The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: A Reader / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$19.27
(Save 64%)
Est. Return Date: 09/24/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$31.74
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $10.79
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 80%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $10.79   
  • New (9) from $36.67   
  • Used (10) from $10.79   

Overview

The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating offers an ethnographically informed perspective on the ways in which people use food to make sense of life in an increasingly interconnected world.

  • Uses food as a central idiom for teaching about culture and addresses broad themes such as globalization, capitalism, market economies, and consumption practices
  • Spanning 5 continents, features studies from 11 countries—Japan, China, Russia, Ukraine, Germany, France, Burkina Faso, Chile, Trinidad, Mexico, and the United States
  • Offers discussion of such hot topics as sushi, fast food, gourmet foods, and food scares and contamination
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Here at last is a comprehensive, thoroughly absorbing reader on contemporary culinary tastes and techniques. No student of food, globalization, or political economy can afford to overlook this valuable collection.” Stanley Brandes, University of California, Berkeley

“A fascinating collection of essays that ranges from everyday food consumption to the global politics of food. The analyses yield surprising insights into familiar products and the social world of which they are such an important part. While the book, unlike its subjects, is inedible, it is highly readable and intellectually nutritious.” George Ritzer, University of Maryland

"...provides fascinating glimpses of the behind-the-scene world of global food distribution and economics and their societal impacts on people living very different lives on opposite ends of the world" Journal of Sensory Studies

"The book provides a fascinating journey through the politics, economics and culture of food in a globalized society...this book is a gold mine of thought-provoking facts, ideas and concepts...a literary delight." Journal of Sociolinguistics

"A good tool for an introductory course on culture and society or perhaps a more advanced course on food, politics and global movements." Social Anthropology

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

James L. Watson is Fairbank Professor of Chinese Society and Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. His books include Golden Arches East: McDonald’s in East Asia(edited 1998), Village Life in Hong Kong (with Rubie Watson, 2004), and Between Two Cultures (edited, Blackwell, 1977).

Melissa L. Caldwell is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Not by Bread Alone: Social Support in the New Russia (2004).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction: James L. Watson and Melissa L. Caldwell.

Part I: Food and Globalization:.

1. How Sushi Went Global: Theodore C. Bestor.

2. French Beans for the Masses: A Modern Historical Geography of Food in Burkina Faso: Susanne Freidberg.

3. Fresh Demand: The Consumption of Chilean Produce in the United States: Walter L. Goldfrank.

4. Coca-Cola: A Black Sweet Drink from Trinidad: Daniel Miller.

5. China’s Big Mac Attack: James L. Watson.

6. Of Hamburger and Social Space: Consuming McDonald’s in Beijing: Yunxiang Yan.

.

Part II: Yuppification, Gentrification, and Domesticating Tastes:.

7. Children’s Food and Islamic Dietary Restrictions in Xi’an: Maris Boyd Gillette.

8. The Rise of Yuppie Coffees and the Reimagination of Class in the United States: William Roseberry.

9. Crafting Grand Cru Chocolates in Contemporary France: Susan J. Terrio.

10. Globalized Childhood? Kentucky Fried Chicken in Beijing: Eriberto P. Lozada Jr..

11. Domesticating the French Fry: McDonald’s and Consumerism in Moscow: Melissa L. Caldwell.

12. “India Shopping”: Indian Grocery Stores and Transnational Configurations of Belonging: Purnima Mankekar.

.

Part III: The Political Economy of Food:.

13. Food and the Counterculture: A Story of Bread and Politics: Warren Belasco.

14. Industrial Tortillas and Folkloric Pepsi: The Nutritional Consequences of Hybrid Cuisines in Mexico: Jeffrey M. Pilcher.

15. Food, Hunger, and the State: Susan Brownell.

16. The Bakers of Bernberg and the Logics of Communism and Capitalism: Hans Buechler and Judith-Maria Buechler.

17. The Global Food Fight: Robert Paarlberg.

18. Half-Lives and Healthy Bodies: Discourses on “Contaminated” Food and Healing in Post-Chernobyl Ukraine: Sarah Drue Phillips.

19. Mad Cow Mysteries: Harriet Ritvo

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)