Culinary Tourism

Overview

For many tourists, tasting the authentic cuisine of a particular destination can be the highlight of travel. Exotic foods entice the traveler to experience a variety of culinary traditions and cultural customs, shaping both individual and group perceptions of food. The tourism industry savors foreign fare as consumers do, providing familiar settings such as restaurants and festivals to lure the hungry traveler. Although anthropologists and folklorists have written much about the nature of tourism, none have ...
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Culinary Tourism

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Overview

For many tourists, tasting the authentic cuisine of a particular destination can be the highlight of travel. Exotic foods entice the traveler to experience a variety of culinary traditions and cultural customs, shaping both individual and group perceptions of food. The tourism industry savors foreign fare as consumers do, providing familiar settings such as restaurants and festivals to lure the hungry traveler. Although anthropologists and folklorists have written much about the nature of tourism, none have focused on food's role in tourism. In Culinary Tourism, the contributors argue that the sensory experience of eating provides people with a unique means of communication. Because cuisines are often associated with particular cultures, eating can easily transport the taste buds and the mind to a table overlooking the Mediterranean, the Pacific, or the Caribbean, all without leaving the comforts of home. Long contends that although the interest in experiencing "otherness" is strong within American society, total immersion into the unfamiliar is not always welcome. In the U.S., the spicy flavors of Latin America and the exotic ingredients of Asia have been mainstreamed for everyday consumption. Culinary Tourism explains how and why interest in foreign food is expanding tastes -- and leading to commercial profit -- in America, but the book also looks at how culinary tourism combines one's personal experiences with one's cultural and social attitudes toward food and one's circumstances for adventurous eating.

Sampling foreign food, mainstreamed or not, has also become entertainment. The adventuresome are often willing to expend time, energy, and money to experience new culinary fare, especially when thought to be authentic. At home, people modify exotic recipes and incorporate them into familiar family traditions. Whether we are on vacation, at restaurants, or around the kitchen table, Long maintains, culinary tourism transports us into another realm of experience. The book's contributors, widely recognized food experts, examine the interplay of tourism and food traditions across the globe in public and commercial contexts, private and domestic settings, and around the United States. As these writers explore culinary tourism -- ranging from Tex-Mex in Minnesota to Kosher food in Poland -- Long encourages readers to venture outside the comforts of home and embark on new eating adventures.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

""As the study of tourism proper attends more closely to lived experience, and as the study of food continues to explore its tranactional character, these fields will find in Culinary Tourism a powerful conceptual framework with rich case studies." --Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblatt" --

""Recommended." --Choice" --

""Nonanthropologist readers... will discover the unexpected and fascinating terrain of food as an index of human culture. -Virginia Quarterly ReviewThis volume is a welcome collection of essays." --Gastronomica" --

""Twelve different writers discuss how restaurants and festivals market food to tourists, politics of the food industry, authentic southwest cooking, and food choices of various groups such as baby boomers and Mormon missionaries." --Kentucky Living" --

""Contributors to the book are widely recognized food experts who encourage readers to venture outside the comforts of home and embark on new eating experiences." --Lexington Herald-Leader" --

""Folklorists and scholars should appreciate this collection of essays on the ways in which food and travel intersect." -Publishers Weekly" --

""Serves a real purpose and deserves a respected place in the historical record." --Register of the Kentucky Historical Society" --

""A collection of articles which, without being heavy (like chocolate cake gone bad) or not-quite-there (like a flattened soufflé), takes you places by giving you an idea of the way people differ in what they eat yet similar in how it tastes." --Rockland (ME) Courier-Gazette" --

""Culinary Tourism is based upon and extends well-established concepts of folk culture in its social and material aspects, and the book abounds in fresh examples of food-related expression." --Western Folklore" --

""…Long's Culinary Tourism demonstrate[s] how food becomes the central lure for tourists seeking exotic foods in restaurants, festivals, stores, and even participatory cooking experiences." --Choice" --

""Culinary Tourism is a welcome and provocative addition to the literature on foodways and tourism." --Journal of American Folklore" --

""One leaves Culinary Tourism with a deeper understanding of some of food's complex relationships to the politics of culture. Although this collection feels more like a necessary foundation than an exciting departure, the book will undoubtedly serve as an important springboard for future work that further develops the interpretive challenges it introduces." --Diane Tye, Ethnologies" --

""Culinary Tourism is a welcome and provocative addition to the literature on foodways and tourism." --Yvonne R. Lockwood, Journal of American Folklore" --

""One leaves Culinary Tourism with a deeper understanding of some of food's complex relationships to the politics of culture." --Ethnologies" --

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813122922
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • Publication date: 9/14/2010
  • Series: Material Worlds
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 0.88 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Lucy M. Long teaches folklore and food studies in the International Studies and American Culture Studies Programs at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. She is the editor of the American Folklore Society's foodways section journal, Digest.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction 1
Ch. 1 Culinary Tourism: A Folkloristic Perspective on Eating and Otherness 20
Pt. 1 Culinary Tourism in Public and Commercial Contexts 51
Ch. 2 Tasting an Imagined Thailand: Authenticity and Culinary Tourism in Thai Restaurants 53
Ch. 3 From "Montezuma's Revenge" to "Mexican Truffles": Culinary Tourism across the Rio Grande 76
Ch. 4 Flavors of Memory: Jewish Food as Culinary Tourism in Poland 97
Ch. 5 Incorporating the Local Tourist at the Big Island Poke Festival 114
Pt. 2 Culinary Tourism in Private and Domestic Contexts 129
Ch. 6 "Of Course, in Guatemala, Bananas are Better": Exotic and Familiar Eating Experiences of Mormon Missionaries 131
Ch. 7 Kashering the Melting Pot: Oreos, Sushi Restaurants, "Kosher Treif," and the Observant American Jew 157
Ch. 8 Culinary Tourism among Basques and Basque Americans: Maintenance and Inventions 186
Pt. 3 Culinary Tourism in Constructed and Emerging Contexts 207
Ch. 9 From Culinary Other to Mainstream America: Meanings and Uses of Southwestern Cuisine 209
Ch. 10 Rites of Intensification: Eating and Ethnicity in the Catskills 226
Ch. 11 Pass the Tofu, Please: Asian Food for Aging Baby Boomers 245
Ch. 12 Ethnic Heritage Food in Lindsborg, Kansas, and New Glarus, Wisconsin 268
Contributors 297
Index 301
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