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Curiosities of Medical Experience by John Gideon Millingen [Illustrated]
     

Curiosities of Medical Experience by John Gideon Millingen [Illustrated]

by John Gideon Millingen
 
• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• Illustrated book
The great success and correspondent utility of D'Israeli's "Curiosities of Literature," have induced me to add to the ample harvest of that ingenious writer a few gleanings from another field.

Overview

• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• Illustrated book
The great success and correspondent utility of D'Israeli's "Curiosities of Literature," have induced me to add to the ample harvest of that ingenious writer a few gleanings from another field. They may not afford the same amusing variety to the general reader, but they may tend to draw some attention to many important points that affect the chequered lot of mankind. The progress that every science has rapidly made during the last half-century has been astounding, and seems to have kept pace with those struggles of the intellectual faculties to burst from the shackles of prejudice and error that had ignobly bound them for so many ages. Groping in darkness, man sought the light, but unfortunately the sudden refulgence at times dazzled instead of guiding his steps in the pursuit of truth, and led him into errors as perilous as those that had surrounded him in his former mental obscurity. His gigantic powers were aroused, but, too frequently misapplied, they shook the social edifice to its very foundation. The daring hand of innovation destroyed without contemplating what better fabric could be raised on the ruin: and while the nobler faculties with which Providence had gifted us were exerted for the public weal, the baser parts of our passions sought liberty in licentiousness. Ambition degenerated into ferocity, scepticism led to impiety, and even apparent virtue sought to propagate the doctrines of good, by assuming the "goodly outside" of vice. Religion was [Pg viii]overthrown because priestcraft had deceived, and high rank was held up to detestation because princes and nobles had been corrupt; and to use Shakespeare's words,

Thus we debase
The nature of our seats, and make the rabble
Call our cares, fears; which will in time break ope
The lock o' the senate, and bring in the crows
To peck the eagles.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013900547
Publisher:
Unforgotten Classics
Publication date:
03/08/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
974 KB

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