Ctrl Alt Delete: Reboot Your Business. Reboot Your Life. Your Future Depends on It.

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Overview

Just a few years ago, all you or your company needed was a modest website and a toll-free 800 number. Those days are, of course, long gone. Keeping your customers and clients happy - and trying to attract new ones - demands an entirely new and innovative approach to online commerce.

Mitch Joel, one of the world's leading experts in this area, warns that the time has come to hit the CTRL ALT DEL buttons on your computer, and to start building your e-commerce platform and business...

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Ctrl Alt Delete: Reboot Your Business. Reboot Your Life. Your Future Depends on It.

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Overview

Just a few years ago, all you or your company needed was a modest website and a toll-free 800 number. Those days are, of course, long gone. Keeping your customers and clients happy - and trying to attract new ones - demands an entirely new and innovative approach to online commerce.

Mitch Joel, one of the world's leading experts in this area, warns that the time has come to hit the CTRL ALT DEL buttons on your computer, and to start building your e-commerce platform and business model from scratch. If you don't, Joel warns, not only will your company begin to slide backwards, but you might find yourself unemployable within five years.

That's a very strong warning, but in his new book, Joel explains the convergence of five key factors that are changing online business forever. He outlines what you need to know to adapt right now. He also points to the seven triggers that will help you take advantage of these game-changing factors.

Along the way, Joel introduces his novel concept of "squiggle" which explains how you can learn to adapt your personal approach to your career as new technology comes down the pike.

In short, this is not a book about "change management" but rather a book about "changing both you AND your business model."

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Digital marketing guru Joel (Six Pixels of Separation) adds his voice to the crowded field of experts who claim to know how people and companies need to change. Joel's advice is to reboot: companies must reboot their businesses and employees must reboot how they do their jobs. In the book's first half, Joel addresses five major movements taking place in the business arena and explores how these movements require new ways of working. While Joel's assessment and prescriptions may be on target, his ideas are not necessarily novel. His first movement is the well-established shift toward direct relationships with consumers. However, his frank assessment of Mobile Apps, utility marketing, and his prescription of adding value reveal useful truths. For the individual reboot, Joel focuses on seven triggers—a combination of skills, attitudes, and perspectives needed to become "an invaluable employee or entrepreneur." Triggers include thinking with a good digital-first posture and marketing yourself. While there are golden nuggets ready to be extracted here, readers will need to sift through many already accepted ideas to find tthem. (May)
From the Publisher
"In CTRL ALT Delete, Mitch Joel surveys the ways technology has transformed how brands and businesses create, connect, and adapt to a shifting new landscape. This book — and especially the five new movements he identifies that are forcing brands to reboot — is an indispensable read for a time when so much is in transition."

— Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of the Huffington Post Media Group

"In CTRL ALT DELETE, Mitch Joel describes how you must learn to adapt, to learn, and to stay ahead of the curve online. This book will help prepare you for the future... now!"

— Tony Hsieh, NY Times Bestselling author of "Delivering Happiness" and CEO of Zappos.com, Inc.

"Writing with his signature blend of warmth and intelligence, in CTRL ALT Delete Mitch Joel delivers a crucial blueprint for running your business — with humane intention and razor-sharp results."

- Susan Cain, author of QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking.

"Too many brands, in their frantic effort to fashion a new business strategy, fail to build meaningful relationships with the customers they serve. Even fewer understand the new business landscape as it is (not as it once was). They need to listen to Mitch Joel. CTRL ALT DELETE is a wise and practical road map that can help you navigate today's challenging economic, social, physical and digital landscape."

— Daniel H. Pink, author of TO SELL IS HUMAN and DRIVE

The way we work and do business is changing faster than most of us understand or can comprehend. Fortunately Mitch Joel has given us CTRL ALT Delete, a wonderful book full of his invaluable insight to help us navigate, adapt and survive these fundamental changes.

— Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University, and author of Predictably Irrational

"In Control Alt Delete, Mitch Joel shows us that in times of great uncertainty — like ours — flexibility, creativity, authenticity, and kindness are the keys to developing great businesses - and ourselves. His book is a wonderful guide through the new terrain."

— Julie Burstein, author of Spark: How Creativity Works

"In a world filled with broken promises, Mitch Joel is the real deal. He lives the work he talks about, and he does it with generosity and insight."

