Culture and Society 1780-1950 / Edition 2

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Overview

Acknowledged as perhaps the masterpiece of materialist criticism in the English language, this omnibus ranges over British literary history from George Eliot to George Orwell to inquire about the complex ways economic reality shapes the imagination.

Columbia University Press

"An account and an interpretation of our responses in though and feeling to the changes in English society since the late eighteenth century.

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Editorial Reviews

Political Science Quarterly - M.S. Wilkins
The earliest ideas on culture, Mr. Williams claims, developed in opposition to the laissez-faire society of the political economists. As the ideas on culture took shape, on the one hand, they became identified with a 'whole way of life.' On the other hand... culture became a court of appeals where real values could be determined. Culture, thus separated from the whole society, was associated with the idea of perfection through the study of the arts... Mr. Williams contrasts the ideas of ' culture as art' and 'culture as a whole way of life,' and commends the latter... the book should definitely be read by all those interested in English intellectual history.
Political Science Quarterly - M. S. Wilkins

The earliest ideas on culture, Mr. Williams claims, developed in opposition to the laissez-faire society of the political economists. As the ideas on culture took shape, on the one hand, they became identified with a 'whole way of life.' On the other hand... culture became a court of appeals where real values could be determined. Culture, thus separated from the whole society, was associated with the idea of perfection through the study of the arts... Mr. Williams contrasts the ideas of ' culture as art' and 'culture as a whole way of life,' and commends the latter... the book should definitely be read by all those interested in English intellectual history.

Political Science Quarterly
The earliest ideas on culture, Mr. Williams claims, developed in opposition to the laissez-faire society of the political economists. As the ideas on culture took shape, on the one hand, they became identified with a 'whole way of life.' On the other hand... culture became a court of appeals where real values could be determined. Culture, thus separated from the whole society, was associated with the idea of perfection through the study of the arts... Mr. Williams contrasts the ideas of ' culture as art' and 'culture as a whole way of life,' and commends the latter... the book should definitely be read by all those interested in English intellectual history.

— M. S. Wilkins

Harold Rosenberg

CULTURE AND SOCIETY is worth a library of literary and political tracts in that it digs into the ideological layers that envelop modern politics. Written from an independent Left standpoint, this critical history of the concept of culture in England from 1780 to 1950 is exactly to the point of contemporary discussions of value.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231057011
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 7/25/1983
  • Series: Morningside Book Series
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 363
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 8.22 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Meet the Author

One of the century's most distinguished public intellectuals, Raymond Williams (1921-1988) helped to create and form the conceptual space of contemporary literary & cultural studies.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

IntroductionPart 1: A Nineteenth-Century Tradition I. Contrastsi. Edmund Burke and William Cobbettii. Robert Southey and Robert Owen2. The Romantic Artist3. Mill on Bentham and Coleridge4. Thomas Carlyle5. The Industrial Novels: Mary Barton and North and South, Mrs Gaskell; Hard Times, Dickens; Sybil, Disraeli; Alton Locke, Kingsley; Felix Holt, George Eliot6. J. H. Newman and Matthew Arnold7. Art and SocietyPart II: Interregnum i. W. H. Mallockii. The ' New Aesthetics'iii. George Gissingiv. Shaw and Fabianismv. Critics of the Statevi. T. E. HulmePart III: Twentieth-Century Opinions 1. D. H. Lawrence2. R. H. Tawney3. T. S. Eliot4. Two Literary Criticsi. I. A. Richardsii. F. R. Leavis5. Marxism and Culture6. George Orwell

Columbia University Press

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