Daddy Love [NOOK Book]

Overview


Dinah Whitcomb seemingly has everything. A loving and successful husband, and a smart, precocious young son named Robbie. One day, their worlds are shattered when Dinah is attacked and Robbie is taken in a mall parking lot. Dinah, injured, attempts to follow, but is run over by the kidnapper's van, mangling her body nearly beyond repair.

The kidnapper, a part-time Preacher named Chester Cash, calls himself Daddy Love, as he has abducted, tortured, and raped several young boys. ...

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Daddy Love

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Overview


Dinah Whitcomb seemingly has everything. A loving and successful husband, and a smart, precocious young son named Robbie. One day, their worlds are shattered when Dinah is attacked and Robbie is taken in a mall parking lot. Dinah, injured, attempts to follow, but is run over by the kidnapper's van, mangling her body nearly beyond repair.

The kidnapper, a part-time Preacher named Chester Cash, calls himself Daddy Love, as he has abducted, tortured, and raped several young boys. He renames Robbie "Gideon." Daddy Love slowly brainwashes "Gideon" into believing that he is Daddy Love's real son, and any time the boy resists or rebels it is met with punishment beyond his wildest nightmares.

As Robbie grows older, he becomes aware of just how monstrous Daddy Love is. Though as a small boy he as terrified of what might happen if he disobeyed Daddy Daddy Love, Robbie begins to realize that the longer he stays in the home of this demon, the greater chance he'll end up like Daddy Love's other "sons" who were never heard from again. Somewhere within this tortured young boy lies a spark of rebellion, and he will soon discover just what lengths he'll go to to survive.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
After all these years, Joyce Carol Oates can still give me the creeps…Oates is a mind-reader who writes psychological horror stories about seriously disturbed minds, and it's hard to tear your eyes away from her grimly detailed portrait of Daddy Love. But her insights into nice, ordinary people—the kind of people Robbie's parents used to be, before their son was stolen—are no less incisive.
Publishers Weekly
At the start of this gripping psychological thriller from Oates (The Gravedigger’s Daughter), Dinah Whitcomb is playing the “find our car” game with her five-year-old son, Robbie, in the parking lot of an Ypsilanti, Mich., mall when a stranger seizes the boy and runs over Dinah in his van, maiming her. Robbie is renamed Gideon by Daddy Love, his abductor, who has kidnapped several little boys through the years, killing them when they’re adolescents and “too old” for him. The outside world knows Daddy Love as Chet Cash, a loving father, a sensitive artist, and itinerant preacher. Spanning six years, the action shifts between Gideon and Daddy Love, who’s quick to mete out cruel punishments, and Dinah and her husband, bonded by guilt in a crumbling marriage. The creep factor ramps up when the intuitive Gideon realizes that he’s not Daddy Love’s only “son” and the fate that awaits him. This unsettling tale showcases Oates’s masterful storytelling. Agent: Warren Frazier, John Hawkins & Associates. (Jan.)
New York Times
“Oates’s disturbing tale is chillingly conveyed in this audio edition thanks to Christine Williams’s compelling narration.”
Publishers Weekly
From the Publisher
“Oates makes us squirm as she forces us to see some of the action through Love’s twisted and warped perspective.”
Kirkus

“Oates is a mind-reader who writes psychological horror stories about seriously disturbed minds, and it’s hard to tear your eyes away from her grimly detailed portrait of Daddy Love. But her insights into nice, ordinary people—the kind of people Robbie’s parents used to be, before their son was stolen—are no less incisive.”
New York Times

Kirkus Reviews
Oates raises a troubling question here--whether moral fiction can emerge out of a morally reprehensible character. Chester Cash, aka Daddy Love, is an itinerant preacher with a penchant for abducting and torturing young boys, and the novel begins with one such abduction. Five-year-old Robbie Whitcomb is doted on by his mother, Dinah, but one day, in the parking lot of a shopping mall, she neglects her son just long enough to have him spirited away by Daddy Love. In trying to prevent this horrifying act from occurring, Dinah is run over by Love's van and never physically recovers. Love makes off with Robbie and eventually moves him from Michigan to New Jersey, where they live in virtual seclusion. Love gives out that he's a widower who doesn't want to talk about his late wife--a statement which is, by the way, true--and a suspicion lingers in our minds that he might well have murdered his wife, a well-to-do woman about 40 years older than Love. Through confinement and humiliation, Robbie is trained to see the preacher as his "real" father, although Love, like his ironic name, is obviously a grotesque perversion of paternal solicitude. He deprives Robbie of food, confines him in a "truth box" and sexually abuses him. After six years, Robbie is able to escape and reunite with his parents. Dinah is jubilant about this reunion, though Whit, Dinah's husband, is somewhat less so, in part because his status as the father of a missing child made him a quasi-celebrity. But Robbie, of course, is not the same child at 11 that he was at 5, and their family reconnection is, to put it charitably, uneasy. This is an uncomfortable novel to read; Oates makes us squirm as she forces us to see some of the action through Love's twisted and warped perspective.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802193650
  • Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 201,470
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author


Joyce Carol Oates is the author of such national best-sellers as The Falls, Blonde, and We Were the Mulvaneys. She has been nominated for six National Book Awards, winning for Them.

