Crush / Edition 1

Crush / Edition 1

4.8 5
by Richard Siken
     
 

ISBN-10: 0300107897

ISBN-13: 9780300107890

Pub. Date: 03/11/2005

Publisher: Yale University Press

Richard Siken’s Crush, selected as the 2004 winner of the Yale Younger Poets prize, is a powerful collection of poems driven by obsession and love. Siken writes with ferocity, and his reader hurtles unstoppably with him. His poetry is confessional, gay, savage, and charged with violent eroticism. In the world of American poetry, Siken's voice is

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Overview

Richard Siken’s Crush, selected as the 2004 winner of the Yale Younger Poets prize, is a powerful collection of poems driven by obsession and love. Siken writes with ferocity, and his reader hurtles unstoppably with him. His poetry is confessional, gay, savage, and charged with violent eroticism. In the world of American poetry, Siken's voice is striking.
In her introduction to the book, competition judge Louise Glück hails the “cumulative, driving, apocalyptic power, [and] purgatorial recklessness” of Siken’s poems. She notes, “Books of this kind dream big. . . . They restore to poetry that sense of crucial moment and crucial utterance which may indeed be the great genius of the form.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300107890
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
03/11/2005
Series:
Yale Series of Younger Poets
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
127,705
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 7.54(h) x 0.20(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Scheherazade3
Dirty valentine4
Little beast5
Seaside improvisation8
The torn-up road9
Litany in which certain things are crossed out11
Visible world19
Boot theory20
A primer for the small weird loves22
Unfinished duet26
I had a dream about you28
Straw house, straw dog31
Saying your names33
Planet of love39
Wishbone40
Driving, not washing42
Road music44
The dislocated room46
You are Jeff50
Meanwhile59
Snow and dirty rain60

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Crush 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can reread and reread this book over and over again. I quote it all the time. It's kind of dark and twisted but that is how life is. So yeah.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I have ever read. Siken writes with a touch of eloquence that's hard to find these days in poets. Every poem is amazing and each lines delivers a message. Beautiful writing and I recommend it to all: "You're in a car with a beautiful boy, and you're trying to tell him that you love him, and you're trying to choke down the feeling, and you're trembling, but he reaches over and he touches you, like a prayer for which no words exist, and you feel your heart taking root in your body, like you've discovered something you don't even have a name for." - You Are Jeff
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tamesthetic More than 1 year ago
This book is so rich in evil love. Richard Siken is like a way better Stephanie Meyer without the fangs but with blood and soul. It's like reading for the first time. I can't describe it. It's see seeing into someone's soul, foul and beautiful, painful and tender. I'd give this book 10 stars if I had it. I can't even imagine how he will top himself. This book is a show-stopper.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sorry- I'm still speechless and jealous that this voice did not come from my own mind. Wow. So real - so right-the-hell now - so totally twisted yet identifiable and not at all gruesome. Did I already say wow? I am reading it slowly for the second time and it feels like I'm seeing it all for the first time. Deliscious- like a bite-into-a fleshy-dirty-sweet fruit -deliscious. I love it!!!!!!!!!! What is the limit on exclamation points - I need to exceed it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Awesome piece of art. It's like all the words you realize you should have said- all the ways you could express sarcasm and - Wowz. I'm sorry - I feel retarded after reading this - like my own words are no good anymore. Louise Gluck wrote the foreword with equal difficulty. In order to speak about the book or describe it - you become tempted to quote the entire book. The only true description of the book is the book itself.