Cyrano de Bergerac: A Heroic Comedy in Five Acts / Edition 1

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Overview

Rostand's masterpiece-and the ultimate triumph of the great French romantic tradition-is the magnificent hero-for-all-seasons, Cyrano de Bergerac.

Author Biography:

Burgess presents a glittering modern translation of Rostand's masterpiece--now a motion picture starring Gerard Depardieu, winner of the Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9782253005674
  • Publisher: Livre de Poche
  • Publication date: 10/1/1972
  • Language: French
  • Edition description: French Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 287
  • Product dimensions: 4.50 (w) x 6.96 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Meet the Author

Nicholas Cronk is a Fellow and Tutor in French at St Edmund Hall, Oxford. Christopher Fry is a verse playwright. He is the author of many well-known plays including The Lady's not for Burning.

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Read an Excerpt

THE FIRST ACT



A Performance at the Hotel de Bourgogne



The Hall of the Hotel de Bourgogne in 1640. A sort of Tennis Court, arranged and decorated for Theatrical productions.

The Hall is a long rectangle; we see it diagonally, in such a way that one side of it forms the back scene, which begins at the First Entrance on the Right and runs up to the Last Entrance on the Left, where it makes a right angle with the Stage which is seen obliquely.

This Stage is provided on either hand with benches placed along the wings. The curtain is formed by two lengths of Tapestry which can be drawn apart. Above a Harlequin cloak, the Royal Arms. Broad steps lead from the Stage down to the floor of the Hall. On either side of these steps, a place for the Musicians. A row of candles serving as footlights. Two tiers of Galleries along the side of the Hall; the upper one divided into boxes.

There are no seats upon the Floor, which is the actual stage of our theatre; but toward the back of the Hall, on the right, a few benches are arranged; and underneath a stairway on the extreme right, which leads up to the galleries, and of which only the lower portion is visible, there is a sort of Sideboard, decorated with little tapers, vases of flowers, bottles and glasses, plates of cake, et cetera.

Farther along, toward the centre of our stage is the Entrance to the Hall; a great double door which opens only slightly to admit the Audience. On one of the panels of this door, as also in other places about the Hall, and in particular just over the Sideboard, are Playbills in red, upon which we may read the title La Clorise.

As the Curtain Rises, the Hall isdimly lighted and still empty. The Chandeliers are lowered to the floor, in the middle of the Hall, ready for lighting.



(Sound of voices outside the door. Then a Cavalier enters abruptly.)



THE PORTER

(Follows him)

Halloa there!--Fifteen sols!

THE CAVALIER

I enter free.

THE PORTER

Why?

THE CAVALIER

Soldier of the Household of the King!

THE PORTER

(Turns to another Cavalier who has just entered)

You?

SECOND CAVALIER

I pay nothing.

THE PORTER

Why not?

SECOND CAVALIER

Musketeer!

FIRST CAVALIER

(To the Second)

The play begins at two. Plenty of time--

And here's the whole floor empty. Shall we try

Our exercise?

(They fence with the foils which they have brought)

A LACKEY

(Enters)

--Pst! . . . Flanquin! . . .

ANOTHER

(Already on stage)

What, Champagne?

FIRST LACKEY

(Showing games which he takes out of his doublet)

Cards. Dice. Come on.

(Sits on the floor)

SECOND LACKEY

(Same action)

Come on, old cock!

FIRST LACKEY

(Takes from his pocket a bit of candle, lights it, sets it on the floor)

I have stolen

A little of my master's fire.

A GUARDSMAN

(To a flower girl who comes forward)

How sweet

Of you, to come before they light the hall!

(Puts his arm around her)

FIRST CAVALIER

(Receives a thrust of the foil)

A hit!

SECOND LACKEY

A club!

THE GUARDSMAN

(Pursuing the girl)

A kiss!

THE FLOWER GIRL

(Pushing away from him)

They'll see us!--

THE GUARDSMAN

(Draws her into a dark corner)

No danger!

A MAN

(Sits on the floor, together with several others who have brought packages of food)

When we come early, we have time to eat.

A CITIZEN

(Escorting his son, a boy of sixteen)

Sit here, my son.

FIRST LACKEY

Mark the Ace!

ANOTHER MAN

(Draws a bottle from under his cloak and sits down with the others)

Here's the spot

For a jolly old sot to suck his Burgundy--

(Drinks)

Here--in the house of the Burgundians!

THE CITIZEN

(To his son)

Would you not think you were in some den of vice?

(Points with his cane at the drunkard)

Drunkards--

(In stepping back, one of the cavaliers trips him up)

Bullies!--

(He falls between the lackeys)

Gamblers!--

THE GUARDSMAN

(Behind him as he rises, still struggling with the Flower Girl)

One kiss--

THE CITIZEN

Good God!--

(Draws his son quickly away)

Here!--And to think, my son, that in this hall

They play Rotrou!

THE BOY

Yes father--and Corneille!

THE PAGES

(Dance in, holding hands and singing:)

Tra-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-lere . . .

THE PORTER

You pages there--no nonsense!

FIRST PAGE

(With wounded dignity)

Oh, monsieur!

Really! How could you?

(To the Second, the moment the Porter turns his back)

Pst!--a bit of string?

SECOND PAGE

(Shows fishline with hook)

Yes--and a hook.

FIRST PAGE

Up in the gallery,

And fish for wigs!

A CUT-PURSE

(Gathers around him several evil-looking young fellows)

Now then, you picaroons,

Perk up, and hear me mutter. Here's your bout--

Bustle around some cull, and bite his bung . . .

SECOND PAGE

(Calls to other pages already in the gallery)

Hey! Brought your pea-shooters?

THIRD PAGE

(From above)

And our peas, too!

(Blows, and showers them with peas)

THE BOY

What is the play this afternoon?

THE CITIZEN

"Clorise."

THE BOY

Who wrote that?

THE CITIZEN

Balthasar Baro. What a play! . . .

(He takes the Boy's arm and leads him upstage)

THE CUT-PURSE

(To his pupils)

Lace now, on those long sleeves, you cut it off--

(Gesture with thumb and finger, as if using scissors)

A SPECTATOR

(To another, pointing upward toward the gallery)

Ah, Le Cid!--Yes, the first night, I sat there--

THE CUT-PURSE

Watches--

(Gesture as of picking a pocket)

THE CITIZEN

(Coming down with his son)

Great actors we shall see to-day--

THE CUT-PURSE

Handkerchiefs--

(Gesture of holding the pocket with left hand, and drawing out handkerchief with right)

THE CITIZEN

Montfleury--

A VOICE

(In the gallery)

Lights! Light the lights!

THE CITIZEN

Bellerose, l'eapy, Beaupre, Jodelet--

A PAGE

(On the floor)

Here comes the orange girl.

THE ORANGE GIRL

Oranges, milk,

Raspberry syrup, lemonade--

(Noise at the door)

A FALSETTO VOICE

(Outside)

Make way,

Brutes!

FIRST LACKEY

What, the Marquis--on the floor?

(The Marquis enter in a little group.)

SECOND LACKEY

Not long--

Only a few moments; they'll go and sit

On the stage presently.

FIRST MARQUIS

(Seeing the hall half empty)

How now! We enter

Like trades people--no crowding, no disturbance!--

No treading on the toes of citizens?

Oh fie! Oh fie!

(He encounters two gentlemen who have already arrived)

Cuigy! Brissaille!

(Great embracings)

CUIGY

The faithful!

(Looks around him.)

We are here before the candles.

FIRST MARQUIS

Ah, be still!

You put me in a temper.

SECOND MARQUIS

Console yourself,

Marquis--The lamplighter!

THE CROWD

(Applauding the appearance of the lamplighter)

Ah! . . .

