Daddy Mountain

Daddy Mountain

2.5 2
by Jules Feiffer
     
 

Before your very eyes, this little redhead is about to do something extremely daring. And scary. And she'll show you-she'll actually document, step-by-step-exactly how she does it. First, she takes her Daddy and makes him stand very still. Then, balancing herself on his shoe, she wraps her arms tightly around a leg and starts her perilous ascent to the summit.

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Overview

Before your very eyes, this little redhead is about to do something extremely daring. And scary. And she'll show you-she'll actually document, step-by-step-exactly how she does it. First, she takes her Daddy and makes him stand very still. Then, balancing herself on his shoe, she wraps her arms tightly around a leg and starts her perilous ascent to the summit. Thrills and chills, guaranteed. LOOK OUT BELOW!! JULES FEIFFER has won a number of prizes for his cartoons, plays, and screenplays, including the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. His books for children include The House Across the Street; By the Side of the Road; I'm Not Bobby; I Lost My Bear; and Meanwhile..He lives in New York City.

Editorial Reviews

Should you dare to accept this mission-trekking up the legs, torso, and shoulders of one remarkably patient Daddy Mountain -- you will surely laugh. Join Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Feiffer as he charts a plucky redhead's playful climb up her father's body. Narrating her ascent with hilarious melodrama, the little girl triumphs over her fear, eventually perching atop her dad's head. (Ages 2 to 4)
Child magazine's Best Children's Book Awards 2004
Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Parents who enjoy interactive play should select this book, in which a child scales a stoical "Daddy Mountain." Each page focuses on the red-haired knee-high girl who tells the story. The father, drawn in a nubbly, granite-like charcoal that contrasts with the watercolor-and-ink sketches of his small daughter, is too tall to fit on a page; readers see only his legs and torso as the child makes her steep ascent. The girl fortifies herself before beginning ("Fruit juice gives me energy"), then hauls herself up a pants-leg ("It's harder than you think"). The father's knees obligingly bend to give the mountaineer a rest until she can grip his belt, but otherwise he offers no assistance. Giving instructions to the audience as she goes, the girl reaches his button-down shirt: "If you grab hold of his skin, he'll get mad." Using a shoulder and ear, she drags herself to the summit and calls her mother to "Come quick!" At the terrific conclusion, a vertical gatefold opens up to picture the gray Daddy Mountain transformed into a grinning full-color person (with a girl on his head). After several darker-themed but equally satisfying books like The House Across the Street and I'm Not Bobby!, Feiffer breaks for some lighthearted, affectionate fare. He writes and draws from the girl's point of view, emphasizing the relative sizes of child and parent. He makes a plaything of the adult, who silently endures all manner of humiliation during this game. Youngsters will want to try this sport at home. Ages 2-up. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Even before the title page the little red haired girl peeks up from the bottom of the page. She is getting ready to climb the "Daddy Mountain." After a drink of fruit juice to give her energy, she bravely approaches the mountain's feet. Carefully she begins to climb and, as she goes higher and higher, gives instructions for climbing a Daddy Mountain. "Remember, the Daddy Mountain must wear a shirt. Because if you grab hold of his skin, he'll get mad." It is an amazing feat to reach the top. When the red haired girl climbs on top of the head of the Daddy Mountain, she calls to her mother to share in her success. Mother's reaction is perfect. Feiffer captures the exuberance and imagination of a young child in a highly entertaining story. From the little girl's perspective daddy is strong, steady and rock-solid. Underlying all is the strong bond between father and daughter. This is well executed, right down to the arm shadows where she is slipping. There is a page fold that opens up to reveal the little girl on top of her father's head. Because this can tear easily, it will be a problem for public libraries. However, it is a great title for a Father's Day story hour and a wonderful addition to the story hour collection or home library. 2004, Michael Di Capua Books/ Hyperion, Ages 4 to 7.
—Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Beginning at his toes, a little girl laboriously climbs up her father until she is perched triumphantly on top of his head. Along the way, she provides practical advice on making this a successful procedure: "Remember, the Daddy Mountain must wear a shirt. Because if you grab hold of his skin, he'll get mad." Although Feiffer keeps a reasonable amount of suspense going during this combination ordeal/adventure, there is little substance to inspire rereading and little appeal for youngsters who have outgrown attempting this feat. What story there is descends into stereotypes: when the child reaches her goal (as shown on a two-page vertical foldout), her father nonchalantly declares, "No problem, she's fine," and seems proud of his daughter's accomplishment, while her mother's reaction is to faint. The illustrations are vintage Feiffer; for most of the book, Daddy's body is drawn-mountain still-in charcoal, while the girl is depicted with much more fluid black lines and bright colors. While the pictures capture the full range of her emotions, they do not elevate the title to anything other than an additional purchase.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another crowd-pleaser from Feiffer, this one featuring a surprisingly (for him) non-neurotic child who takes on a tricky challenge: climbing her standing father. Freely changing relative sizes to make the task seem all the more forbidding, Feiffer depicts her in bright oranges, greens, and flesh tones against monochrome paternal segments. Radiating determination, she negotiates ankles, knees, belt, shirt, and shoulder in succession until, in a climactic scene that folds up and bursts out in full color, she perches exuberantly atop the head of her heroically proportioned papa. Mama may cover her eyes in horror on the final page, but children will share the young mountaineer's triumph-and is that a layer of metaphor lurking beneath? Surely not. (Picture book. 5-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786809127
Publisher:
Hyperion Books for Children
Publication date:
06/01/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.56(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
380L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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Daddy Mountain 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Feiffer's illustrations dominate The Daddy Mountain in which charcoal sketches of Daddy are juxtaposed with a watercolor image of a little girl with bright red hair, who attempts to ascend the daunting height of her father's body. The climb begins at his loafered feet after the child announces,'it's very high.' Slowly she makes her way up a very patient Dad's leg and torso precariously clinging bravely, until triumphantly reaching the summit. There is a fold over, vertical page in full color displaying a daughter perched upon Dad's head. Both father and child have matching ear to ear grins. The fold over page may not last long in libraries so plan on using plenty of mending tape because this book will circulate in both elementary school libraries and public libraries. It is a great choice for storytime. The illustrations alone are worth the price.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jules Feiffer is fun - for adults. And as he's done in almost all of his books for children, Feiffer has dished out yet another children-patronizing tale that is directed at parents and children's books collectors. Unfortunately, as I've experienced with most of his books this far, my first and second graders found this book 'boring', and 'and then what happens' at the end of the book. Perhaps Feiffer's marketing team should change their target audience to those trying to recapture their childhood instead of talking down to our kids who are actually experiencing childhood.