Dad, Are You The Tooth Fairy? by Jason Alexander, Ron Spears, Ron Spears |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Dad, Are You The Tooth Fairy?
  • Alternative view 1 of Dad, Are You The Tooth Fairy?
  • Alternative view 2 of Dad, Are You The Tooth Fairy?

Dad, Are You The Tooth Fairy?

by Jason Alexander, Ron Spears, Ron Spears
     
 

Is there really a tooth fairy? World-famous actor Jason Alexander (Seinfeld, Pretty Woman, Shallow Hal) weaves a fresh, funny, and magical tale about this age-old question.

When Gaby overhears some older kids on the playground saying that the tooth fairy is just make-believe, he goes straight to his father to find out the truth. The enchanting tale his dad tells

Overview

Is there really a tooth fairy? World-famous actor Jason Alexander (Seinfeld, Pretty Woman, Shallow Hal) weaves a fresh, funny, and magical tale about this age-old question.

When Gaby overhears some older kids on the playground saying that the tooth fairy is just make-believe, he goes straight to his father to find out the truth. The enchanting tale his dad tells him of a time long ago when mysterious and magical creatures lived on the earth will delight and entertain children and adults alike.

For any child who has ever wondered about the existence of the tooth fairy, this original and reassuring story will satisfy their curiosity and give them the power to believe magical things can happen!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Actor Alexander puts aside his sitcom schtick and Broadway dancing shoes to impart some parental wisdom in his first book for children. Unfortunately, the result is a treacly mess. Like most kids, young Gaby believes in magic. He's thrilled that the tooth fairy leaves coins and notes for him when he places a baby tooth in a special envelope under his pillow. But as he gets older and hears talk from more worldly kids about fairies being nonsense, he decides to get to the bottom of things. The titular query to his father results in a confusing story-within-a-story about the legend of magic fairies and how they communicate with modern-day parents and kids. Though Alexander's heart may be in the right place, few kids will likely have the patience for this convoluted tale and may well be disappointed in the ethereal answer given by Gaby's dad. Spears, also making his picture book debut, delivers a combination of realistic and exaggerated family portraits where Dad sometimes resembles Jerry Seinfeld, fittingly enough. The artist also creates a rainbow-hued fairy realm teeming with mystical creatures. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Gaby had always received notes from the tooth fairy as well as money. He was surprised to hear from his friends that there was no tooth fairy, that it was really moms and dads. When Gaby confronted his father, he told Gaby, "The only honest answer I can give." As people turned away from magic, the creatures of magic, such as dragons, unicorns and fairies began to fade. While it is parents who take the teeth, the notes they write come from a voice inside their heads. Children must trust that it is the voice of the fairies or they, too, will vanish just as the unicorns did. Based on the actual conversation the actor had with his son, this is a heartfelt way to respond to that inevitable question without destroying the magic and the belief in something intangible. Primary grade children, the audience for this book, will find humor and sophistication in the illustrations which have a resemblance to today's animated cartoons. 2005, Orchard Books, Ages 6 to 9.
—Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Gaby likes losing his baby teeth because it means a visit from Gwyneth, his own personal tooth fairy. However, older children have planted the seeds of doubt regarding the existence of not only the tooth fairy, but also of superheroes, fairy-tale characters, and the Easter Bunny. Gaby questions his father, saying, "I need the absolutely total honest truth.-" Dad promises "the only honest answer I can give" and then proceeds to spin a convoluted tale about a time when dinosaurs and dodo birds walked the Earth alongside wizards, unicorns, and fairies. As people began to take control of the world, the magic began to fade. The last remaining fairy promised to speak through parents and leave treasures for children as long as they believe. This poorly written story is tediously long and wordy, replete with sentence fragments as well as sentence after sentence beginning with "and" or "but." The garishly colored cartoons resemble nightmarish hallucinations, as opposed to a fantasy realm that any youngster would care to visit. For a classic title on the topic, stay with Lucy Bate's Little Rabbit's Loose Tooth (Random, 1988).-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439667456
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/11/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >