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Cuban Miami
     

Cuban Miami

by Robert M Levine, Moises Asis (Joint Author)
 

For two centuries, Cuban exiles have found their way to the United States, especially to Florida. But since Castro's victory in 1959, Miami has seen almost one million Cubans arrive by sea and air. The impact on this area has been enormous. Miami---known as the "Exile Capital"---has a greater cultural affinity to Havana and the rest of Latin America than

Overview

For two centuries, Cuban exiles have found their way to the United States, especially to Florida. But since Castro's victory in 1959, Miami has seen almost one million Cubans arrive by sea and air. The impact on this area has been enormous. Miami---known as the "Exile Capital"---has a greater cultural affinity to Havana and the rest of Latin America than to Tallahassee, Florida's capital.

Cuban Miami is the first analytical, photographic record of Cuban migration to south Florida. Robert M. Levine and Moises Asis have interviewed members of every sector of the Cuban exile community, from the first pioneers to the mass waves in the early 1960s to those who arrived by raft during the late 1990s. In their wide-ranging investigation of Cuban-U.S. history, they touch upon all aspects of Cuban influence: politics, cuisine, music, assimilation, discrimination, and institution buildings. Miami has more Cuban food establishments than the nearby island does. The city has been fertile ground for germinating a unique synthesis of Cuban and Americans are the most prosperous immigrant group in the United States today, this success has come at a price---living in exile can exact a personal toll.

Cuban Miami is a feast for the eyes, including 180 photographs and original cartoons drawn for the book by Jose M. Varela, a well-known member of the Cuban-American community.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
While Cuban culture is an everyday feature of life in Miami, the economic influence of Cubans in Florida's largest city is truly a phenomenon. Cubans flocked to the United States in the years after Fidel Castro's revolution, with nearly 300,000 arriving between 1965 and 1973. From May to September 1980, another quarter of a million people fled Cuba, most to south Florida's "exile capital," Miami. Such is the strength of their cultural heritage that most Cubans living in Miami hold tightly to their Cuban identity, even though generations of them have never set foot in Cuba. Levine (history, Univ. of Miami), who has written numerous books on Cuba, and As s, a social services administrator in Florida, document the rich Cuban American cultural experience as well as the political and economic clout of Miami's Cuban population. Although there is little mention of poverty among the city's Cubans, the book is an intriguing mix of over 180 annotated photographs with a lively text. Recommended for all public and academic libraries.--Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., AL Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Booknews
Praising Cuban-Americans' cultural distinctness, hard work, and entrepreneurship, the authors present a photographic account of the influence of Cuban migration on the city. The text also discusses the cuisine, music, religion, everyday life, and politics. Photographs, cartoons in b&w. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813527802
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2000
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.60(d)

What People are Saying About This

Ileana Lehtinen
Cuban Miami gives a face to the thousand of Cuban exiles who call Miami home.
—Ileana Ros Lehtinen, U.S. House of Representatives (Fl)

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