Cumbayah

Cumbayah

by Floyd Cooper, Floyd Cooper
     
 
"Cumbayah" is an enduring campfire song for children and a source of inspiration for adults. Though its roots are in the African-American tradition, it speaks to people of many different cultures, ages, and religious. With power and grace, Floyd Cooper depicts scenes from everyday life that emphasize how people all over the world are united in spirit. Here is an

Overview

"Cumbayah" is an enduring campfire song for children and a source of inspiration for adults. Though its roots are in the African-American tradition, it speaks to people of many different cultures, ages, and religious. With power and grace, Floyd Cooper depicts scenes from everyday life that emphasize how people all over the world are united in spirit. Here is an uplifting book that, with its simple lyrics, can also help teach children to read and sing. A historical note and a musical arrangement are included.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sheree van Vreede
Floyd Cooper revives a classic folk song, Cumbayah, which means, "Come by Here" in the Gullah dialect. The book opens with background information about the Gullah people, paying homage to the song's rich history. The soft hues of the illustrations are inviting and present many cultures, which creates a bridge between the diversity of the past, present, and future. His book contains a simple musical arrangement, and singers can easily adapt the song and create new verses to suit their feelings and situations.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Two African children laugh as they play in a rambling tree. A Middle Eastern boy covers his head for "someone's hurting," and busy people rush by a woman and her son crouched in a doorway in "someone needs you." Cooper has taken the original Gullah classic, added some new verses, and then invites readers/singers to do the same. The soft paintings take us on a world tour of communities through a series of portraits of people who fulfill the song's lyrics with marvelous expression. Cooper's monochromes preserve the classicism of the song and use present situations to show how the song lives today. He has given new expression to an old favorite.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3This book combines the simple verses of this well-known spiritual with Cooper's glowing illustrations to tell a global tale far beyond the words. The pictures, oil wash on illustration board, begin with a circle of children sitting cross legged, joining hands, and singing the first verse. Each subsequent stanza is illustrated with page-encompassing paintings that show children and adults from around the world. (However, none of these places are identified in the book.) Youngsters are shown sleeping under trees; fishermen work throwing their nets; for the verse, "Someone's hurting, Lord" a child is shown covering his face as he crouches in hiding while bombs fly in the background; and a seemingly homeless pair sit in a doorway, illustrating the words, "Someone needs you, Lord." Many of the pictures have a circular flow to them as objects curve around the characters: a fishing net hovers in a semicircle over the fishermen. Children sleep beside trees whose trunks curve around them. The final line, "Oh Lord, Cumbayah" shows another group of children raising colorful banners above their heads. The book concludes with the words and music for the song. Although beautifully done, this is a message-laden book that will be useful, to be sure, for adults to teach children about tolerance and differences among peoples as well as similarities.Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688135447
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1998
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.31(w) x 10.31(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

public domain in law, legal availability for public use, free of charge, of materials, processes, devices, skills, and plans that are not protected by copyright or patent, including those on which copyright or patent has lapsed.
source: The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Copyright © 2001-05 Columbia University Press.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >