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Cybrarian's Manual

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Whether you call yourself librarian or cybrarian, chances are you are facing the Digital Vastness with some anxiety. Now comes the complete manual for navigating library services in the new millennium. Written by the top infonauts in the field, The Cybrarian's Manual is both a tool for getting your bearings and a daily source of insight, information, and inspiration as you move ahead. One of the best ways to master the Net is to draw on friendly colleagues for tips, resources, and ideas. In The Cybrarian's Manual...
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Overview

Whether you call yourself librarian or cybrarian, chances are you are facing the Digital Vastness with some anxiety. Now comes the complete manual for navigating library services in the new millennium. Written by the top infonauts in the field, The Cybrarian's Manual is both a tool for getting your bearings and a daily source of insight, information, and inspiration as you move ahead. One of the best ways to master the Net is to draw on friendly colleagues for tips, resources, and ideas. In The Cybrarian's Manual you'll find these colleagues amiable, engaging, and generous in sharing their experiences. They were gathered by editor Pat Ensor, head of Information Services at the University of Houston Libraries and herself a pioneering cybrarian.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Actually more of a guide than a manual, this work takes a comprehensive approach to presenting the state of libraries and cyberspace. Topics discussed include access options, staying current, expert systems, censorship, reference services, multimedia, HTML, VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language), evaluating and citing Internet resources, network licensing, basic UNIX commands, cyberpunk literature, and future applications such as nanotechnology. The authoritative contributors, such as William Britten, Steve Hardin, Barbara Quint, Louis Rosenfeld, and Ed Valauskas, all give an overview of their topics and list Internet and print resources for further information. Several of the contributions are reprints but have been updated with new material and resources when necessary. This book will be useful to those librarians who are looking for an overview of library issues and applications in cyberspace and not a "how-to" manual. The intended audience is stated as intermediate; however, the depth of treatment overall is not too deep for the eager beginner. Those looking for a more concentrated hands-on approach should also consider Diane Kovac's The Cybrarian's Guide to Developing Successful Internet Programs and Services (Professional Reading, LJ 5/1/97). A web site that will list any updates to the book's theme has been created. However, as experienced cybrarians have come to expect, the address cited in the book is already outdated and takes one to a referral page for the new address. Information on this book, including a table of contents, can be found, at least for now, at .Robert Battenfeld, Long Island Univ.-Southampton Lib., N.Y.
School Library Journal
Pat Ensor has done a yeoman's job of pulling together 63 original and previously published articles on what librarians need to know about the Internet, including connection options, browsers, and security. At its most basic level, the book exists, like windshield wipers, to clear away the muck that gets in the way of understanding the Net: after reading "Using Multimedia File Formats" by OhioLINK's Thomas Dowling, you'll be able to casually discuss GIF, JPEG, and TIFF at your next cocktail party. The book also succeeds in its mission to lead readers to valuable resources on the Web, such as sites for citation styles, web site development, and must-read publications. Despite these virtues, the collection doesn't sing as a whole. Some articles discuss topics on which I'd want a whole book, such as "Spinning the World Wide Web: An HTML Primer." Others are starting to show their age, such as "Intelligent Agents," from a 1994 issue of Online. Ensor, Head of Information Services at the University of Houston Libraries, recognizes that the static nature of the book calls for a web site, and there is one: www.ala.org/editions/cyberlib.net/. However, as a library-oriented site, it's disappointing: as of early May, there was no software to search the text. The aforementioned drawbacks, plus the collection's academic bent, make it an op- tional purchase.Rene Olson, School Library Journal
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780838906934
  • Publisher: American Library Association
  • Publication date: 2/28/1997
  • Series: ALA Editions Series
  • Pages: 472
  • Product dimensions: 7.01 (w) x 9.83 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
The Usual Internet General Information and History 3
Check These Out Regularly 5
Organizations Cybrarians Should Knowledge About 7
Internet Size and Growth 9
The American Public, the Public Library, and the Internet: An Ever-Evolving Partnership 21
Internet Access Options for Libraries 34
It's Time to Ask [Alternate] Dr. Internet! 45
Your Hardware Platform for Internet Access: LANs and SLIP/PPP Connections 47
It's Time Once Again to Ask [Alternate] Dr. Internet! 60
Wireless and Ubiquitous Computing 62
Colleagues in Cyberspace: A Guide to Using Mailing Lists 75
Usenet and the Library 83
Urban Legends and Hoaxes on the Internet 90
Access to Electronic Information, Services, and Networks: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights 95
Crime and Punishment in Cyberspace 98
The Communications Decency Act 104
It's Time Once Again to Ask [Alternate] Dr. Internet! 106
A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace 108
Security and Authentication 111
Intelligent Agents: Software Servants for an Electronic Information World (and More!) 115
Clarence Meets Alcuin, or, Expert Systems Are Still an Option in Reference Work 127
The Cybrarian's Tool Kit 137
Browsers, Extensions, and the Kitchen Junk Drawer 144
It's Time Once Again to Ask [Alternate] Dr. Internet! 152
Searching Cyberspace 154
Welcome to the Hololib 165
Inquiring Minds Want to Know...UNIX 172
Information Retrieval: The Client/Server Model and Libraries 183
Webmaster Beware: Corporations Know They Need a Web Site...but Do They Know Why? 193
Spinning the World-Wide Web: An HTML Primer 196
HTML - Which Version? 206
UW-Madison Campus Libraries' Web Page Standards and Guidelines Electronic Library Access Committee User Documentation Working Group 209
You've Got a Web Page - What Next? 212
Considering Computer-Mediated Communication: The Future Is Now! 214
Using Multimedia File Formats 223
The Digital Library Initiative: Collections in an Electronic World 237
Imaging the Archives: Now Is the Time 239
Reference Services on the Internet 249
OPACs and More 255
Cool or What? Quality and Evaluation 262
Cyber-Citing: Citing Electronic Sources 264
Civic Cybrarianship: Government and the Information SuperHighway Public Lanes 273
Beyond Surfing: Serving Information to Our Patrons 283
Why Can't a User Be More Like a Librarian? 297
Knowbot Explorations in Similarity Space 301
Seven Buttons: A User-Friendly, Patron-Appropriate Technique 309
One World Linked by the Universal Machine 315
There's Nothing New Under the Sun: Or, All New! All Improved! It's Online Searching! 320
Consumer Online Services 324
It's Time Once Again to Ask [Alternate] Dr. Internet! 326
Cataloging the Internet: Issues and Viewpoints 331
How "Healthy" is Your OPAC? 338
Electronic Data Pricing: Or, Through the Looking Glass 343
Zen and the Art of CD-ROM Network License Negotiation 348
Press 1 for Vendor Relations 354
Information Standards 365
Uniform Resource Names: A Progress Report 368
SGML Documents: A Better System for Communicating Knowledge 375
Technologies Change Organizational and Occupational Structures: Librarian, Cybrarian, or ? 385
What Is Cyberspace? 395
Using the Internet for Promoting Your Skills and Services: Two Basic Techniques 404
Nanotechnology: The Library of Congress in Your Pocket 411
Reference Services in the Virtual Library 418
Cyberpunk: Information as God 426
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