Customer Orientation and Market Action / Edition 1

Customer Orientation and Market Action / Edition 1

by Michael D. Johnson
     
 

ISBN-10: 0133286673

ISBN-13: 9780133286670

Pub. Date: 06/17/1997

Publisher: Pearson Education

In Customer Orientation and Market Action Johnson provides a rigorous yet practical introduction to customers in today's marketplace. By integrating research and application, the book helps both students and practitioners gain valuable insights into consumer characteristics and needs, and use these insights to improve business decisions.

Overview

In Customer Orientation and Market Action Johnson provides a rigorous yet practical introduction to customers in today's marketplace. By integrating research and application, the book helps both students and practitioners gain valuable insights into consumer characteristics and needs, and use these insights to improve business decisions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780133286670
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
06/17/1997
Pages:
183
Product dimensions:
7.02(w) x 9.23(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART I: CUSTOMER ORIENTATION AND MARKET ACTION 1(40)
CHAPTER 1 A Customer Orientation
1(11)
Taking a Customer Orientation
2(2)
The Three Goals of a Customer Orientation
2(2)
Challenges
4(3)
Customer Orientation as a Shared Vision
5(1)
Customer Orientation as a Leadership Perspective
6(1)
Customer Orientation Myopia
6(1)
Organizational and Structural Barriers
6(1)
A Lack of Gestalt: Understanding the "Whole Picture"
7(1)
An Integrated Approach
7(2)
Customer Orientation, Market Orientation, and Total Quality Management
9(1)
Summary
10(1)
Discussion Questions
11(1)
CHAPTER 2 Market Action
12(14)
Manager's Information Needs
12(3)
Market Strategy Decisions
12(1)
Monitoring-Based Market Action Decisions
13(1)
Problem-Driven Market Action Decisions
14(1)
The Four Phases of Customer Orientation
15(3)
Phase I: Customer Strategy and Focus
15(1)
Phase II: Customer Satisfaction Measurement
16(1)
Phase III: Analysis and Priority Setting
16(1)
Phase IV: Implementation
17(1)
The Transformation of Sweden Post
18(5)
The Transformation Process
19(1)
The Measurement Process
20(3)
Sweden Post: Lessons Learned
23(1)
Summary
24(1)
Discussion Questions
25(1)
CHAPTER 3 Understanding and Anticipating Customer Needs
26(15)
The Goal of Customer Research
26(1)
Reactive Research
27(3)
Proactive Research and the Information Pyramid
30(9)
History and Cultural Factors
32(1)
Unobtrusive or Nonreactive Measures
33(1)
Value Segmentation
33(3)
Laddering
36(2)
Comparing Noncomparables
38(1)
Projective Techniques
38(1)
Summary
39(1)
Discussion Questions
40(1)
PART II: THE PURCHASE AND CONSUMPTION EXPERIENCE 41(102)
CHAPTER 4 The Customer Experience Model
41(11)
Customer Acquisition and Retention
41(5)
Satisfaction, Retention, and Profits
43(3)
The Customer Experience Model
46(3)
Disney's Customer Orbit
48(1)
Four Customer Types
49(2)
Summary
51(1)
Discussion Questions
51(1)
CHAPTER 5 Customers in the Marketplace
52(16)
Roots in Economic Theory
52(4)
Normative and Predictive Models
53(3)
From Caveat Emptor to the Federal Trade Commission: The Changing Information Environment
56(2)
Types of Market Information
57(1)
Learning in the Marketplace: The Nature of Expectations
58(4)
Expectation Models
58(2)
The Nature of Expectations: Adaptation and Aggregation
60(2)
Customer Satisfaction in the Marketplace: The Matching of Supply and Demand
62(3)
Customer Dissatisfaction in the Marketplace: Exit or Voice?
65(1)
Summary
66(1)
Discussion Questions
67(1)
CHAPTER 6 Customer Information Processing
68(18)
The Vehicle Purchase Process
69(2)
The Information Processing Paradigm
71(14)
Limited Resources
72(1)
Attention and Involvement
73(1)
Perception and Cognitive Representations
74(5)
Information Acquisition and Memory
79(4)
Categorization
83(2)
Summary
85(1)
Discussion Questions
85(1)
CHAPTER 7 Customer Choice
86(16)
Choice Strategies
86(5)
Brand-Level Choice
86(4)
Category-Level Choice
90(1)
Noncomparable Choice
90(1)
Price, Quality, and Value
91(1)
Risky Choice: Heuristics and Framing Effects
92(3)
The Howard Model
95(5)
Extensive Problem Solving
95(1)
Limited Problem Solving
96(1)
Routinized Response Behavior
96(1)
Management over the Life Cycle
97(1)
Cascading Strategies
98(2)
Summary
100(1)
Discussion Questions
101(1)
CHAPTER 8 Customer Satisfaction and Priority Setting
102(27)
A Customer Satisfaction Framework
103(1)
The Psychology of Customer Satisfaction
104(8)
The Disconfirmation Model
105(2)
The Performance Model
107(2)
Which Model to Use?
109(1)
When Are Expectations Important?
110(2)
Building a Customer Satisfaction Measurement System
112(2)
Elements of a Customer Satisfaction Model
114(5)
The Consequences of Satisfaction
115(1)
Price as a Satisfaction Driver
115(1)
Estimating Importance Weights
116(3)
Priority Setting
119(2)
Bridging Internal and External Quality
120(1)
Customer Satisfaction at Cathay Pacific
121(3)
Customer Satisfaction at DrainCo
124(3)
Summary
127(1)
Discussion Questions
128(1)
CHAPTER 9 Macro Satisfaction and Firm Strategy
129(14)
The Development of National Satisfaction Indices
129(3)
The ACSI Methodology
130(2)
1994 Baseline Index Results and General Comparisons
132(2)
Global Competition in the Automobile Industry
134(4)
Time Trends in the SCSB
138(1)
Summary
139(1)
Challenges for the Auto Industry
139(2)
Discussion Questions
141(2)
PART III: IMPLEMENTATION AND QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 143(30)
CHAPTER 10 Customer Orientation and the Design Function
143(13)
Two Schools of Design
143(5)
The Functionalist School of Design
144(1)
Design as an Aesthetic Tool
145(1)
Which School to Follow?
146(2)
Evolutionary Product Design
148(1)
Revolutionary Product Design
148(3)
Laddering, Value Projection, and Reverse Laddering
149(1)
Product Concepts
150(1)
Service Design
151(3)
Summary
154(1)
Discussion Questions
155(1)
CHAPTER 11 From Customer Satisfaction to Quality Improvement
156(17)
Implementing the Four Phases of Customer Orientation
156(3)
Phase I: Customer Strategy and Focus
157(1)
Phase II: Customer Satisfaction Measurement
158(1)
Phase III: Analysis and Priority Setting
158(1)
Phase IV: Implementation
159(1)
Quality Function Deployment
159(5)
The House of Quality
161(3)
Phases 2, 3, and 4
164(1)
Bridging the Quality-Satisfaction Gap
164(5)
Customer Needs as Benefits versus Attributes
166(1)
Benefit and Attribute Importance
166(1)
Benchmarking and Priority Setting
167(1)
Method Myopia
168(1)
Summary
169(1)
Going Forward
170(1)
Discussion Questions
171(2)
Index 173

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