Cuckoo

Cuckoo

3.6 5
by Richard Wright (2)
     
 

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The fight to survive is all in the mind.

There is nothing exceptional about Greg Summers, until the day he returns home to discover that his wife no longer recognises him and is married to a stranger using his name.

Perhaps it is an elaborate hoax, yet that wouldn't explain his vivid flashbacks to childhood, or the violent eruptions of blood

Overview


The fight to survive is all in the mind.

There is nothing exceptional about Greg Summers, until the day he returns home to discover that his wife no longer recognises him and is married to a stranger using his name.

Perhaps it is an elaborate hoax, yet that wouldn't explain his vivid flashbacks to childhood, or the violent eruptions of blood that accompany them. Nor does it explain the stray memories that seem to belong to an entirely separate man called Richard Jameson.

One of these men is a lie, and neither wishes it to be he. On the run from a creature that cannot exist, his comfortable truths shattered, Greg finds his whole knowledge of the world questionable. If he does not know himself, what can he trust himself to know?

"A plot as wild as this could have easily spun out of control, but Wright holds the reins tight. His dexterity is dazzling." - Hellnotes

Editorial Reviews

Lisa DuMond
Possibilities and questions. That's what Cuckoo boils down to. It is impossible to get through a white-knuckle reading of this chilling blend of science fiction and horror without building up a headful of questions. The irresistible urge to 'figure things out' is going to meet up with the immovable wall of a complex, constantly surprising plot.

Wright's vision would seem too abstract to control, but he is the master of this nightmare from start to finish.
SF Site, MEviews

Scribes World Reviews
Gripping to the end, this tale takes hold of the readers mind with piercing talons and doesn't let go until the final word. Don't miss it! 4 stars!
Jewel Dartt
Cuckoo is an incredible blend of suspense and sheer horror that builds into a terrifying climax. After reading Cuckoo I was afraid to turn off the lights and go to bed. Warning: Don't read Cuckoo at night. Richard Wright's first novel is a winner in the horror genre. Horror Fans buy this book. you will not regret it! 5 Stars!
Midnight Scribe Reviews
S. Joan Papek
Haunting and frightening, Cuckoo is a clever blend of mystery and horror with just a taste of science fiction for spice.

Wright, a Scottish author with genuine talent, uses the concept of writing "cross genre" (merging two or more genres into one tale) in an interesting way. Using flashbacks for at least one-half of the story, he hands the reader pieces of the puzzle one at a time, keeping them in suspense until the last piece is in place at the very end. The twist ending comes as a real surprise. Those that like mysteries with the flavor of horror will enjoy this book.
ForeWord Magazine Jan/00; Millennium Science Fiction & Fantasy, Jan/00

Joan S.

Popek

Haunting and frightening, Cuckoo is a clever blend of mystery and horror with just a taste of science fiction for spice. Wright, a Scottish author with genuine talent, uses the concept of writing "cross genre" (merging two or more genres into one tale) in an interesting way. Using flashbacks for at least one-half of the story, he hands the reader pieces of the puzzle one at a time, keeping them in suspense until the last piece is in place at the very end.
The beginning is a bit slow with a nameless person in a surreal situation that involves pain, but the reader doesn't know who is inflicting the pain or why when the sufferer has a sudden flashback memory of scalded lobsters.
The next moment, the meaning of the flashback becomes clear as Gregory Summers escorts his mistress into a lobster restaurant for an illicit evening of extramarital fun and games. The pace picks up. Feeling guilty about the affair but justifying it in his own mind preoccupies him so much that he overlooks a strange series of events involving his identity. Gregory is catapulted into an unreal situation in which his identity is ripped from him, and he discovers that another man has stolen his life. No one recognizes him as Gregory Summers. He soon discovers that not only has his life been stolen, but everyone he meets and all the identification on him identify him as someone named Richard Jameson. He begins to question his own memories, his sanity.
In the effort to gain his life back, he breaks into his own home and confronts his wife who doesn't recognize him and thinks he is a madman. He is befriended by a young man who believes him and is willing to help him discover what's happening to him. The tension increases as he is thwarted in his efforts by painful accidents, fiery explosions, strange creatures and a surprising turn of events with his mistress. He is on the verge of discovering who is doing this to him and sets out to get revenge, but his burning thirst for "why?" leads him into the darkest den of an even darker creature with motives he wishes he hadn't learned. The twist ending comes as a real surprise. Those that like mysteries with the flavor of horror will enjoy this book.
Foreword

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781463762032
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
09/06/2011
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.63(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

RICHARD WRIGHT has been writing strange, dark fictions for over a decade. His short stories have been widely published in the United Kingdom and USA, and his novels include Cuckoo, Thy Fearful Symmetry, Craven Place, and The Flesh Market.

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Cuckoo 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
dustdoctor More than 1 year ago
This was very strange,...first I liked it...than felt it got stranger,....pulled me in and left me confused all at the same time. Did not enjoy the ending so much.
linhug More than 1 year ago
I'm cofused. If this is the Richard Wright that wrote Black Boy and Native Son who died in 1960, how can he possibly be living in India with his wife and daughter? He has a new novel comming out and had one released in 2010? Someone cut and pasted the famous Richard Wright's bio and mixed it up with this author. This man gave an interview in February of 2012. He is NOT the Richard Wright, Black man who wrote Native Son and Black Boy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a fan of Richard Wright. I downloaded the sample. It left me on the edge of my seat. I am intruiged to read more about the character who is rough around the edges.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A real page turner, although the ending was a little disappointing.