Cycling Anatomy

Cycling Anatomy

3.4 5
by Shannon Sovndal
     
 

ISBN-10: 0736075879

ISBN-13: 9780736075879

Pub. Date: 05/04/2009

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers

See what it takes to maximize cycling power, speed, and endurance! Cycling Anatomy will show you how to improve your performance by increasing muscular strength and optimizing the efficiency of every movement.

Cycling Anatomy features 74 of the most effective cycling exercises, each with clear, step-by-step descriptions

Overview

See what it takes to maximize cycling power, speed, and endurance! Cycling Anatomy will show you how to improve your performance by increasing muscular strength and optimizing the efficiency of every movement.

Cycling Anatomy features 74 of the most effective cycling exercises, each with clear, step-by-step descriptions and full-color anatomical illustrations highlighting the primary muscles in action.

Cycling Anatomy goes beyond exercises by placing you on the bike and into the throes of competition. Illustrations of the active muscles involved in cornering, climbing, descending, and sprinting show you how the exercises are fundamentally linked to cycling performance. From steep inclines to slick terrains, Cycling Anatomy will ensure you're prepared for any challenge that comes your way.

You'll also learn how to modify exercises to target specific areas, reduce muscle tension, and minimize common cycling injuries. You'll also learn ways to pull it all together to develop a training based on your individual needs and goals.

Whether you're training for an upcoming century ride or just want to top that killer hill with strength to spare, Cycling Anatomy will make sure you get the most out of every ride.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780736075879
Publisher:
Human Kinetics Publishers
Publication date:
05/04/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
200
Sales rank:
1,135,710
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Exercise Finder
Foreword

Chapter 1. The Cyclist in Motion
Chapter 2. Arms
Chapter 3. Neck and Shoulders
Chapter 4. Chest
Chapter 5. Back
Chapter 6. Abdomen
Chapter 7. Legs: Muscle Isolation
Chapter 8. Legs: Complete Power
Chapter 9. Whole-Body Training for Cycling

About the Author

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Cycling Anatomy 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You don't need to be a competitive cyclist to enjoy and appreciate the illustrations, exercises, and advice in this full-color book. I know that, the older I get, the shorter my rides have become because my arms tire more easily and well, my butt gets sore! This book is full of great exercises to help me get in better shape so that I can enjoy my rides and stay out longer. With chapters for legs, arms, abdomen, shoulders/neck (my favorite), chest, and back you're sure to find what you need to to improve your strength, speed, and/or endurance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I use the the book as a supplemental reference book in planning my off-season weight and core training in conjunction with Joe Friel's Cycling Training Bible. Cycling Anatomy illustrates the muscles used in various exercises and cross-references them to illustrations of the same muscles while on the bike. The illustrations are clear and easy to see the muscles identified.
Guest More than 1 year ago
OK, in theory, I suppose it is true that every muscle is either "used on the bike," or it counters and balances a muscle "used on the bike," or it's part of the "core musculature that stabilizes the body." However, as a result, this book essentially lists every single muscle group, and some excercise you can do for it in the gym. It also provides a picture of a person on a bike, highlighting those muscles. And then it adds, "you can't turn the pedals if you're not breathing well" or "you can't ride hard if your core isn't strong" or some other platitude. I was hoping for something much more bike (or bike injury, or bike-training) specific, but really, the bike aspect is mostly packaging. The exercises are no doubt useful, but they're nothing you wouldn't get from a more general "conditioning" book, or from watching other people at the gym. Only occasionally are there hints about certain exercises being useful to prevent certain injuries, or remedy a specific cycling weakness. There are no charts connecting goals to exercises.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago