Curators and Collections: Management of the Arts

Curators and Collections: Management of the Arts

by Sarah James, Nicholas James
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The first edition of Curators and Collections, published in 1997 was based on interviews and features published in the quarterly review: Cv Journal of Art and Crafts (1988-91). These recorded the launch of the Irish Museum of Modern Art in 1991, the construction of Tate Modern in 1997, as well as exploring special collections at The National Gallery, Courtauld… See more details below

Overview

The first edition of Curators and Collections, published in 1997 was based on interviews and features published in the quarterly review: Cv Journal of Art and Crafts (1988-91). These recorded the launch of the Irish Museum of Modern Art in 1991, the construction of Tate Modern in 1997, as well as exploring special collections at The National Gallery, Courtauld Gallery, The British Museum and Royal Photographic Society. The book contained a comprehensive guide to public and private collections in England, Scotland and Wales, which is revised and updated in this volume. The landscape of the arts has radically transformed in the intervening years, with a tremendous growth in audiences for contemporary art. The study recognises the important role of private foundations and the activity of curators and gallerists in their creative initiatives

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781908419613
Publisher:
Cv Publications
Publication date:
09/05/2012
Series:
Cv/Visual Arts Research , #152
Sold by:
Bookwire
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
114
File size:
1 MB

Read an Excerpt

Tate Modern in Construction Interview with project manager Dawn Austwick recorded at Bankside site 1997 The architects Herzog and de Meuron have done their job? They've done the bulk of it, but they stay on site through construction as well. The majority of the work of the design team, in design terms, will be completed by the summer, obviously. There are elements of fit-out that we're not doing yet; for example, the detail of precisely how the educational facilities will look. I mean we know where the lavatories are, where the rooms are, but how we configure those spaces, we will actually leave till a little later. The gallery spaces are where? Levels three, four and five. If I start you at the bottom level one is the entrance area and combines the Turbine Hall, which if you look at those black and white photos, that's it. It is an astonishing space. You're retaining the drama of that aspect? Absolutely, it's even emptier now. It's five hundred feet long, about one hundred feet wide, and one hundred and twenty feet tall. Who spotted it first - Nick Serota? No, actually. This is mythology that predates me. It is said somebody called Francis Carnwath found it, who was the previous administrative director of the Tate. He was sent off to find sites and came back one day to say, 'I've found this extraordinary place, come and look at it.' On level one the Turbine Hall in effect becomes a rather extraordinary covered street. Like an arcade? That kind of downgrades it a little bit, but, absolutely, in that it could be open when the gallery's closed. It could be a grand meeting place. You can get to it from stage one, which is the western entrance. If you're coming from the north you come from a level above. Examining the plans This is looking at the northern entrance, which is on level two. This is level one, the main west entrance. You come down a huge ramp that brings you down to the bottom of the building. All our ticketing and information will be in this area. The whole of this area is the main gallery building, including the schools area, conveniences, shop, all down here. If you come from the north, you come in either side of the chimney, across onto a bridge which runs over, and either come down by the lift or the stairs. In the long run there'll be an entrance from the south, where the big gates are presently. This is an auditorium, cafe and bar area, a film seminar room, the loading bay area and back of house facilities. Here is level three, the first area of galleries with circulation all in the central area, vertically. Escalators run all the way up, and the central staircase. This is a concourse area in effect. The gallery space is basically two wings on each floor; level four and five are all gallery spaces.

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >