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Culp's Hill
     

Culp's Hill

5.0 2
by John Cox
 

South of the town of Gettysburg, Union troops take possession of the wooded heights at the tip of their "fishhook" defensive line. Defending Culp's Hill meant protecting the flank; it was the key to victory. Using official reports, letters, diaries, and memoirs, this book describes the struggle for the high ground and tells how and why the generals made their

Overview


South of the town of Gettysburg, Union troops take possession of the wooded heights at the tip of their "fishhook" defensive line. Defending Culp's Hill meant protecting the flank; it was the key to victory. Using official reports, letters, diaries, and memoirs, this book describes the struggle for the high ground and tells how and why the generals made their crucial decisions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306812347
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
07/01/2003
Series:
Battleground America Series
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
0.42(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

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Culp's Hill 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is really an excellent book on the fight for the Union right flank, Culp's Hill, at Gettysburg. Too often this part of the battle is ignored. Mr. Cox writes a wonderful narrative, with useful information. It is a very absorbing read. Of course, General George Sears Greene is the focal point of the book, but Mr. Cox covers all areas of the fight on the hill on July 2, 1863. Excellent.
Guest More than 1 year ago
General George Sears Greene, Colonel David Ireland, the 137 New York, the 149 New York are officers and regiments rarely highlighted when mentioning the victorious Union forces at Gettysburg. John Cox's work acknowledges their desperate fight by the 12th Corps, 3rd Brigade against Confederate General Edward Johnson's Division in the evening of July 2, 1863. General Meade's shifting of 2/3's of the 12th Corps allows General Lee an advantage of 'outnumbering almost 4 to 1' at this critical moment. Defending this ground was as vital to the Union as the actions of Little Round Top. After discussing the preparations, artillery barrage, assault and results, the author provides a guided tour of the field of battle. A must read for Civil War Enthusists.