(A group gathers around the chandelier while he lights it. A few people have already taken their place in the gallery. Ligniere enters the hall, arm in arm with Christian de Neuvillette. Ligniere is a slightly disheveled figure, dissipated and yet distinguished looking. Christian, elegantly but rather unfashionably dressed, appears preoccupied and keeps looking up at the boxes.)

CUIGY

Ligniere!--

BRISSAILLE

(Laughing)

Still sober--at this hour?

LIGNIERE

(To Christian)

May I present you?

(Christian assents.)

Baron Christian de Neuvillette.

(They salute.)

THE CROWD

(Applauding as the lighted chandelier is hoisted into place)

Ah!--

CUIGY

(Aside to Brissaille, looking at Christian)

Rather

A fine head, is it not? The profile . . .

FIRST MARQUIS

(Who has overheard)

Peuh!

LIGNIERE

(Presenting them to Christian)

Messieurs de Cuigy . . . de Brissaille . . .

CHRISTIAN

(Bows)

Enchanted!

FIRST MARQUIS

(To the second)

He is not ill-looking; possibly a shade

Behind the fashion.

LIGNIERE

(To Cuigy)

Monsieur is recently

From the Touraine.

CHRISTIAN

Yes, I have been in Paris

Two or three weeks only. I join the Guards

To-morrow.

FIRST MARQUIS

(Watching the people who come into the boxes)

Look--Madame la Presidente

Aubry!

THE ORANGE GIRL

Oranges, milk--

THE VIOLINS

(Tuning up)

La . . . la . . .

CUIGY

(To Christian, calling his attention to the increasing crowd)

We have

An audience to-day!

CHRISTIAN

A brilliant one.

FIRST MARQUIS

Oh yes, all our own people--the gay world!

(They name the ladies who enter the boxes elaborately dressed. Bows and smiles are exchanged.)

SECOND MARQUIS

Madame de Guemene . . .

CUIGY

De Bois-Dauphin . . .

FIRST MARQUIS

Whom we adore--

BRISSAILLE

Madame de Chavigny . . .

SECOND MARQUIS

Who plays with all our hearts--

LIGNIERE

Why, there's Corneille

Returned from Rouen!

THE BOY

(To his father)

Are the Academy

All here?

THE CITIZEN

I see some of them . . . there's Boudu--

Boissat--Cureau--Porcheres--Colomby--

Bourzeys--Bourdon--Arbaut--

Ah, those great names,

Never to be forgotten!

FIRST MARQUIS

Look--at last!

Our Intellectuals! Barthenoide,

Urimedonte, Felixerie . . .

SECOND MARQUIS

(Languishing)

Sweet heaven!

How exquisite their surnames are! Marquis,

You know them all?

FIRST MARQUIS

I know them all, Marquis!

LIGNIERE

(Draws Christian aside)

My dear boy, I came here to serve you--Well,

But where's the lady? I'll be going.

CHRISTIAN

Not yet--

A little longer! She is always here.

Please! I must find some way of meeting her.

I am dying of love! And you--you know

Everyone, the whole court and the whole town,

And put them all into your songs--at least

You can tell me her name!

THE FIRST VIOLIN

(Raps on his desk with his bow)

Pst--Gentlemen!

(Raises his bow)

THE ORANGE GIRL

Macaroons, lemonade--

CHRISTIAN

Then she may be

One of those ?sthetes . . . Intellectuals,

You call them--How can I talk to a woman

In that style? I have no wit. This fine manner

Of speaking and of writing nowadays--

Not for me! I am a soldier--and afraid.

That's her box, on the right--the empty one.

LIGNIERE

(Starts for the door)

I am going.

CHRISTIAN

(Restrains him)

No--wait!

LIGNIERE

Not I. There's a tavern

Not far away--and I am dying of thirst.

THE ORANGE GIRL

(Passes with her tray)

Orange juice?

LIGNIERE

No!

THE ORANGE GIRL

Milk?

LIGNIERE

Pouah!

THE ORANGE GIRL

Muscatel?

LIGNIERE

Here! Stop!

(To Christian)

I'll stay a little.

