D-Day: The Allies Strike Back During World War II

D-Day: The Allies Strike Back During World War II

by Terry Miller
     
 

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German dictator Adolf Hitler had conquered most of Europe. Millions of people were dying. It was up to the United States, Britain, and the other Allies to re-take the continent.

The invasion began on June 6, 1944-D-Day. Many soldiers were gunned down as soon as they landed. But as brave young men took on the enemy, the tide of battle turned.

Overview

German dictator Adolf Hitler had conquered most of Europe. Millions of people were dying. It was up to the United States, Britain, and the other Allies to re-take the continent.

The invasion began on June 6, 1944-D-Day. Many soldiers were gunned down as soon as they landed. But as brave young men took on the enemy, the tide of battle turned.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—The authors have done a remarkable job of discussing and describing these two enormous confrontations in a limited number of pages, emphasizing that these were not isolated battles. The books provide solid introductions, followed by three chapters, one of which is based on the personal experiences of a named soldier, and the other two covering broader historical details and strategies of the battle. Bold fonts introduce the major subtopics in each chapter. Illustrations (some effectively tinted) with helpful captions are featured on every page, and sometimes encompass spreads. Excellent maps and plenty of paintings and vintage photos enhance the texts. It is noteworthy that when a photo is not genuine, that fact is stated in the caption. For example, there are no photos of the midnight jumps of paratroopers over Normandy on D-Day; instead, a daylight photo taken over the Netherlands is used to illustrate the topic. Unfortunately, D-Day states, in the text and again in the time line, that V-E Day was May 7, 1945, whereas it was May 8 of that year. Both titles conclude with respectable further-reading lists and excellent bibliographies.—Eldon Younce, Harper Elementary School, KS
VOYA - Florence Munat
This new series is written as a high-interest/low-reading-level set. Other titles are Gettysburg, Pearl Harbor, and Vietnam (Hamburger Hill). The volumes are nearly identical in format. Each measures 6 x 9 inches, runs 64 pages, and contains three short chapters and similar additional materials, such as maps and timelines. As is appropriate for high-low books, they feature photographs and other graphic images on each page. The text is further broken up by headings and subheadings. The publisher states that the reading level for the series is grades five through seven, and the interest level is grades six through twelve. The story of D-Day is prefaced by a brief history of Hitler's rise to power and the American entry into the war. The first chapter focuses on Eisenhower's plans for the invasion; the second features soldiers who parachuted into Normandy, often quoting them; the third describes the seaborne invasion, with quotations from a squad which overcame German machine gunners and helped take the beach. A two-page conclusion relates the liberation of Europe and the end of the war. Students reading below grade level will find much of interest in these books, as well as basic information for report writing. Because the books are so uniformly formatted, the additional materials (such as a two-page index and two-page glossary) sometimes seem insufficient. Changing fonts and page color, combined with the ubiquitous photos, bring these pages close to appearing overly busy, which could discourage readers. Nevertheless, the format usually works, and the subject matter is important and well written. Reviewer: Florence Munat
Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
Students of World War II often debate the turning point of the war. Some experts point toward the German defeat at Stalingrad as the beginning of the end for the Nazi Reich. Other scholars note that the Battle of Midway, which resulted in the devastation of the Japanese aircraft carrier fleet, was an engagement that changed the outcome of the war. For many writers, the Allied landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944 remains the pivotal moment in the entire war. In this chapter of the illustrated "24/7 Goes to War" series, younger readers are given a wonderful opportunity to understand what it might have been like to participate in the D-Day invasion. Through the words and descriptions of actual veterans at the landing, author Terry Miller presents an overview of the invasion with human interest. Readers will encounter the words of Allied soldiers who saw their comrades gunned down before they could even get out of their landing craft. Other veterans describe what it was like to face the seemingly insurmountable odds against survival on Omaha Beach. Through these accounts of the experiences on the Normandy beaches, readers come as close as they can to realizing the human costs involved in historical events. In this way, this book represents the type of historical writing that will draw readers into the world of the past rather than repel them through an arid approach to a potentially vibrant story. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531254523
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
24/7 Goes to War Series: On the Battlefield
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 8.94(h) x 0.15(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

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