A Cynthia Ozick Reader

A Cynthia Ozick Reader

by Cynthia Ozick
     
 

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Cynthia Ozick is on anybody's list of the ten most important writers in North American today. But she has yet to have her 'break out' book or to achieve anything that remotely approaches a readership commensurate with her talent. This Reader seeks to bring her manifold talents to a wider audience. The poems, stories, and essays in this collection exemplify the

Overview

Cynthia Ozick is on anybody's list of the ten most important writers in North American today. But she has yet to have her 'break out' book or to achieve anything that remotely approaches a readership commensurate with her talent. This Reader seeks to bring her manifold talents to a wider audience. The poems, stories, and essays in this collection exemplify the energy and capaciousness that characterize her imagination.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
These two collections reflect the imaginative, inventive, and insightful Ozick. Some of the best of Ozick as poet, essayist, and fiction writer is represented in A Cynthia Ozick Reader, including the poems "Greeks," "The Fish in the Net," and "When That with Tragic Rapture Moses Stood" and the short stories "Envy," "Virility," and "Puttermesser and Xanthippe." Besides seven poems and seven fiction pieces, including a selection from Ozick's epic novel, Trust, there are eight provocative essays taken from her previous collections, focusing on the secret humanness underlying the literary lives of Virginia Woolf and Edith Wharton, the demise of a literary culture, classical vs. modern feminism, and her cherished Henry James. This anthology is a good introduction to the range of styles, themes, and ideas in her writing. Essayist Ozick shines further in Fame & Folly, a new collection of 17 typically provocative, sometimes witty essays. Most of these focus on the various life experiences, foibles, and follies of selected literary figures. In the first essay, "T.S. Eliot at 101," Ozick reflects on how Eliot was revered in colleges in the Forties, Fifties, and early Sixties and is almost ignored today. She revisits Eliot in "Helping T. S. Eliot Write Better," an entertaining literary spoof in which, among other things, confusion between T.S. Eliot and George Eliot reigns. In other essays, Ozick focuses on Christian heroism and the Holocaust or reflects on the state of American culture, while a couple of the essays are short fictional pieces. The wide variations in themes and length tend to make this collection uneven and jumbled. Separating the pieces into at least two distinct categories would have lessened frustration for readers. Nevertheless, the essays are well worth reading. Both of these collections should be in public and academic libraries.Jeris Cassel, Rutgers Univ. Libs., New Brunswick, N.J.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253210531
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
05/22/1996
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.29(w) x 9.21(h) x 1.04(d)

Meet the Author

ELAINE M. KAUVAR is Professor of English at Baruch College (CUNY). She is the author of Cynthia Ozick's Fiction: Tradition and Invention.

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