(To the Girl)

Let me see

Your Muscatel.

(He sits down by the sideboard. The Girl pours out wine for him.)

VOICES

(In the crowd about the door, upon the entrance of a spruce little man, rather fat, with a beaming smile)

Ragueneau!

LIGNIERE

(To Christian)

Ragueneau,

Poet and pastry-cook--a character!

RAGUENEAU

(Dressed like a confectioner in his Sunday clothes, advances quickly to Ligniere)

Sir, have you seen Monsieur de Cyrano?

LIGNIERE

(Presents him to Christian)

Permit me . . . Ragueneau, confectioner,

The chief support of modern poetry.

RAGUENEAU

(Bridling)

Oh--too much honor!

LIGNIERE

Patron of the Arts--

M?cenas! Yes, you are--

RAGUENEAU

Undoubtedly,

The poets gather round my hearth.

LIGNIERE

On credit--

Himself a poet--

RAGUENEAU

So they say--

LIGNIERE

Maintains

The Muses.

RAGUENEAU

It is true that for an ode--

LIGNIERE

You give a tart--

RAGUENEAU

A tartlet--

LIGNIERE

Modesty!

And for a triolet you give--

RAGUENEAU

Plain bread.

LIGNIERE

(Severely)

Bread and milk! And you love the theatre?

RAGUENEAU

I adore it!

LIGNIERE

Well, pastry pays for all.

Your place to-day now--Come, between ourselves,

What did it cost you?

RAGUENEAU

Four pies; fourteen cakes.

(Looking about)

But--Cyrano not here? Astonishing!

LIGNIERE

Why so?

RAGUENEAU

Why--Montfleury plays!

LIGNIERE

Yes, I hear

That hippopotamus assumes the role

Of Phedon. What is that to Cyrano?

RAGUENEAU

Have you not heard? Monsieur de Bergerac

So hates Montfleury, he has forbidden him

For three weeks to appear upon the stage.

LIGNIERE

(Who is, by this time, at his fourth glass)

Well?

RAGUENEAU

Montfleury plays!--

CUIGY

(Strolls over to them)

Yes--what then?

RAGUENEAU

Ah! That

Is what I came to see.

FIRST MARQUIS

This Cyrano--

Who is he?

CUIGY

Oh, he is the lad with the long sword.

SECOND MARQUIS

Noble?

CUIGY

Sufficiently; he is in the Guards.

(Points to a gentleman who comes and goes about the hall as though seeking for someone)

His friend Le Bret can tell you more.

(Calls to him)

Le Bret!

(Le Bret comes down to them)

Looking for Bergerac?

LE BRET

Yes. And for trouble.

CUIGY

Is he not an extraordinary man?

LE BRET

The best friend and the bravest soul alive!

RAGUENEAU

Poet--

CUIGY

Swordsman--

LE BRET

Musician--

BRISSAILLE

Philosopher--

LIGNIERE

Such a remarkable appearance, too!

RAGUENEAU

Truly, I should not look to find his portrait

By the grave hand of Philippe de Champagne.

He might have been a model for Callot--

One of those wild swashbucklers in a masque--

Hat with three plumes, and doublet with six points--

His cloak behind him over his long sword

Cocked, like the tail of strutting Chanticleer--

Prouder than all the swaggering Tamburlaines

Hatched out of Gascony. And to complete

This Punchinello figure--such a nose!--

My lords, there is no such nose as that nose--

You cannot look upon it without crying: "Oh, no,

Impossible! Exaggerated!" Then

You smile, and say: "Of course--I might have known;

Presently he will take it off." But that

Monsieur de Bergerac will never do.

LIGNIERE

(Grimly)

He keeps it--and God help the man who smiles!

RAGUENEAU

His sword is one half of the shears of Fate!

FIRST MARQUIS

(Shrugs)

He will not come.

RAGUENEAU

Will he not? Sir, I'll lay you

A pullet ^ la Ragueneau!

FIRST MARQUIS

(Laughing)

Done!

