Curt Flood Story

Curt Flood Story

by Stuart L. Weiss
     
 

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  Curt Flood, former star center fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, is a hero to many for selflessly sacrificing his career to challenge the legality of baseball’s reserve system. Although he lost his case before the Supreme Court, he has become for many a martyr in the eventually successful battle for free agency. Sportswriters and fans alike

Overview

  Curt Flood, former star center fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, is a hero to many for selflessly sacrificing his career to challenge the legality of baseball’s reserve system. Although he lost his case before the Supreme Court, he has become for many a martyr in the eventually successful battle for free agency. Sportswriters and fans alike have helped to paint a picture of Flood as a larger-than-life figure, a portrait that, unhappily, cannot stand closer inspection. This book reveals the real Curt Flood—more man than myth.

            Flood stirred up a hornet’s nest by refusing to be traded from the Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies after the 1969 season, arguing that Major League Baseball’s reserve system reduced him to the status of bondage. Flood decided to resist a system in which his contract could be traded without his consent and in which he was not at liberty to negotiate his services in an open market. Stuart Weiss examines the man behind the decision, exploring the span of Flood’s life and shedding light on his relationships with those who helped shape his determination to sue baseball and providing a new perspective on the lawsuit that found its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

            Although a superb player, Flood was known to be temperamental and sensitive; in suing Major League Baseball he transformed his grievances against the Cardinals front office into an attack on how the business of big-league ball was conducted. Weiss shows that Flood was far from the stereotypical “dumb jock” but was rather a proud, multifaceted black man in a business run by white moguls. By illuminating Flood’s private side, rarely seen by the public, he reveals how Flood misled a gullible press on a regular basis and how his 1971 memoir, The Way It Is, didn’t tell it the way it really was.

            Drawing on previously untapped sources, Weiss examines more fully and deeply than other writers the complexities of Flood’s decision to pursue his lawsuit—and demonstrates that the picture of Flood as a martyr for free agency is a myth. He suggests why, of all the players traded or sold through the years, it was Flood who brought this challenge. Weiss also explains how Flood’s battle against the reserve system cannot be understood in isolation from the personal experiences that precipitated it, such as his youth in a dysfunctional home, his troubled first marriage, his financial problems, and his unwavering commitment to the Cardinals.

            The Curt Flood Story is a realistic account of an eloquent man who presented a warm, even vulnerable, face to the public as well as to friends, while hiding his inner furies. It shows that Flood was neither a hero nor a martyr but a victim of unique circumstances and his own life.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Weiss has written a fine, passionate biography.”--Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly

With his wiry frame and stern countenance, Curt Flood is the storied Cardinals center fielder who became a 1960s civil rights cause célèbre; however, a hagiographic shroud has enveloped Flood, making accurate assessment of his legacy difficult. This last year has seen three Flood biographies, and there is good reason to believe that Weiss, a history professor (The President's Man) who takes a skeptical position toward Flood, has produced one of the most enlightening. Angered over being traded to the Phillies in 1969, Flood responded by suing Major League Baseball to do away with the reserve clause (which permitted the teams to "own" the players in perpetuity), which would secure him the right to negotiate freely with other teams. Flood's case went to the Supreme Court, where he lost. Behind the bland title lurks a carefully researched and cogently reasoned account. Weiss, unafraid to ruffle a few feathers, shows that, far from being motivated solely by high ideals, Flood's decision to sue arose out of financial and familial turmoil and wounded pride. Flood later turned himself into a sort of professional victim, exaggerating the racial strife of his Oakland boyhood and papering over his alcoholism and unpaid child support bills. Weiss has written a fine, passionate biography. (June)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826217400
Publisher:
University of Missouri Press
Publication date:
06/28/2007
Series:
Sports and American Culture Series , #1
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

Stuart L. Weiss, Professor Emeritus of History at Southern Illinois University–Edwardsville, is author of The President’s Man: Leo Crowley and Franklin Roosevelt in Peace and War. He resides in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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