Culture Of Empire / Edition 1

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Overview

A history of the Chicano community cannot be complete without taking into account the United States' domination of the Mexican economy beginning in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, writes Gilbert G. González. For that economic conquest inspired U.S. writers to create a "culture of empire" that legitimated American dominance by portraying Mexicans and Mexican immigrants as childlike "peons" in need of foreign tutelage, incapable of modernizing without Americanizing, that is, submitting to the control of U.S. capital. So powerful was and is the culture of empire that its messages about Mexicans shaped U.S. public policy, particularly in education, throughout the twentieth century and even into the twenty-first.

In this stimulating history, Gilbert G. González traces the development of the culture of empire and its effects on U.S. attitudes and policies toward Mexican immigrants. Following a discussion of the United States' economic conquest of the Mexican economy, González examines several hundred pieces of writing by American missionaries, diplomats, business people, journalists, academics, travelers, and others who together created the stereotype of the Mexican peon and the perception of a "Mexican problem." He then fully and insightfully discusses how this misinformation has shaped decades of U.S. public policy toward Mexican immigrants and the Chicano (now Latino) community, especially in terms of the way university training of school superintendents, teachers, and counselors drew on this literature in forming the educational practices that have long been applied to the Mexican immigrant community.

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Editorial Reviews

Southwestern Historical Quarterly - Paul Hart
Providing a fresh interpretive analysis...Gilbert Gonzalez argues convincingly that the study of Mexican immigration to the United States, and the delveopment of the Chicano community, demands an understanding of the consequences of America's economic domination of Mexico, which followed the U.S. Civil War.
The Journal of Latin American Anthropology - Nicholas De Genova
Amidst ongoing efforts to conceptualize the inevitable but often agonistic intersections of Latin American and Latino studies, Gilbert Gonzalez's Culture of Empire comes as a refreshing and valuable intervention.
Southwestern Historical Quarterly
Providing a fresh interpretive analysis...Gilbert Gonzalez argues convincingly that the study of Mexican immigration to the United States, and the delveopment of the Chicano community, demands an understanding of the consequences of America's economic domination of Mexico, which followed the U.S. Civil War.
— Paul Hart
The Journal of Latin American Anthropology
Amidst ongoing efforts to conceptualize the inevitable but often agonistic intersections of Latin American and Latino studies, Gilbert Gonzalez's Culture of Empire comes as a refreshing and valuable intervention.
— Nicholas De Genova
Southwestern Historical Quarterly
Providing a fresh interpretive analysis...Gilbert Gonzalez argues convincingly that the study of Mexican immigration to the United States, and the delveopment of the Chicano community, demands an understanding of the consequences of America's economic domination of Mexico, which followed the U.S. Civil War.
-- Paul Hart
The Journal of Latin American Anthropology
Amidst ongoing efforts to conceptualize the inevitable but often agonistic intersections of Latin American and Latino studies, Gilbert Gonzalez's Culture of Empire comes as a refreshing and valuable intervention.
-- Nicholas De Genova
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780292702073
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 266
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Gilbert G. González is Professor of Social Sciences and Director of the Labor Studies Program at the University of California, Irvine.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. The Economic Conquest and Its Social Relations
2. American Writers Invade Mexico
3. The Imperial Burden: The Mexican Problem and Americanization
4. The Peaceful Conquest and Mexican Migration within Mexico and to the United States
5. The Transnational Mexican Problem
6. Empire, Domestic Policy, and the Education of Mexican Immigrants
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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