Seth Godin
Bestselling author
The Icarus Deception

From the Publisher

"In CTRL ALT Delete, Mitch Joel surveys the ways technology has transformed how brands and businesses create, connect, and adapt to a shifting new landscape. This book -- and especially the five new movements he identifies that are forcing brands to reboot -- is an indispensable read for a time when so much is in transition."

-- Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of the Huffington Post Media Group

"In CTRL ALT DELETE, Mitch Joel describes how you must learn to adapt, to learn, and to stay ahead of the curve online. This book will help prepare you for the future... now!"

-- Tony Hsieh, NY Times Bestselling author of "Delivering Happiness" and CEO of Zappos.com, Inc.

"Writing with his signature blend of warmth and intelligence, in CTRL ALT Delete Mitch Joel delivers a crucial blueprint for running your business -- with humane intention and razor-sharp results."

- Susan Cain, author of QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking.

"Too many brands, in their frantic effort to fashion a new business strategy, fail to build meaningful relationships with the customers they serve. Even fewer understand the new business landscape as it is (not as it once was). They need to listen to Mitch Joel. CTRL ALT DELETE is a wise and practical road map that can help you navigate today's challenging economic, social, physical and digital landscape."

-- Daniel H. Pink, author of TO SELL IS HUMAN and DRIVE

The way we work and do business is changing faster than most of us understand or can comprehend. Fortunately Mitch Joel has given us CTRL ALT Delete, a wonderful book full of his invaluable insight to help us navigate, adapt and survive these fundamental changes.

-- Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University, and author of Predictably Irrational

"In Control Alt Delete, Mitch Joel shows us that in times of great uncertainty -- like ours -- flexibility, creativity, authenticity, and kindness are the keys to developing great businesses - and ourselves. His book is a wonderful guide through the new terrain."

-- Julie Burstein, author of Spark: How Creativity Works

"In a world filled with broken promises, Mitch Joel is the real deal. He lives the work he talks about, and he does it with generosity and insight."

Seth Godin
Bestselling author
The Icarus Deception

Library Journal
12/01/2013
Joel (president, Twist Image) positions himself as a guide for both businesses and individuals as they navigate what he calls a current "purgatory" state of rapidly changing technology and swirling social media. He expands on concepts that will be familiar to readers of marketing literature: consumers want direct business relationships, utility, and added value; businesses need a balance of passive and active media; big data expands a company's knowledge of its customers while raising privacy concerns. Likewise, other books have featured his examples of success: Apple, Zappos, and Kickstarter and other crowdsourced funding. The reader is encouraged to think entrepreneurially, to change careers bravely, and to self-market enthusiastically. Much of the information provided here has been covered elsewhere but perhaps not as succinctly. And for those nervous about embracing the concept of the "squiggle," which instructs readers on how to approach their career from a personal angle as new technology becomes the norm, Joel's passion for purgatory might win new converts. VERDICT Recommended for comprehensive public library collections.—Heidi Senior, Univ. of Portland Lib., OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455523306
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/21/2013
  • Pages: 276
  • Sales rank: 588,940
  • Product dimensions: 6.44 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Mitch Joel is President of Twist Image, an award-winning Digital Marketing and Communications company, which is based in Montreal with clients around the world.

Mitch was recently cited as Canada's Most Influential Male in Social Media, one of the top 10 online marketers in the world, and was selected as one of Canada's Top 40 under 40. His previous book for us was SIX PIXELS OF SEPARATION.

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Read an Excerpt

Ctrl Alt Delete

Reboot Your Business. Reboot Your Life. Your Future Depends on It.


By Mitch Joel

Grand Central Publishing

Copyright © 2013 Mitch Joel
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4555-2330-6


CHAPTER 1

From Me to You

The shift toward direct relationships with consumers.


Several years ago a leading brand (that shall remain nameless) contacted my marketing agency, Twist Image, about a new business opportunity in the digital space. The brand's reality was this: As the years passed by, they were discovering that the number of retailers they were selling to was diminishing at a rapid and terrifying pace.

As the major big-box outlets continue to grow and as consolidation rifles through the retail sector, the bigger brands have only a handful of outlets to sell their wares. Plus, with these retailers' size and growth comes another reality: They begin to dictate everything from quantity and terms to acceptable margins. For some businesses, this is a dream come true because it secures significant sales, but for others (like this brand), a massive global business was becoming a game of diminishing returns. They were selling to fewer stores at weakening margins. It got ugly fast if you ran the numbers: Eventually this brand would only have their products on the shelves of one or two of the major retailers, which would be constantly dictating and changing the terms of sale. Beyond that came the retailers' demands for either exclusivity, their own unique product lines, or both. At the end of the day, the brand/client came to a harsh realization: While they were a household name, they had no direct relationship with the consumer.


