The Culture of the Meiji Period / Edition 1

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Overview

"This book, a translation of Irokawa's 1969 classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System. . . . the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it."--L. L. Cornell, Pacific Affairs"A fascinating account of aspects of Japanese culture between 1868 and the early twentieth century. . . . Irokawa Daikichi is an indefatigable researcher, and the fruits of his own and others' labors on back roads and in old storehouses are amply represented here. Moreover, he has discovered materials untouched since the Meiji period, and he is able to interpret them in fresh, provocative ways. He makes excellent use of poetry, letters, diaries, and songs to probe the mentality of peasants and rustic intellectuals, and he interprets his findings in a way that challenges major post-World War II trends in historiography."--J. Victor Koschmann, Journal of Asian Studies
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Editorial Reviews

Pacific Affairs
This book, a translation of Irokawa's 1969 classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System. . . . the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it.
— L. L. Cornell
Journal of Asian Studies
A fascinating account of aspects of Japanese culture between 1868 and the early twentieth century. . . . Irokawa Daikichi is an indefatigable researcher, and the fruits of his own and others' labors on back roads and in old storehouses are amply represented here. Moreover, he has discovered materials untouched since the Meiji period, and he is able to interpret them in fresh, provocative ways. He makes excellent use of poetry, letters, diaries, and songs to probe the mentality of peasants and rustic intellectuals, and he interprets his findings in a way that challenges major post-World War II trends in historiography.
— J. Victor Koschmann
Pacific Affairs - L.L. Cornell
This book, a translation of Irokawa's 1969 classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System. . . . the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it.
Journal of Asian Studies - J. Victor Koschmann
A fascinating account of aspects of Japanese culture between 1868 and the early twentieth century. . . . Irokawa Daikichi is an indefatigable researcher, and the fruits of his own and others' labors on back roads and in old storehouses are amply represented here. Moreover, he has discovered materials untouched since the Meiji period, and he is able to interpret them in fresh, provocative ways. He makes excellent use of poetry, letters, diaries, and songs to probe the mentality of peasants and rustic intellectuals, and he interprets his findings in a way that challenges major post-World War II trends in historiography.
Pacific Affairs - L. L. Cornell
This book, a translation of Irokawa's 1969 classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System. . . . the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it.
From the Publisher
"This book, a translation of Irokawa's 1969 classic Meiji no Bunka, is best described as an analysis of popular political consciousness in the Meiji period and its corruption by the Emperor System. . . . the translation is lucid and seamless, a remarkable achievement given the number of contributors who worked on it."—L. L. Cornell, Pacific Affairs

"A fascinating account of aspects of Japanese culture between 1868 and the early twentieth century. . . . Irokawa Daikichi is an indefatigable researcher, and the fruits of his own and others' labors on back roads and in old storehouses are amply represented here. Moreover, he has discovered materials untouched since the Meiji period, and he is able to interpret them in fresh, provocative ways. He makes excellent use of poetry, letters, diaries, and songs to probe the mentality of peasants and rustic intellectuals, and he interprets his findings in a way that challenges major post-World War II trends in historiography."—J. Victor Koschmann, Journal of Asian Studies

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691000305
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/1988
  • Series: Princeton Library of Asian Translations Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 344
  • Product dimensions: 5.04 (w) x 7.94 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface to the English Translation vii
Editor's Introduction ix
Introduction 3
Japan: A Very Strange Country 3
The Emperor System as a "Weight Upon the Eyes," 9
The Limits and Scope of the Problem 15
I The Creation of A Grass-Roots Culture 19
The Silent Folk World 19
First Stirring 25
Subtle Transformations Toward Modernity 29
A Sickness of Soul 40
The Impact of the Restoration on Mountain Villages 44
II The Impact Of Western Culture 51
The Approach of Reform Bureaucrats 51
Advocates of Enlightenment and the People 59
The Cultural Gulf Between Japan and the West 68
III Wandering Pilgrims 76
Restoration Youth 76
A Spiritual Journey 84
Grass-Roots Self-Government 92
Substitution and Restatement 102
Creating a People's Constitution 108
Swan Song 113
IV Poetry in Chinese and Revolutionary Thought 123
Onuma Chinzan and Mori Shunto
Two Contrasting Undercurrents 123
Historical Consciousness and Poetic Spirit 131
The Life of Local Men of Letters 139
Politics and Literature 143
V The Heights and Depths of Popular Consciousness 151
The Voices of the Inarticulate 151
The Thoughts of Unknown Soldiers 159
Mountain Village Communes 164
Abandoning Conventional Morality 171
The Clash of Ideas at the Lower Social Level 181
From Peak to Valley 191
VI Carriers of Meiji Culture 196
The Establishment of the Japanese Intellectual Class 196
Opening the Eye to the Inner Life 207
Views of Civilization 212
VII Meiji Conditions of Nonculture 219
Desperate Farming Villages in the Meiji Era 219
Consciousness in the Lower Depths 224
The Age of the Lost Ideal 234
VIII The Emperor System as a Spiritual Structure 245
Introduction 245
The Legacy of Kokutai 247
The Emperor and the People 251
A Tradition Without Structure 260
Maruyama's Interpretation of Kokutai 267
The Kyodotai 273
The "Family-State" (Kazoku Kokka) 280
"Domicide" (Iegoroshi) 287
A Soldier's Feelings 293
The Power of National Education 299
Conclusion 309
Index of Names Cited 313
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