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Curriculum Connections Through The Library

Overview

Educators have wrestled with the delineation of important curriculum content for decades. What is important, and how can the school library help? Written by well-known educators and school librarians, this new work—the second in the Principles and Practice Series—explores educational principles and research, and connects national curriculum trends to current library practice. The book features eleven chapters, illustrated throughout with tables and figures. Each chapter explains major concepts and standards ...

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Overview

Educators have wrestled with the delineation of important curriculum content for decades. What is important, and how can the school library help? Written by well-known educators and school librarians, this new work—the second in the Principles and Practice Series—explores educational principles and research, and connects national curriculum trends to current library practice. The book features eleven chapters, illustrated throughout with tables and figures. Each chapter explains major concepts and standards involved with curriculum development, instruction, and assessment, and presents real-life examples of effective practice.

An essential compendium filled with research and best practice, this volume provides important insight into the underlying principles of successful teaching and learning in the school library media center. Educators and library practitioners will gain a better understanding of the library media center's pivotal role and learn how best to empower students to become independent and lifelong learners.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
According to the editors, "The purpose of this book is twofold: to provide sound educational principles to inform practice in our schools and to illustrate examples of effective practice to inform future educational research." The chapters, written by educators and school librarians, are organized into four sections: building independent learners, mapping the curriculum, teaching and assessing, and creating collaborative learning communities. The focus is on how school library media specialists can be literacy leaders and curriculum developers, and the real-life examples help make clear how this can be accomplished. YA librarians will be particularly interested in "Promoting Young Adult Literacy: A Role for School Library Media Specialists," by Sandra Hughes-Hassell, with its helpful summary of research on YA reading and writing and implications for libraries. Suggestions include creating an inviting library space for teens, advocating for free reading time during the school day, and providing YAs with strategies for understanding texts. For library and education schools, and for practitioners as well. (Principles and Practices Series). KLIATT Codes: P—Recommended. 2003, Libraries Unltd, 230p. bibliogs. index., Ages adult.
—Paula Rohrlick
School Library Journal
The authors of this book believe that school librarians, in collaboration with other educators, play a pivotal role in creating independent learners. They have chosen numerous, thought-provoking essays that sample existing scholarship and direct professionals in ways to affect curriculum, collections, and collaboration across disciplines and to aid students who must perform under the scrutiny of the national standards movement. The book contains some suggestions for joint projects, but primarily promotes open-ended, inquiry-based learning. It provides a realistic assessment of why collaboration and serving as a curriculum advisor can be so difficult as well as a good exploration of the motivations for teachers resisting change. The section on curriculum mapping and library-collection management will make many professionals look at resources in new ways. Although there is a bit of repetition in the first section, the writing is clear and purposeful. The well-documented essays contain a number of useful tables. For those who haven't time to regularly survey current library literature about our rapidly changing profession, this can be a useful "catch-up." It is not a cookie-cutter or how-to book, but it is every bit as informative as Stripling's Learning and Libraries in an Information Age (Libraries Unlimited, 1999). A stimulating choice for practicing librarians and students of library science.-Cindy Darling Codell, Clark Middle School, Winchester, KY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781563089732
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/30/2003
  • Series: Principles and Practice Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

BARBARA K. STRIPLING is currently Director of Library Programs for New Visions for Public Schools, a local education fund in New York City. She has been a classroom teacher of English and drama, a school library media specialist for grades K-12, Library Power Director in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and a Director of Instructional Services for the Fayetteville, Arkansas, public schools. She is the auhtor or editor of three books: Braistorms and Blueprints: Teaching Library Research as a Thinking Process, Libraries for the National Education Goals, and Learning and Libraries in an Information Age: Principles and Practice. She is a former president of the American Association of School Librarians and is currently serving on the Executive Board of the American Library Association.

SANDRA HUGHES-HASSELL is Assistant Professor in the College of Information Science & Technology at Drexel University. In her 20-year career, she has also been an elementary school teacher, a school library media specialist, and director of the Philadelphia Library Power Project. In her current research and teaching, she focuses on resources and services to youth and the instructional role of the information specialist. She is currently co-principal investigator on a 2002 National Leadership Grant focused on understanding the information-seeking behavior of urban young adults.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Inquiry-Based Learning 3
2 Empowered Learning: Fostering Thinking Across the Curriculum 41
3 Literacy Learning in the Elementary School: Implications for School Library Media Specialists 67
4 Promoting Young Adult Literacy: A Role for School Library Media Specialists 89
5 Librarian Morphs into Curriculum Developer 107
6 Curriculum Mapping and Collection Mapping: Otherwise Known as "The Camel with Two Humps" 119
7 Modeling Recursion in Research Process Instruction 141
8 Assessment for Learning 157
9 Building Learning Communities Using Technology 171
10 The Role of Libraries in Learning Communities 189
11 Collaboration and Leadership 199
Index 221
About the Editors and Contributors 227
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