come. A time table of daily life in the abbey and a glossary of monastic terms are included.—Kathy Kirchoefer, Prince Georges County Memorial Library System, New Carrollton, MD
Kirkus Reviews

In 1347 at a country monastery, a wondrous mystery unfolds. Collecting firewood in a frozen forest, William finds an unfamiliar cat-sized creature wounded in an animal trap. It moans but also talks, so despite his neck hairs hackling at this incomprehensible being, William brings the hob home to the single sympathetic monk at Crowfield Abbey. As a servant, William's treated badly there, but he makes do, and Brother Snail is kind. The dignified but privately vulnerable hob is only the first new thing in William's world. A wealthy leper, a cold fay warrior and rumors of a dead angel pull William into grave danger—danger he witnesses in a bloody slaughter of woodland animals. Some evil is overt while some is difficult to identify, but William has a careful mind and a gentle core that serve him well. Walsh describes the environment with calm sensory detail, giving readers a palpably damp, frigid winter (though the abbey buildings could have used a diagram). Understatedly tender and mystical yet solid; it ends in temporary peace, with sequel potential. (daily abbey schedule, glossary) (Historical fantasy. 9-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545231039
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2012
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
880,037
Product dimensions:
5.32(w) x 8.52(h) x 0.86(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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