(Murmurs of admiration; Roxane has just appeared in her box. She sits at the front of the box, and her Duenna takes a seat toward the rear. Christian, busy paying the Orange Girl, does not see her at first.)

SECOND MARQUIS

(With little excited cries)

Ah!

Oh! Oh! Sweet sirs, look yonder! Is she not

Frightfully ravishing?

FIRST MARQUIS

Bloom of the peach--

Blush of the strawberry--

SECOND MARQUIS

So fresh--so cool,

That our hearts, grown all warm with loving her,

May catch their death of cold!

CHRISTIAN

(Looks up, sees Roxane, and seizes Ligniere by the arm.)

There! Quick--up there--

In the box! Look!--

LIGNIERE

(Coolly)

Herself?

CHRISTIAN

Quickly--Her name?

LIGNIERE

(Sipping his wine, and speaking between sips)

Madeleine Robin, called Roxane . . . refined . . .

Intellectual . . .

CHRISTIAN

Ah!--

LIGNIERE

Unmarried . . .

CHRISTIAN

Oh!--

LIGNIERE

No title . . . rich enough . . . an orphan . . . cousin

To Cyrano . . . of whom we spoke just now . . .

(At this point, a very distinguished looking gentleman, the Cordon Bleu around his neck, enters the box, and stands a moment talking with Roxane.)

CHRISTIAN

(Starts)

And the man? . . .

LIGNIERE

(Beginning to feel his wine a little; cocks his eye at them.)

Oho! That man? . . . Comte de Guiche . . .

In love with her . . . married himself, however,

To the niece of the Cardinal--Richelieu . . .

Wishes Roxane, therefore, to marry one
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 52 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Poorly copied

    The guy that copied this did a bad job: random symbols and uppercase letters were common on every page, with the phrase "Digitized by Google" interrupting the text in random places every few pages. It was extremely distracting and not worth trying to ignore while reading. Good thing it was free.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2011

    Hard to read

    I'm not sure if I don't know french well enough, or if the copying was just plain bad. I can hardly understand what was going on, and the "digitized by google" kept popping up and confusing me. Good thing this was free.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2009

    Cyrano de Bergerac: A Heroic Comedy in Five Acts

    I found this book to be particuarly wonderful. It was wholesome, funny, and had a interesting, captivating plot. It had a certain quality that, once you began to read, anything else that was the slightest distraction became a huge hiderance. This book made me think, which is something that I, personally, look for in a book. Everything from the language to the historical French referances to the detailed format and all over details in the story made me invision the time and see the wonderful French culture that the characters expierenced. I would highly reccomend this book to anyone who enjoys the classics, wants to get into a good book, and likes a little challenge in the language. I read this for Honors English 9 and it was fairly easy, aside from maybe the 4 or 5 times i had to pop out the Merriem-Webster ;) I hope someone will take my advice and read this amazing piece of historical literature. Happy reading!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2008

    Awesome book!

    I really enjoyed this book. I couldn't stop reading, could never find the right place to stop. Cyrano de Bergerac had an unusual but unique and 'page-turning' balance of tragedy, comedy, and romance. I admit, the story caught me off guard a few times and I was having a hard time following, but over-all I really enjoyed it and I definitely recommend it to anyone interested, and even those of you who aren't!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2006

    Cyrano de Bergerac

    Cyrano de Bergerac, in my opinion is one of the greatest romances of all time. It speaks of sacrifice and adoration in beautifully melodic language, all three of which (sacrifice, adoration, complex language) seem to be things dead in our modern society. Having been raised on classical literature, I found the book to be somewhat easy to comprehend and would highly recommend it to anyone with a true romantic's soul. Cyrano demonstrates the epitome of heroism in this story, being both well versed and an singular swordsman! The one thing he lacks is beauty and his self-consciousness is what prevents him from rising to the top of his sex. Despite his physical ugliness, Cyrano, in loving Roxane more than wanting to satiate his own desires, demonstrates a love that every woman longs for. I recommend this book for romantics, swashbucklers, poets, adventurers, and lovers and everyone else who doubts that there is such a thing as 'true love'.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2012

    THIS IS IN FRENCH

    Just so naive "free finders" know

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2011

    Good Choice for High School Sophomores.

