Cut Short (Geraldine Steel Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the tradition of Ruth Rendell, Lynda La Plante, Frances Fyfield, and Barbara Vine, Cut Short is a gripping psychological thriller that introduces Detective Inspector Geraldine Steel, a woman whose past is threatening to collide with her future.

D.I. Geraldine Steel relocates to the quiet rural town of Woolsmarsh, thinking she’s found a restful place where she can battle ...

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Cut Short (Geraldine Steel Series #1)

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Overview

In the tradition of Ruth Rendell, Lynda La Plante, Frances Fyfield, and Barbara Vine, Cut Short is a gripping psychological thriller that introduces Detective Inspector Geraldine Steel, a woman whose past is threatening to collide with her future.

D.I. Geraldine Steel relocates to the quiet rural town of Woolsmarsh, thinking she’s found a restful place where she can battle her demons in private. But when she finds herself pitted against a twisted killer preying on young local women in the park, she quickly discovers how wrong she is ...

When an unwitting bystander comes forward as a witness, she quickly becomes the murderer’s next obsession. And Geraldine Steel is locked in a race against time, determined to find the killer before yet another victim is discovered. But can she save the lives of the town’s young women—or will Geraldine herself become the killer’s ultimate trophy?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This tense and compelling narrative introduces an extraordinary new mystery protagonist. Escaping a failed relationship, Det. Insp. Geraldine Steel moves to a smaller town, which she hopes will have smaller problems. Instead she's put in charge of investigating a young woman's brutal murder. Her co-workers are alternately supportive and cynical, skeptical of her quick rise to the top, but Geraldine doesn't have time to worry about that when two more young women are found dead in the same manner and location and the prime suspect is eliminated. Geraldine's hunt for the severely disturbed killer soon makes her a target. A wide variety of characters come seamlessly together to advance the fast-paced, twisty narrative. Russell paints a careful and intriguing portrait of a small British community while developing a compassionate and complex heroine who's sure to win fans. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

"A stylish, top-of-the-line crime tale, a seamless blending of psychological sophistication and gritty police procedure. And you're just plain going to love DI Geraldine Steel."  —Jeffery Deaver, author, Roadside Crosses

"This tense and compelling narrative introduces an extraordinary new mystery protagonist. . . . Russell paints a careful and intriguing portrait of a small British community while developing a compassionate and complex heroine who's sure to win fans."   —Publishers Weekly starred review 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062325594
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/26/2013
  • Series: Geraldine Steel Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 6,387
  • File size: 589 KB

Meet the Author

Leigh Russell is the award-winning author of the Geraldine Steel and Ian Peterson mysteries. She is an English teacher who lives in the UK with her family.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 12, 2014

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings What started wi

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings

    What started with a few short choppy chapters where not enough information was given became an interesting string of crime, but way too many characters to keep straight.  A DI Steel was at the heart of the investigation and could possibly be named the main character, but this cast of characters was ridiculous and really hard to remember all the moving parts.

    Thankfully amongst the cast of characters, the killer was introduced early, the reader was just waiting for the police to connect the crimes and find the killer.  The interesting part was trying to find out the motive behind the killer while the police were looking for the culprit.  Although, I believe some of their policing skills weren't up to par, I am not a professional (but I do live with one) so I thought maybe they should have done a better job in their police work at a few of the key moments. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2011

    Good start and likeable characters but...

    This debut book from Leigh Russell has all the ingredients of an excellent British procedural and it sets the correct by following time-honored formulas. However, in the last third of the book, there are a couple of large gaps in logic and intelligence from the principal characters that really annoyed me. For example, if a witness receives a death threat from a known missing serial killer and reports it you would think that at least one policeman would be assigned to protect her AND you would think that she would tell her own husband. Well, not in Miss Russell's universe. I may read the next Leigh Russell novel because it was entertaining but if the glaring inconsistencies continue then it will probably be the last one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Why, not who

    Leigh Russell's CUT SHORT is a book I had to read in one sitting. The first chapter is titled "Goodbye" and so an end is the beginning of this excellent new series. DI Geraldine Steel, a member of the Murder Investigation Unit, is just moving into her new apartment when she is called to Lyceum Park where a body has just been found in the bushes. The body is that of Angela Waters, a woman in her early 20's with long blonde hair. Soon the bodies of other women are found, all sharing the same characteristics and panic in Woolsmarsh ensues.The identity of the killer is learned very early on. His intelligence is on the low end of the spectrum and he is a paranoid schizophrenic. A woman responds to an appeal for people who were in the park at the time of the murder and Heather Spencer, a teacher at a secondary school, reports that a man she saw had a scar on his upper lip, a man who seemed to be talking to himself or an to an unseen partner in the conversation.DI Steel is assigned to listen to the messages from the public who call with information, all of which is seemingly irrelevant to the case. To add to Geraldine's problems she is being stalked by someone whose appearance is vaguely familiar.The author slowly introduces the members of the Murder Investigation Unit, creating three dimensional characters and leading the reader be believe that these are characters we will get to know well. Geraldiine has been on the fast promotion track but she knows that this can work against her as well.Giving the park the name "lyceum" suggests that the author is playing with the reader. In modern terms, "lyceum" refers to secondary schools, particularly those in Europe. In classical terms, the lyceum in Athens was a public meeting place in a grove named after the god of the grove, Apollo Lyceus. Secondary schools play a big part in the story and the discovery of the bodies takes place in a grove, the city park that has stong influence on the psyche of the killer.Everything in the book, from characters to the titles of the chapters move the reader along to a satisfying conclusion. This is an author worth meeting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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