Cycles of Child Maltreatment: Facts, Fallacies and Interventions

Cycles of Child Maltreatment: Facts, Fallacies and Interventions

by Ann Buchanan
     
 
Although most families do not repeat the patterns of abuse of their childhood, there is evidence that, for whatever reason, substantial numbers do. This book explores continuing intergenerational cycles of child maltreatment and the controversies that surround the theories, focusing mainly on physical abuse, neglect, and emotional abuse, rather than sexual abuse.

Overview

Although most families do not repeat the patterns of abuse of their childhood, there is evidence that, for whatever reason, substantial numbers do. This book explores continuing intergenerational cycles of child maltreatment and the controversies that surround the theories, focusing mainly on physical abuse, neglect, and emotional abuse, rather than sexual abuse. Examining the facts and the fallacies permeating the international literature, the author suggests that in intergenerational child maltreatment, there may not be just one cycle, but four separate cycles: sociopolitical factors; recurring cultural patterns; psychological factors; and biological factors. Interventions need to be focused on each cycle independently to attempt to break the cycle of child maltreatment. Ann Buchanan draws on her wide range of both academic and research experience in this field, as well as on her clinical experience, to bring together both the theories and research in the mechanisms of transmission, and the practical aspects of interventions. The book is easily accessible with clear summaries and will prove an excellent introduction to all those working with children and families.

Editorial Reviews

4 Stars! from Doody
Lisa N. Libman
This book provides a multisystemic explanation of patterns of intergenerational abuse and neglect of children. The author addresses the controversy surrounding the legitimacy and prevalence of intergenerational cycles of abuse before describing four arenas that can seed and perpetuate the cycles of abuse: sociopolitical, cultural, psychological, and biological. The purpose of the book is to educate those involved with child welfare about the multiple vehicles of transmission and resulting multiple cycles of child maltreatment. The need for cycle-specific intervention is stressed and possible interventions are discussed. The book, the second of a new series, The Wiley Series in Child Care and Protection, targets researchers and policymakers in the area of child welfare and professionals involved with service provision to children and families. The book is composed of four parts, each of which is broken down into chapters. All but the introductory and two closing chapters conclude with a point-by-point summary of the main themes presented. Charts and graphs are used appropriately throughout. References are plentiful and represent a wide range of disciplines and topics related to child welfare. The author references journal articles and books published in both the United States and the United Kingdom as well as a number of international publications. This well-organized, very readable book offers a systematic approach to understanding and interrupting the intergenerational cycle of child maltreatment. The book successfully negotiates different theories and perspectives, always with a sensitivity to criticism. In citing international research as well as that of different disciplines,the book attempts to cover a lot of territory and winds up more informed by Western culture than by any other. This caveat notwithstanding, I would recommend purchase by health science libraries and university bookstores.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Lisa N. Libman, BA (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This book provides a multisystemic explanation of patterns of intergenerational abuse and neglect of children. The author addresses the controversy surrounding the legitimacy and prevalence of intergenerational cycles of abuse before describing four arenas that can seed and perpetuate the cycles of abuse: sociopolitical, cultural, psychological, and biological.
Purpose: The purpose of the book is to educate those involved with child welfare about the multiple vehicles of transmission and resulting multiple cycles of child maltreatment. The need for cycle-specific intervention is stressed and possible interventions are discussed.
Audience: The book, the second of a new series, The Wiley Series in Child Care and Protection, targets researchers and policymakers in the area of child welfare and professionals involved with service provision to children and families.
Features: The book is composed of four parts, each of which is broken down into chapters. All but the introductory and two closing chapters conclude with a point-by-point summary of the main themes presented. Charts and graphs are used appropriately throughout. References are plentiful and represent a wide range of disciplines and topics related to child welfare. The author references journal articles and books published in both the United States and the United Kingdom as well as a number of international publications.
Assessment: This well-organized, very readable book offers a systematic approach to understanding and interrupting the intergenerational cycle of child maltreatment. The book successfully negotiates different theories and perspectives, always with a sensitivity to criticism. In citing international research as well as that of different disciplines, the book attempts to cover a lot of territory and winds up more informed by Western culture than by any other. This caveat notwithstanding, I would recommend purchase by health science libraries and university bookstores.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471958895
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/15/1996
Series:
Wiley Series in Child Care & Protection Series, #5
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.77(d)

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