    I read this book in my tenth grade english class, and I have to say that it was a great way to display all of the types of love, from the pettiest to the most real. The only disappointment I have with this book is that the end was really pointless to me. It didn't make sense that things should have happened the way they did. (I dont want to give away the end for anyone that has yet to read it) I am not saying that everything should be a perfect fairy tale, just some other ending would have sufficed more so than the actual finale. Overall, this book is suitable for the mentioned age group, and it is a good way to teach a lesson in what love really is at a high school age.

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  • Posted May 17, 2011

    Fail

    Not good quality not good spacing and text wad blurred.

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  • Posted October 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Prodigiously Diverting

    Cyrano De Bergerac combines wit, intelligence, beautiful poetry, sweet romance, swashbuckling adventure, and delicious tragedy, played out by delightfully colourful characters.

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  • Posted March 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    "I carry my adornments on my soul"

    The first time I read this was years and years ago, and while I enjoyed it, I was really too young to absorb much more than the basic storyline. My second encounter with Cyrano, however, came over IHOP pancakes as a good friend of mine read the entire play aloud, complete with voices and director's asides about stage setting and the actors. An unforgettable experience, certainly, but as amazing as it was, it was still truly Cyrano's story that gripped me. And it was Brian Hooker's translation---gorgeous, lush, evocative---that brought the play to stirring, poignant life. Cyrano de Bergerac is a beautiful piece, and I have no doubt threads of its story and its words will stay with me for a long time to come.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2009

    Awesome Play

    This play is entertaining and comical

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2008

    Good play overall

    I didn't really like this play as much as I thought I would. In the begining it was a little confusing due to the fact that it had too many characters. I couldn't keep track with all them. After I went and read it in a quite place and concentrated I started understanding. It was smart by the author to add some comedy in the play. It was really funny how they were calling someone fat, but didn't actually say fat. They called him 'monster belly', 'king of obese'. Overall it was a good book but because it was too romantic, I recommend seeing the play rather than reading it. There is a movie about this play called 'Roxanne' with Steve Martin that was very good.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2007

    Amazing!!!

    Cyrano de Bergerac is such a wonderful piece of literature. Yes, it is melodramatic. Yes, it does contain some rather stereotypical characters, and yes, there are some rather uninspired plot choices. But it is wonderfully written, and Rostand is incredibly skilled when it comes to the poetry I was swept away and I was immediately intrigued. It is a really good choice for those who cannot stomach the overbearing fiction that is so often associated with 'classic' works, and it is an excellent choice to read for fun. Who wouldn't enjoy his soliloquy to the ways a person could insult his large nose?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2006

    ' I never loved but one man in my life, and I have lost him- twice.'

