Cultural Dimensions Of Expatriate Life In Thailand

Cultural Dimensions Of Expatriate Life In Thailand

by Bill Drake
     
 
If you are an American who is looking for a place to live away from "the homeland", you will find nowhere on earth where there is more appreciation for the idiosyncrasies of a foreigner who wants to adapt and fit into their host culture. This isn't to say that the Thai people are without faults - there are those who can be critical, rude, deceitful, even hostile to

Overview

If you are an American who is looking for a place to live away from "the homeland", you will find nowhere on earth where there is more appreciation for the idiosyncrasies of a foreigner who wants to adapt and fit into their host culture. This isn't to say that the Thai people are without faults - there are those who can be critical, rude, deceitful, even hostile to those who they call 'Farang", but they can also be that way with their fellow Thais who come from another part of the country, or who are without money or social position, or who just rub them the wrong way. Thailand is not paradise - just the closest to it that anyone not from Thailand is likely to find when searching for near-perfection.
Farang have been coming to Thailand for centuries, and have provided an endless source of amusement and refreshment for the Thai people. In return, the Farang have been offered greater access to the homes and hearts of the Thai people than in any other country in Asia. Perhaps it is the self-confidence that comes of having been an independent people throughout their history - occasionally invaded, never conquered - that gives the Thais this extraordinary poise and self-assurance. For whatever reason the Thais are the open, friendly, warm-hearted people that they are, it is a privilege to live among them and share their sensual, mystical, emotional world, as I along with so many others from the West have done over the years. If you are planning to visit or live in Thailand for the first time all I can ultimately say to you is that you are a most fortunate person. Relax, take your time, learn to speak Thai, and you will find that their world is as open to you as if you had been born among them.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453852309
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/23/2010
Pages:
172
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.37(d)

Meet the Author

Author Bill Drake lives with his artist wife Lisle on a biodynamic farm in the Texas Hill Country. Bill's first book was "The Cultivators Handbook of Marijuana", which began life as a little yellow self-published book written and printed in Oregon where Bill had been living for several years experimenting with growing various interesting plants. Some say that 'Cultivators" changed the home-growing scene forever because up until that time nobody had a good reference book to follow, and Bill's stated purpose in writing it was to free people from the oppression of the drug syndicates and the American police state which mysteriously seemed to be emerging together. After more than 40 years "Cultivators" is still in print, although it has been superseded by many, many excellent 'grow your own' books by other talented writers, especially Robert C. Clarke. "Cultivators" was followed by a series of books exploring the recreational and medicinal use of Marijuana and the other great natural drugs of mankind - Coca and Opium, and Tobacco. In 1981 along with his friend and partner Bill founded the Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, developing the company's flagship brand 'American Spirit".

After selling SFNT to investors Bill embarked on a second career that incorporated his love for learning about how people from different world cultures view life, communicate, make decisions, solve problems, raise children, and try to become fully developed persons in the course of their lifetime. Based on his extensive travels and international work earlier in life, Bill founded CultureBank Associates, a cross-cultural training firm, and worked with some of the major US, European and Asian companies helping their employees become more familiar with each other's sometimes wildly different ways of accomplishing the same tasks. Bill's current series of books entitled "Cultural Dimensions of Expatriate Life", now numbering over 20 full-length country culture studies, is the result of those years of working with, and learning about the key cultural differences that can make teamwork, communication, collaboration, and adjustment to living in another culture, so challenging.

For more information about Bill Drake go to www.cultivatorshandbook.com and to view an extensive collection of Lisle Drake's digital printmaking go to www.mermaidsprings.com

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