Curtiss P-40: Snub-nosed Kittyhawks and Warhawks

Curtiss P-40: Snub-nosed Kittyhawks and Warhawks

by Carl Molesworth, Adam Tooby, Richard Chasemore
     
 

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An improved version of the Allison V-1710 engine gave rise to the Curtiss H-87, which began life in 1941 as the P-40D and featured a completely redesigned fuselage. The shorter and deeper nose of the new fighter gave it a decidedly snub-nosed appearance compared to the earlier P-40 models. Curtiss continued to tweak the H-87 for the next two years in the search for

Overview

An improved version of the Allison V-1710 engine gave rise to the Curtiss H-87, which began life in 1941 as the P-40D and featured a completely redesigned fuselage. The shorter and deeper nose of the new fighter gave it a decidedly snub-nosed appearance compared to the earlier P-40 models. Curtiss continued to tweak the H-87 for the next two years in the search for better performance, but the last major version, the P-40N, was only marginally faster than the first. In the process, Curtiss even tried an engine change to the Packard Merlin in the P-40F and L but to no avail. What the late model P-40s lacked in speed and service ceiling, they traded for maneuverability, durability and availability. Their niche became fighter-bomber operations, and they fought on fronts as varied as the arctic wastes of the Aleutian Islands and Iceland, the steaming jungles of the South Pacific and the barren deserts of North Africa. P-40s were a common sight in the skies over Burma and China, Sicily and Italy, and western Russia as well. By the time production ceased in 1944, Curtiss had produced nearly 14,000 P-40s.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781472807069
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
11/20/2013
Series:
Air Vanguard , #11
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
403,713
File size:
7 MB

Meet the Author

Carl Molesworth has specialized in producing unit histories for the USAAF fighter groups of the CBI since the 1980s, interviewing surviving veterans from these little-publicised units.
Richard Chasemore finished a four-year course in technical illustration in 1992. Since then he has worked on a huge variety of projects in publishing and advertising, using both traditional and digital media. He has run an airbrush course in St Louis, Mis

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