    Cyrano De Bergerac is a French play written by Edmond Rostand. It is a classic, romantic, tragedy, set in 17th century France during a time of war with Spain. It tells a story of unrequited love between a man named Cyrano, who has a genius for poetry, and an extremely large nose, and the lovely and beautiful, Roxane(sic) . Cyrano loves his cousin, the beautiful Roxane, but Roxane thinks she is in love with another, the young and handsome cadet, Christian. In reality, Roxane is in love with the eloquence of words. Christian, who can't express his feelings for Roxane, asks Cyrano to help him win her. Roxane is wooed by the words she reads in Christian `s letters, and falls romantically in love with Christian, but the words she has grown to love and adore are the words, wit, and poetry, of Cyrano. Cryano wins the lovely Roxane for Christian, and on the eve of war the two are wed, but before the marriage can be consummated, Christian is ordered to the front. Roxane makes Cyrano promise that he will keep Christian safe. Roxane also extracts a promise from Cyrano to make sure that Christian will write to her everyday. Cyrano, writes the promised letters daily. Facing death, he crosses enemy lines day after day and risks his life so that Roxane receives the promised letters from Christian. Christian does not know the letters are being sent. After some weeks of war, Roxane comes to the battlefield to see her Christian. The soldiers believe that they will die that very night in a desperate battle, so Cyrano has written a final letter for Christian to send to his Roxane. Christian reads the letter and sees the tear stains and now realizes that Cyrano himself, has been in love with Roxane all along. Christian goes to Roxane to find out for sure whether or not she loves him for himself. She tells him that even if he were ugly she would still love him. Christian takes this knowledge back to Cyrano, and upon hearing this, Cyrano is given hope. Christian orders Cyrano to tell Roxane that he has been the one writing to her. In the end Christian dies at the start of the battle and Cyrano does not tell his secret but allows Roxane to believe that the final, sweet, farewell, was written from the loving Christian. Fifteen years go by and Roxane still sits in a convent mourning her lost love. Finally, having been foully run over by his enemies, Cyrano comes to say good by as he knows he is dying. Roxane discovers that it has been her old friend, Cyrano, whom she has really loved all these years. As Cyrano is dying, Roxane laments, 'I have loved but one man in my life , and I have lost him twice.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2005

    A wonderfull play, deserving the title of classic

    I had nothing to read one day so I picked this up. I was hooked from that moment on. I love the characters, the poetry, the tale itself. I could barely put our battered copy down 'til the very end. Brian hooker did an amazing job in translating Dumas' wonderful work.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2004

    ly&danny garcia' wilson rocks1967

    The play is absolutely steller. The heart and soul of a man is to be seen,listened to,and under the flesh the illumination of his worth is magical,quixotic, loyol and forthright and honerable. It blows me away when I read young critics say it's boring.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2004

    A fantastic play!

    Without a doubt this play is the most romantic I have read. The play is classic and can transcend the time barrier, allowing readers of all ages to relate to it. The dominant theme in this play is courtly love and can be seen vividly in every scene, especially, the balcony scene.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2003

    ok- not my type of book

    i had to read this book in order to get into an honors english class. reading plays isn't my type of book. i thought the book was long and boring, and took forever. overall the storyline was okay, but i wouldn't recommend it, and never read it again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2003

    Classic Story With Hidden Meanings

    This novel has a basic story line that has been followed in many other books. Guy likes girl, guy can't get girl, guy enlists help to get girl, and guy gets girl evenutally in the end. Beyond that though, the story is very compelling. The main lesson I recieved from it was to have self confidence. Cyrano had no confidence in his looks because of his nose. He always put himself down because of it and expected others to do the same. No one truly picked on him about his nose, except for when he made it a point. But in the end he learned that his nose did not matter and that the beautiful Roxane loved him just the same for his soul. In today's society everyone could use this lesson. That you need to have confidence in yourself for who you are, because that is what makes you, not your nose.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2003

    Cyrano de Bergerac= An Epitome of Mediocrity

    Cyrano de Bergerac was, in my opinion, a mediocre book at best. The plot was tired and predictable, the characters boring. The only interesting characters are quickly dismissed, and the reasons for doing so border on foolishness. The characters, who were supposed to be the embodiments of true love and devotion turned out to be something quite different, the embodiments of shallowness and obsession. The most upsetting problem with the characters is that they are not developed. Rostand presents the reader with a general idea of who a character is, then quickly moves on. Actions are few and far between, and no sense of action is really conveyed. Perhaps taking Cyrano from the stage to print caused this, but that doesn't change the fact that it is dull. Rostand fails to convey any suspense at all, even when it is apparent that he is trying to. However, as a comedy, Cyrano de Bergerac excels. The humor is diverse; ranging from subtle to out-right insults. Cyrano often speaks insults that are incredibly funny, even by today's standards. That brings the book from a failure to a prime example of mediocrity, although there is still not enough humor to merit reading this book. All in all, the book is simply trying too hard to be something it is not.

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