CUCKOO'S EGG [NOOK Book]

Overview

Before the Internet became widely known as a global tool for terrorists, one perceptive U.S. citizen recognized its ominous potential. Armed with clear evidence of computer espionage, he began a highly personal quest to expose a hidden network of spies that threatened national security. But would the authorities back him up? Cliff Stoll's dramatic firsthand account is "a computer-age detective story, instantly fascinating [and] astonishingly ...
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CUCKOO'S EGG

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Overview

Before the Internet became widely known as a global tool for terrorists, one perceptive U.S. citizen recognized its ominous potential. Armed with clear evidence of computer espionage, he began a highly personal quest to expose a hidden network of spies that threatened national security. But would the authorities back him up? Cliff Stoll's dramatic firsthand account is "a computer-age detective story, instantly fascinating [and] astonishingly gripping" (Smithsonian).

Cliff Stoll was an astronomer turned systems manager at Lawrence Berkeley Lab when a 75-cent accounting error alerted him to the presence of an unauthorized user on his system. The hacker's code name was "Hunter"—a mysterious invader who managed to break into U.S. computer systems and steal sensitive military and security information. Stoll began a one-man hunt of his own: spying on the spy. It was a dangerous game of deception, broken codes, satellites, and missile bases—a one-man sting operation that finally gained the attention of the CIA . . . and ultimately trapped an international spy ring fueled by cash, cocaine, and the KGB.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307819420
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/23/2012
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 326
  • Sales rank: 144,525
  • File size: 4 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 21, 2013

    Top-Notch True Crime Here

    Cliff Stoll's non-fiction account of the events that lead him to unwind the trail of European hackers in US research and defense computing resources during the late '80s. Cliff has a way with words that allows for those who may not be the most well-versed in 'Computerese' or IT-jargon to understand exactly what is going on throughout this suspenseful yarn, yet thorough enough to satisfy the curiosity of a systems administrator. An all-time favorite story, I've purchased this book several times over the years--now it's finally come to the Nook store so I can have it with me where ever I go. Ace!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2000

    A Great Book! Educational too. A Must read.

    Is the story repetitive? It's a journal of events, not a science fiction story! It is documented the way it happened & that's what it makes it real. I read it years before I got into the computer field (getting ready to read it again), & I must say that it was not only interesting, but educational too. Hard to put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Another Day at the Collider: The Cuckoos Egg written by Clifford

    Another Day at the Collider:
    The Cuckoos Egg written by Clifford Stoll has stolen my heart. I started and finished this book in 2 days, I couldn’t put it down! The book isn’t excessively short, isn’t an easy read per say, but it really is an attention grabber.
    Starting out in California with our main character Clifford becoming a recent hire at the astronomy lab at the hill you can tell from the beginning this book was written by a scientist. Every number is carefully remembered, every detail well documented and random tangents which aren’t always relevant ever present. But all of these little things contribute to tell a truly thrilling tail of pursuit through the maze of an infantile global network of computers. The voice and style of writing throughout the book are simple, and to the point. But I believe this added to the book, making the somewhat advanced computer programming jargon quite accessible to the tech-impaired. Since the book is based off a well documented court case there are many transcripts of exactly what the hacker is doing and how he’s doing it. Clifford uses these transcripts beautifully by combining them with footnotes and stroke by stroke explanation. The cat and mouse game played out through 323 pages will keep you reading, with new and different twists and turns constantly shifting the entire focus of one Berkley hippy. Some of the greatest twist of course coming from out Berkley hippy dressed in corduroys and a Hawaiian T-Shirt strolling into high level military and F.B.I. buildings to tell them that they had missed something. All of these meetings add an incredible edge of comedy and really show the Juxtaposition between 2 worlds which were about to collide big time.
    I would suggest this book to people who have any interest in the beginnings of cyber security, or where the internet and hacking became a serious problem for our government.  This book is one of the reasons we all have to have 14 character passwords with every letter of the alphabet, numbers, and social security number for our Starbucks account. This book is also really great if you just like to know a few basic computer language things to impress your friends with! You’ll be able to talk all about the Gnu-Emacs hole and how it affected modern cyber security (even if it’s not relevant at all, you’ll still sound way smarter than you actually are!) I advise you to purchase a copy right now, and in a day when you’re done reading come back and let everyone else know just how much you liked this excellent thrill of the chase novel. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Randy

    The egg book tallea me about a egg falling and bracking.@nd if a egg brockes go to www.@bad boy son ass-o.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    Fascinating Story of one of the first computer hackers

    The theme of book still lives today. The same mistakes are being made by network administrators, management, and law enforcement. Cyber crime victims rarely know they are victims. This book illustrates that 20+ years ago this was an issue and today is more of issue because of how much more we are connected.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2000

    A spy story set in the time of early Internet

    During his first week as a system administrator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, Cliff Stoll noticed a mismatch of $0.75 in the total sum produced by two different programs used for system accounting. Within a day or two, he discovered that the system he is in charge of has been broken into. Most people would at that point shut the security hole, thus perhaps throwing away excellent material for a book. Dr. Stoll instead decided to track down the intruder, a quest that occupied most of his time for several months. His chase brought him in contact with several three-letter agencies, as well as celebrities Luis Alvarez and Bob Morris Sr. <P>Dr. Stall put considerable efforts to make descriptions of technical details as non-technical as possible. Still, enough details are preserved to bring fond memories to all those still remembering the BSD and System V Unices, VMS and early Internet. More amazing for me, however, was his deep and profound trust in the government agencies. In short, all of them wanted him to continue the chase while refused to help him in any way; requested information from him and at the same time giving no valuable information in return. As a topping, after Markus Hess -- the cracker Stoll has been chasing for month -- was arrested, FBI refused to release any information to Dr. Stoll and requested him to keep quiet, while at the same time leaked the story to a German magazine. Still, the whole episode seem to strengthen his belief in the government agencies, even more so when he discovers that the intruder is from abroad. Now if this is not patriotism, I do not know what it is. <P>All in all, the book reads as a very readable spy chase -- and a true one. Dr. Stoll writes well enough to succesfully convince even a non-American reader that he was doing the right thing and Hess was not. Or almost so.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2000

    Great Book, Love it!

    This is a great book. Once you start reading it, it gets so interesting that you don't want to stop. I felt like I was part of the search.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 1999

    A good story, but repetitive

    There's no doubt about this - this is a fascinating story, and should easily appeal to both the veteran systems administrator and the neophyte computer user with an interest in security. However, the author writes this book essentially as a 'blow-by-blow' retelling of of his attempts to catch and identify this hacker. The problem arises when you realize that most of what the author does is repeat the same three or four steps, over, and over, and over again. This book would make an exciting short story. As it is, by the time you make it halfway through, you feel like you've been through everything a hundred times. Granted, each step takes the author a little closer, and there are new and interesting things to discover, but the book ultimately starts to feel more like a deadweight than an adventure

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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