CSS Pocket Reference

CSS Pocket Reference

4.0 7
by Eric A. Meyer
     
 

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When you're working with CSS and need a quick answer, CSS Pocket Reference delivers. This handy, concise book provides all of the essential information you need to implement CSS on the fly. Ideal for intermediate to advanced web designers and developers, the 4th edition is revised and updated for CSS3, the latest version of the Cascading Style Sheet

Overview

When you're working with CSS and need a quick answer, CSS Pocket Reference delivers. This handy, concise book provides all of the essential information you need to implement CSS on the fly. Ideal for intermediate to advanced web designers and developers, the 4th edition is revised and updated for CSS3, the latest version of the Cascading Style Sheet specification. Along with a complete alphabetical reference to CSS3 selectors and properties, you'll also find a short introduction to the key concepts of CSS.

Based on Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide, this reference is an easy-to-use cheatsheet of the CSS specifications you need for any task at hand. This book helps you:

  • Quickly find and adapt the style elements you need
  • Learn how CSS3 features complement and extend your CSS practices
  • Discover new value types and new CSS selectors
  • Implement drop shadows, multiple backgrounds, rounded corners, and border images
  • Get new information about transforms and transitions

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449313050
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/12/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
252
Sales rank:
955,072
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Eric A. Meyer is an internationally recognized expert, author, and speaker on HTML, CSS, and web standards, and the founder of Complex Spiral Consulting (www.complexspiral.com). In addition to writing numerous books on CSS, Eric created the CSS Browser Compatibility Charts and coordinated the authoring and creation of the W3C's official CSS Test Suite.

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CSS Pocket Reference 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Extremely helpful and easy to understand
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of O'Reilly's 'Pocket Reference' books and this one was no disappointment. In fact, this guide by Eric Meyer is exceptionally well written with clear explanations of CSS terminology. The first few sections on rules, precedence, positioning, layouts, etc. helped me - fairly new to CSS - grasp the gist of CSS better than more extensive tutorials because of Meyer's concise explanations and well-conceived illustrations. Of course, the long-term value of these reference books is the alphabetical list of terms with definitions, applications, syntax and examples. As with the other Pocket Reference books, a beginner should not come to this book for an introduction to CSS. There are many great books (some by Meyer) and web sites that get you up and running quickly. But even the beginner will find this invaluable as a quick reference book throughout the learning process. I keep it right next to my screen when doing any web work. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Eric Meyer is a respected name where CSS is concerned and his books on CSS are well-regarded. This pocket guide, however, does not meet his usual high standard. The main failing is the lack of information on CSS Level 2. Even though the guide is a few years old, all the important information about CSS2 was available at the time, making its omission in a pocket guide peculiar. The other failing is poor typesetting, making the entry for individual properties hard to see and thus hard to find. This problem is magnified because there is no index, so finding a given item is a hit or miss proposition. I expect a pocket reference to be complete and efficient. O'Reilly misses the boat with this one.