The Cult of Mac

The Cult of Mac

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by Leander Kahney
     
 

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There is no product on the planet that enjoys the devotion of a Macintosh computer. Apple's machines have legions of loyal, sometimes demented fans. The Cult of Mac surveys the devoted following that has grown up around Macintosh computers. Like fans of a football team or a rock group, Macintosh fanatics have their own subculture, with clearly defined

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Overview

There is no product on the planet that enjoys the devotion of a Macintosh computer. Apple's machines have legions of loyal, sometimes demented fans. The Cult of Mac surveys the devoted following that has grown up around Macintosh computers. Like fans of a football team or a rock group, Macintosh fanatics have their own subculture, with clearly defined obsessions, rites, and passages. Famously dedicated to their computers, many Mac fans eat, sleep, and breathe the Macintosh. Fans who get Mac tattoos and haircuts, people who attend Apple Store openings like they are Grateful Dead shows, counterculture icons who love the Mac, people who turn old Macs into aquariums (or bongs), Ellen Fein lookalike contests, erotic fiction featuring Steve Jobs; it's all here. Technology reporter Leander Kahney exposes all sides of Mac fanaticism, from the innocuous to the insane.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
For millions, the Mac is far more than a computer: It’s a passion, an obsession, a cult. Now that cult’s been documented brilliantly. If you’ve ever smiled back at a happy Mac startup icon (or mourned its absence), you will love The Cult of Mac.

Here are the Mac tattoos, the mods and macquariums, the collectors and fantasy Mac designers. Here are Macs in movies (notice how the good guys always get ’em?). Here’s the semiotic significance of the two Steves, and the free-love commune that became Northern California’s biggest Mac dealer.

From long-forgotten Macworlds to brand-new iPods, here’s the whole Mac cultural experience, bound between two hard covers: perfect for your coffee table, or for burying in a time capsule so your grandkids will see what it was really like. Otherwise, they’ll never believe you. Bill Camarda, from the December 2004 Read Only

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781886411838
Publisher:
No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
Publication date:
11/28/2004
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
8.46(w) x 10.42(h) x 0.86(d)

Meet the Author

Leander Kahney is an editor at Wired News, where his Cult of Mac blog is a reader favorite. Previously, Kahney covered Apple and the Mac community for Wired News. He treats his subjects with insight and humor and his experiences interacting with Mac fanatics and attending Mac events around the world are highly entertaining. Kahney's work introduces an element of warmth not usually associated with technology reporting.

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The Cult of Mac 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ever since its inception 20 years (!) ago, the Mac has attracted a devoted following. For its first 10 years or so, there really was nothing in its price range that seriously rivalled its GUI. Though that edge has eroded significantly by now, this book attests to the presence of a still admiring throng. Unlike many computer books, this is focused on its distinctive user base. Yes, sections of the book talk about various present and bygone Mac products. But the book is clearly most about Mac fans. It has biographies of well known users. At least, they are well known within this community. And it is a world wide web of its own. We meet users in Iceland, Japan and all over. In fact, a sizeable portion of the book covers the Mac scene in Japan. Very creative and colourful blokes. Years before Unicode rose to handle languages like Japanese, the Mac had an approach to internationlisation that readily catered to Japanese. When Microsoft and others were still mostly ascii. So no surprise that the Japanese Mac community has a rich history. You don't have to use a Mac to appreciate this book. A fascinating peek at a thriving bunch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book would have been better if it offered a balanced view. I see the 'cult of Mac' as a dangerous affiliation, no better than the followers of the deadly Jim Jones, or the comet/spaceship suicide cult. The Mac userbase consists of folks who, for some reason, want to be a part of a self-selected persecuted 'minority' group. When I looked at this book, I was hoping to see some explanation about this, but all I found was a fluff piece.