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Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services
     

Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services

1.8 5
by Jerry V. Diller, Diller
 

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ISBN-10: 0534355846

ISBN-13: 9780534355845

Pub. Date: 01/28/1999

Publisher: Cengage Learning

Offering a balance of clinical and theoretical information, Jerry Diller provides a practical book focused on how to provide cross-cultural services effectively. You'll find coverage of general principles of cultural diversity and multiculturalism, the process of cross-cultural service delivery, and cultural information on specific client populations. The author

Overview

Offering a balance of clinical and theoretical information, Jerry Diller provides a practical book focused on how to provide cross-cultural services effectively. You'll find coverage of general principles of cultural diversity and multiculturalism, the process of cross-cultural service delivery, and cultural information on specific client populations. The author builds a general understanding of what cultural diversity is and why it is important. He considers the related dynamics of prejudice and racism, as well as the meaning of culture and cultural differences. He also helps students better understand their own prejudices so they can be more effective counselors when working with culturally-different clients.
The author includes captivating interview with four professionals, each from a different ethnic background: Latino/Latina, Native American, African American, and Asian American. Their interviews, presented verbatim to retain their personal and cultural flavor, are filled with rich cultural material and hands-on clinical suggestions and cautions.
This topic, seldom covered in multicultural texts, is explored thoroughly. Students will consider such questions as What is racism? How does it operate in individuals and institutions to oppress people of color? Why is it hard for mainstream whites to acknowledge it and their own privilege? How do prejudices of human service providers compromise the helping process? How can one become aware of and alter negative racial attitudes. To assist students in personalizing these questions, the author provides a series of self-awareness exercises.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780534355845
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Series:
Counseling Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
242
Product dimensions:
6.43(w) x 9.27(h) x 0.44(d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction. 2. What It Means To Be Culturally Competent. 3. Understanding Racism and Prejudice. 4. Understanding Culture and Cultural Differences. 5. Ethnic Children, Parenting and Families. 6. Mental Health Issues. 7. Bias In Service Delivery. 8. Critical Issues In Working with Culturally Different Clients. 9. Working with Latino/A Clients-An Interview with Inez Souza. 10. Working with Native American Clients-An Interview with Jack Lawson. 11. Working with African American Clients-An Interview with Jimmy Turner. 12. Working with Asian American Clients-An Interview with Dan Hocov. 13. Working With White And White Ethnic Clients. REFERENCES. INDEX.

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Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services 1.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Depending on your political views and views on current times, you may or may not like this book. It leans far left. Also, it teaches you how to talk to people who are 1st generation in America. If you are dealing with anyone who is 2nd or 3rd, it is insulting. I did not get anything out of this book and my professor even warned us that it was a bit offensive. I'm not sure why it is still part of the curriculum.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I disliked the book from the beginning and wished I didn't have to finish it as one of my required readings. Its use of the term "people of color" implies that white is not a color and the writer makes no effort to understand how that term is offensive to whites. It is an exclusionary term used to ponder to the feelings of one group at the expense of the other group. This creates an "us and not you" attitude. We teach our children that white is a color and when they grow up learn that white is only a color if it’s on a wall, a car, or a dress. "People of color" in its use is nice and respectful toward its recipients and yet the term "whites' or "white people" is almost always used with a negative connotation in books, in the media, and on the streets. "White people are racist". "White people don't understand our plight." And so on. There is extreme stereotyping that whites do not or cannot understand other cultures and that whites have not suffered racial discrimination. To the contrary, I grew up very poor and have been racially discriminated against many times. How about the knockout game? I saw a t-shirt that said, "God created perfection when He created the black woman." Imagine if the word black was replaced with white the uproar we'd hear. The writer states that non-white cultures are "...socially stigmatized..." and yet this very statement stigmatizes whites as the source of the non-white stigmatizing. The writer implies that the whites are not an ethnic group nor do whites have culture. The writer himself stigmatizes, "culturally diverse clients..." by stating that they are, "...especially susceptible, given their more limited knowledge of mainstream culture." Every minority on the planet should be offended by that. The writer states that building trust between one culture and another is, "...not easy." This is not true. All you have to be is sincere. Be yourself. Be respectful. Be fair. That's it. Do those things for each person regardless of race, culture, or ethnic group and you will have good rapport. All ethnic groups deserve to be treated with respect and with fairness, all of them. As I said, I wish I did not have to finish this book.
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