Cynthia Ann Parker: The Story of Her Capture at the Massacre of the Inmates of Parker's Fort; of her Quarter of a Century Spent Among the Comanches, as the Wife of the War Chief, Peta Nocona; and of her Recapture ..[SPECIAL ILLUSTRATED EDITION] [NOOK Book]

Overview

Cynthia Ann Parker : The Story of Her Capture at the Massacre of the Inmates of Parker's Fort; of her Quarter of a Century Spent Among the Comanches, as the Wife of the War Chief, Peta Nocona; and of her Recapture at the battle of Pease River, by Captain L.S. Ross, of the Texian Rangers (1886)[SPECIAL ILLUSTRATED EDITION]
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Cynthia Ann Parker: The Story of Her Capture at the Massacre of the Inmates of Parker's Fort; of her Quarter of a Century Spent Among the Comanches, as the Wife of the War Chief, Peta Nocona; and of her Recapture ..[SPECIAL ILLUSTRATED EDITION]

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Overview

Cynthia Ann Parker : The Story of Her Capture at the Massacre of the Inmates of Parker's Fort; of her Quarter of a Century Spent Among the Comanches, as the Wife of the War Chief, Peta Nocona; and of her Recapture at the battle of Pease River, by Captain L.S. Ross, of the Texian Rangers (1886)[SPECIAL ILLUSTRATED EDITION]
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013822993
  • Publisher: VARIETY BOOKS
  • Publication date: 12/31/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 413,268
  • File size: 7 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Heard the book

    While traveling. The authur begins with the small number of white settlers who lived dangerously close to the Coumanches. They were not a large enough group to encounter Indians, especially the Coumanches. The Coumanches had little contact with other Indian tribes, retaining their Old World heritage and build. They looked much as they did when they crossed the Berring Straight and did not intermarry with other tribes. They were fierce, more robust, insular and had no contact with whites. They were angry that white people were pushing further into their territory. After slaughtering many in the family fort they carried away two girls, one only nine and her teenage aunt the girl was young enough to totally assimilate, in time marrying a respected and young cheif, but her aunt had to claw her way within a tribal, working hard as their slave. This woman fought with the daughter of that family, won, and gained a better standing, but she always wanted to escape. She talked some traders into taking her with them, but her passage home was horrendous, thru bad weather and endless hardship. Her young neice found her identity among the Coumanches, had three children, the oldest a boy of twelve who witnessed his mother and little sister being captured by white soldiers. This is not your usual superficial tale but a complex and very moving account of how the feeling of belonging to a people, either Indian or white, is irrevocable.. For the younger girl, there was no returning to the ways of the whites. The remainder of the book deals with her Coumanche son, and his own assimilation into white culture after the defeat of the Coumanches, who he lead. Highly recommended for its subple grasp of individuals caught in the cross currents of two distiinctly different ways of life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 12, 2012

    Thought-provoking look at early west

    Some comments & remarks in this book are politically incorrect by today's standards. The black & white photos included are very striking but with the exception of Miss Parker, they are not captioned so you don't know who the people were, where they were, or what relation they were to Miss Parker or other tribes. I encountered some "glitches" in the book itself, although I am unsure if I was at fault or it is within the book itself. For example; the first few pages of Chapter II repeated themselves several times and I had to use the Reading Tools Menu page finder to advance past the duplications and continue reading without interruption. Also some of the photos repeated themselves over & over and I resolved this using the page finder also. All that being said, I liked the book. It did leave me more curious & eager to learn more and to me that is a good thing. Therefore I give it 4 stars.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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