Biography

Joyce Carol Oates is one of the most influential and important storytellers in the literary world. She has often used her supreme narrative skills to examine the dark side of middle-class Americana, and her oeuvre includes some of the finest examples of modern essays, plays, criticism, and fiction from a vast array of genres. She is still publishing with a speed and consistency of quality nearly unheard of in contemporary literature.

A born storyteller, Oates has been spinning yarns since she was a little girl too young to even write. Instead, she would communicate her stories through drawings and paintings. When she received her very first typewriter at the age of 14, her creative floodgates opened with a torrent. She says she wrote "novel after novel" throughout high school and college -- a prolificacy that has continued unabated throughout a professional career that began in 1963 with her first short story collection, By the North Gate.

Oates's breakthrough occurred in 1969 with the publication of them, a National Book Award winner that established her as a force to be reckoned with. Since that auspicious beginning, she has been nominated for nearly every major literary honor -- from the PEN/Faulkner Award to the Pulitzer Prize -- and her fiction turns up with regularity on The New York Times annual list of Notable Books.

On average Oates publishes at least one novel, essay anthology, or story collection a year (during the 1970s, she produced at the astonishing rate of two or three books a year!). And although her fiction often exposes the darker side of America's brightest facades – familial unrest, sexual violence, the death of innocence – she has also made successful forays into Gothic novels, suspense, fantasy, and children's literature. As novelist John Barth once remarked, "Joyce Carol Oates writes all over the aesthetical map."

Where she finds the time for it no one knows, but Oates manages to combine her ambitious, prolific writing career with teaching: first at the University of Windsor in Canada, then (from 1978 on), at Princeton University in New Jersey. For all her success and fame, her daily routine of teaching and writing has changed very little, and her commitment to literature as a transcendent human activity remains steadfast.

Good To Know

When not writing, Oates likes to take in a fight. "Boxing is a celebration of the lost religion of masculinity all the more trenchant for its being lost," she says in highbrow fashion of the lowbrow sport.

Oates's Black Water, which is a thinly veiled account of Ted Kennedy's car crash in Chappaquiddick, was produced as an opera in the 1990s.

In 2001, Oprah Winfrey selected Oates's novel We Were the Mulvaneys for her Book Club.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Rosamond Smith
    2. Hometown:
      Princeton, New Jersey
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 16, 1938
    2. Place of Birth:
      Lockport, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Syracuse University, 1960; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1961

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 6, 2013

    JCO always intrigues and startles. This is a despicable story,

    JCO always intrigues and startles. This is a despicable story, but occurs more often than we wish to believe. The back ground story of /the parents is sad and disturbing. This book is not for everyone to be sure, but I love Oates' style. What an ending!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    COLE

    By

    1 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2013

    Don't waste your money

    What a dumb book. It was neither titillating, suspensful, gory or scary. It was a story about a child abduction. None of the characters were believable or even that likeable and the storyline was slooooow. Don't waste your money

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 21, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This Audio CD was provided to me by HighBridge Audio courtesy of

    This Audio CD was provided to me by HighBridge Audio courtesy of Audio Jukebox in return for an honest, unbiased review.

    This was my first Joyce Carol Oates book and definitely won't be my last. I found the writing to be concise and well-developed with what
    seemed to be great detail to each of the characters. I enjoyed that the main characters were more taboo than your regular main character!

    The story seemed like an actual story straight out of the headlines which is exactly what caught and kept my attention! I also really liked
    how the ending worked out!

    The narrator did a wonderful job of reading this story! She was able to really capture my attention and maintain it throughout the entire story. 

    Overall, I really enjoyed listening to this book and will not hesitate to seek out more Joyce Carol Oates books in the near future!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2013

    This was not a very good book. The information listed on the ba


    This was not a very good book. The information listed on the back said it was "thrilling and suspenseful."
    I found it to be redundant and less than enjoyable. I had the audiobook and and found the narrator to be 
    dull but some of it may be that the material wasn't that great. I'd like to give this author another chance 
    and read other books. We'll see. I would not recommend this book to others....sorry!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Gripping

    I could not put this book down. I was a bit confused by the ending but JCO is sometimes not one wrap everything up in a neat bow.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 5, 2013

    Good read!

    I never read this author before but I really enjoyed this. I like good drama stories and this was one. I will be reading her new book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2013

    I am a big JCO fan but this was not my favorite book by her, thu

    I am a big JCO fan but this was not my favorite book by her, thus the 4/5 stars. I found it to be more deeply disturbing than some of her other novels and although I am really not worthy to critique her writing I did not feel that this book was as well written as a typical JCO novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    What kind of endin was that?

    Disturbing......open ending......not worth $2 let alone the $13 i paid!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Joyce Carol Oates does it again. This book is tense, continually

    Joyce Carol Oates does it again. This book is tense, continually engaging with a surprise ending. No matter what you think the end will be while reading - that will not be the ending. Her books are always well developed, with great characterization, intelligent and a surprise as each book is completely different from her other books. She has no "formula" despite her prolific writing. Read this one - expect to be disturbed...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    A Disturbing Read

    Daddy Love. What ever compelled JCO to write a novel like this? I found it sickening. I did not finish this book. Don't waste your time or money on this one. Ms. Oates, really could you not have done any better? A sick mind writes of sick and perverse themes. F

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    E

    A very sick &disturbing read. Could not finish.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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