HOW DO YOU WIN?

The client's idea was to create a new e-commerce brand online that housed only their own brand-name products but would feel like a new online player. This was their last chance. While they constantly battled with retailers over the rights to sell their own products directly to consumers online, the time had come to draw a line in the sand. This project became the hope and prayer to save the business. They would use this online business as a place to start a direct relationship with the consumer.

Notwithstanding how the major retailers might have felt about this project—in terms of how it would not only cannibalize their business but perhaps keep customers away—it would have been a very smart and wise play for the brand to make. For a brand to truly shape its own destiny, it must lead the relationship with the consumer as well. I was fully behind this initiative ... so what happened? The company never pulled the trigger on their e-commerce project, and now they're busy scrambling for "likes" on Facebook and are selling their products through the handful of big-box retailers left. Ironically, other, scrappier startups have disrupted this traditional retail model with digital- only brands that are capturing the imagination (and money) of consumers all over the world.


WHAT APPLE KNOWS.

What happened prior to 2001 that made Apple go into the retail business? Whenever the topic of Apple and the Apple retail experience (aka Apple Store) is brought up, many media pundits roll their eyes as if the success of these sparse and crisp stores is some kind of anomaly in business lore. It's not. Apple came to a conclusion in the 1990s that many businesses have yet to wake up to. They knew that if potential customers walked into a traditional consumer electronics goods store and became inundated with a massive selection of computers and laptops, they would, instinctively, defer to the first sales associate they could wrestle down. What would happen next? Would the sales associates spend the time needed to uncover the needs of individual customers, or would they attempt to sell those same customers whatever was either on sale or would garner them the highest commission? I think we all know the answer to that question.

The solution for Apple was to create a "cradle to the grave" business model where the customer is—at every touch point—speaking directly with Apple's brand. A true, direct relationship—in every sense of the word. Apple could not win on price (their computers and other devices are usually much more expensive than their competition's), so they had to win by being there for the consumer and by making these consumers a part of a more complete brand ecosystem. Don't think for a second that the Genius Bar doesn't play directly into this very forward-thinking business strategy, which is driven by the power of direct relationships.

At the time that Apple first launched retail stores in 2001, the common practice among retailers was to cram each nook and cranny of space with merchandise to maximize the sales per square foot. Sadly, most retailers (and businesses) still hold on to this traditional thinking. For Apple, it was less about every square foot of retail space and much more about every square inch of the direct relationship. Apple didn't start in the retail business to compete with other consumer electronics stores; they went into retail for the direct relationship with their customers. Apple's attitude was: "Why give that power to Best Buy or anyone else?"


HOW ARE YOUR DIRECT RELATIONSHIPS?

Some brands do this well ... but most fail at it in spectacular fashion. Is it possible to be so judgmental? It is. One of the reasons I still enjoy the debate about the efficacy of social media marketing is that the majority of brands that struggle with the return on investment are comparing it with traditional push advertising, instead of treating it as an opportunity to have real interactions between real people (one of the core pillars of my first book, Six Pixels of Separation). A consumer who hits a "like" or "follow" button is opening up the perfect opportunity to have a direct relationship with a brand. If all the brand does is blast back impersonal offers and specials, it is simply not pushing toward direct relationships ... it's pushing toward broadcast advertising.


THIS ISN'T ABOUT SOCIAL MEDIA (ANYMORE) ... IT'S ABOUT MAKING YOUR BUSINESS MORE SOCIAL.

This is a very unique moment in time. It is not only a revolution in business—one that we will probably never again see in our lifetimes—but it is ours either to capitalize on or to squander. The truth is that most businesses are wasting this moment because they are unable to think and react through this purgatory. The next five years are going to be about these direct relationships. The next five years are going to be about how well a brand can actually change a relationship from one that looks at how many people are in their database (and how to target them more effectively with advertising messages) ... to one focusing on precisely who those individuals are and how the brand can make the connection with them even stronger.


THE STARS ARE ALIGNED.

We have the technology. We have the data. We have the new media channels and platforms. We have the opportunity to publish whatever we want—in text, images, audio, and video—instantly (and for free) to the world. What we do with this moment will be telling. It will also set the pace for everything that flows out of our businesses for the next decade.


NO DIRECT RELATIONSHIPS. NO FUTURE.

The true opportunity going forward is for your business to develop a direct relationship with your consumers. But there's a big challenge to this. It turns out that your competition is no longer just your traditional competitors, because suddenly joining the fray are your third-party resellers or anyone else who sells your products on your behalf. Confused? You should be.

The official Beats By Dre Facebook page has over five million people who have liked it (as of this writing). You can buy your Dre Beats Solo Headphones with ControlTalk from Target for about $180. Target has over twenty million likes on their Facebook page. Both Target and Beats By Dre are actively amping up their likes on Facebook. It's not a subtle, sit-back-and-relax type of play. They are both enthusiastically and actively fighting for every like and friend they can find (one aspect of direct relationship building).

What's a confused consumer to do? If I bought my Beats By Dre at Target, am I supposed to like the Beats By Dre Facebook page? The Target Facebook page? Both? The answer is: I don't know ... and that's the problem. To add to this confusion and complexity, we also can't ignore Facebook.

With well over a billion users, Facebook is an Internet unto itself. Not unlike other online social networks, there is a cost to being active on Facebook, and that cost is both the data and the direct relationship with your consumers. While Facebook continues to work more closely with businesses to help build this engagement, much like Las Vegas, what happens on Facebook stays on Facebook. If you have three thousand people who like your brand on Facebook, you can't pick them up (with all of their data, usage, and engagement) and take them over to your website.

In essence, Facebook actually owns the direct relationship with the consumer here; you're merely on their turf leveraging the consumer's activity. The Facebook value proposition to Wall Street is simple: We own the data and direct relationships with these hundreds of millions of people, and the value is in the data and the ability to put advertising on the pages of content that these people are creating and sharing (more on that in chapter 2).

And it's not just Facebook—it's everyone who allows you access to an audience online. If you're posting videos to YouTube and are lucky enough to be generating millions of views and positive reviews, what would happen if you suddenly started posting the videos only to your website? Where does the true community reside? While your company may be able to lure some of its audience over for a new video (or two), you will quickly come to the realization that YouTube is where the activity is. That is where the direct relationship lives.

You can see that it's a real horse race for that key direct relationship: There's your company; there are the clients that you sell through (or your value-added partnerships); there are the channels and platforms that you're engaging through ... and we still haven't even made our way down the competitive food chain to your true competitors.


CONSUMER-CENTRIC CAN'T JUST BE YOUR BUSINESS JARGON.

The best way to begin thinking about these direct relationships is to reboot your perspective. In the past year, I've shifted my presentations on digital media. I've moved them away (almost completely) from what businesses should be doing in the digital marketing space to focusing them 100 percent on what customers are actually doing—out in the wild. Don't misconstrue the term customer-focused to mean that I really care about the consumer (this is the traditional way of looking at business). Customer-focused in 2013 means looking at things as a consumer and not as a businessperson. It may sound overly simplified, but how we think about business during regular working hours is usually diametrically opposed to how we act as consumers. We'll instinctively ask in a boardroom, "Does anyone really download and use apps on their iPhone?," and later that week we'll spend our hard-earned dollars downloading apps and content to our smartphones. Instead, we should think like our true customers. We should start acting like them. Sadly, most brands are not thinking like their customers. Don't believe me? When you wake up in the morning, what's the first thing you grab? How long is it before you grab your iPhone? And yet most brands are still doing little to embrace this new consumer.


WHAT'S YOUR BUSINESS REALLY UP TO?

Your business needs to not only sense this urgency, but also realize this seismic shift in the battle for direct relationships. While some businesses are beginning to capitalize on this by recognizing the value that comes from these relationships, most are still using these channels as a form of broadcast advertising. It's almost as if businesses have become anesthetized because of their reliance in the past on using media channels as a gateway to the consumer.

In the pre-Internet media world, your business could not have a direct relationship with the consumer. If you wanted to let people in your city know about your products or services, you had to take out advertising (few were great at direct marketing). The value of traditional media was not in the high quality of content that they produced, but rather in the direct relationship they had with an audience because of the perceived value of the content to the consumer. Now, in this world where consumers are liking, friending, tweeting, and +1-ing brands, not only have the tables turned, but the game has completely changed. And yet, if you look at what the majority of brands are doing in these digital spheres, you will be stunned:

• They're asking consumers to "like" them on Facebook while few actually make an effort to connect to those individuals on their own spaces. Here's a hint: Instead of asking people to like your business, why doesn't your business start liking these people first?

• They're asking customers to subscribe to the RSS feeds of their blogs or share their content, while the brand editors spend zero time engaging in the comments on the blogs being created by their customers. Here's a hint: Be active on every blog that serves your industry. Don't expect everyone to come to you.

• They're looking for customers to follow them on Twitter, but don't actually push beyond their own tweetstream to build affinity and loyalty. Here's a hint: If your Twitter feed is nothing but announcements about your sales or service upgrades and nobody is retweeting or sharing your content, it may be time to start thinking about adapting your content strategy (more on that in chapter 9).

• They're asking customers to watch their videos on YouTube, but few brands are doing anything unique on this channel. It's mostly their traditional advertising or longer versions of TV ads. Hint: The Web isn't a receptacle for your TV ads and corporate videos. Get creative! You can show real demos, answer real questions, and give customers a sneak peek into what you're planning. What's better: begging for views or having people willfully share your content?


CREATE A NEW SCENARIO ...

Many businesses create personas. These personas are fictional people who represent the "typical" customer. Most businesses have multiple personas because it's hard to pigeonhole people. These personas wind up being deep-dives into not only who these people are (demographics and psychographics), but also how they buy. The problem with the majority of the "how they buy" scenarios attached to these personas is that they have traditionally been very linear.

Here's some new "fiction" for you: Sophie needs a new pair of sunglasses. She goes online and does some research. She posts some options up on Facebook and asks her friends on Twitter and Pinterest to check them out and help her decide. Then she heads down to the store (if she hasn't already made the purchase online) to buy the sunglasses. Sounds realistic and simple enough, doesn't it? It's only half of the story.

Let's try that story again. Here's some nonfiction for you: Sophie needs a new pair of sunglasses. She does some online research (reads some peer-based reviews), posts some options on Facebook and Pinterest, and tweets them up. Her friend Rachel sees the tweet, and they text each other about heading over to the mall together. While strolling through the mall, not only are they both chatting to each other, but they're connected. They're responding to text messages, they're being alerted to Facebook and Twitter updates, they're laughing at posts, and—maybe—they're even checking in with foursquare (or some other location-based online social network) to see who else is around to join the outing (OMG, Lianna is already here at the mall!). While in the store, they notice a couple of other glasses, they snap some pictures and post them, but then a question comes up about the materials that were used to make the glasses. Sophie and Rachel do some quick online searches ... nothing. They realize that the brand is on Twitter so they ask the brand directly ... and so the story goes.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from Ctrl Alt Delete by Mitch Joel. Copyright © 2013 Mitch Joel. Excerpted by permission of Grand Central Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Firepelt

    Sorry atl res3

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  • Posted August 20, 2013

    Digital technology and the Internet have changed American busin


    Digital technology and the Internet have changed American business from top to bottom (what else is new?). What can you, or your company, do to survive in this new landscape? This book gives some answers.

    If your company doesn't already have a social media presence, forget about hiring some college kids to create one, while the rest of the company continues with its 20th century mentality. The entire company has to embrace social media, starting with the CEO. Most companies assume that they know who their customers are. Do some research, and find out for sure.

    There are ways to measure, for instance, who visits your website, what pages they click on, and how long they stay. If your company is not already up to its eyeballs in analyzing such data, you are missing out on a lot of potentially useful information.

    When you are talking to your customers, ask them how they stay connected. It's not a case of web or mobile or tablets being most important, but whatever screen the customer is using now. How can you make your customer's lives easier?

    This book also looks at how individuals can thrive in this new landscape. It is very rare for a person to, for instance, grow up wanting to get into marketing, and then spend their entire career in marketing. It's even more unlikely for it to happen at one company. You career path is going to resemble a squiggly line. Embrace the squiggle.

    As much as possible, get rid of cubicles and internal walls at your company. Encourage collaboration between different parts of your company. Such collaboration may create the new must have "killer app." The office itself is becoming less of a requirement, as it is now possible for a person's "office" to be anywhere they can use their laptop, tablet or smart phone.

    Many books have been written about the new digital world. This one belongs high on the list. It is easy to read, and is full of information for employers and employees.

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