Daffodil, Crocodile
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Daffodil, Crocodile

by Tomek Bogacki, Emily Jenkins
     
 

Triplet Daffodil does not want to be as sweet as a flower, and she is sick and tired of constantly being mistaken for her sisters. With a papier-mâché crocodile head and a "Raaa raaa raaa chomp chomp chomp," Daffodil embarks on a day of getting dirty, biting trees, and playing with her food. One thing is for sure - everyone knows the crocodile is

Overview

Triplet Daffodil does not want to be as sweet as a flower, and she is sick and tired of constantly being mistaken for her sisters. With a papier-mâché crocodile head and a "Raaa raaa raaa chomp chomp chomp," Daffodil embarks on a day of getting dirty, biting trees, and playing with her food. One thing is for sure - everyone knows the crocodile is DAFFODIL, not Rose or Violet. But what is Daffodil to do when her crocodile head falls apart? Will she go back to being a pretty, clean little flower of a girl?

Bright illustrations enliven this charming story of a spunky heroine asserting herself as an individual.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A wisely perceptive celebration of a child's need to define herself." —Kirkus Reviews

"Lots of curves and movement capture Daffodil's spirited play and fierce assertion of self." —The Horn Book

"Colorful art, whimsical and expressive, fills pages with fanciful patterns, perspectives, and details, interweaving fantasies amid familiar activities and settings."—Booklist

"Plenty of kids will relish the notion of releasing their inner scary monster, and they'll find it enjoyable to let loose with a few comradely "Raa raa raas" of their own."—The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Will reassure girls that breaking the mold and getting their knees dirty is sometimes a very good idea." -The New York Times Book Review

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Daffodil, Violet, and Rose are triplets, "like a bouquet of flowers," say their mother's friends. But Daffodil is tired of being mixed up with her sisters all the time. So when her mother makes a papier-mache crocodile head, Daffodil puts it on. Inside, she can happily take imaginary adventures as herself, commit mischief, and certainly not be mistaken for a flower. But when she comes out of her bath, the crocodile head falls apart. Still, Daffodil insists that she is still a crocodile, ready "to swim across the ocean and play with other creatures of the sea." And her sisters seem to want to join her. The visual tale of the need for one's own identity is told primarily in vignettes, in a simple, almost childlike style, one that includes only the most significant details. The dinner table scene, with only bits of background furniture, includes the sisters sucking up strands of spaghetti while the "crocodile" stuffs masses of the pasta into her mouth. Her words are printed in a larger, bolder type, adding to the power of her make-believe.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
Another story about one of three look-alike sisters. Daffodil is tired of being compared to a flower or mistaken for one of her siblings. When her mother makes a papier-mâché crocodile head, the youngster dons it and reinvents herself as a loud, dirty crocodile. For one blissful day, she terrorizes Violet and Rose (she eats the guests at their tea party); wreaks havoc at the dinner table; and firmly stakes her claim as a single girl, rather than one of a threesome. But the mask is damaged in the bathtub and must come off. Undeterred, Daffodil assures her mother that she is still a crocodile and proceeds to act like one, with her siblings joining in the noisy fun. Bogacki's illustrations are bold and bright. The mask is comically over-the-top-almost as large as Daffodil herself. However, while this book provides a testament to individuality, Daffodil (Farrar, 2004) has already done the job, and done it better. Rather than picking up where that book leaves off, this one simply tells the same story again. The image of the crocodile implies a stomping of the status quo (and there is plenty of stomping in this story) but there is none of the boisterous subversiveness of the first book.
—Kara Schaff DeanCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Having led her fellow triplet sisters in a sartorial rebellion in her debut outing (Daffodil, 2004), the intrepid Daffodil returns in an even more vigorous expression of her individuality. Daffodil is sick of being mistaken for her sisters, and she's even more fed up with being typed as, "A pretty little, clean little flower of a girl." When her mother makes a papier-mache crocodile head for her art class, Daffodil expropriates it and assumes a dual identity. With exuberant "Raaa raaa raaa" and "Chomp chomp chomp," the crocodile wreaks happy mayhem at school, eating its classmates and getting very dirty on the playground. Jenkins gets the desire of the young child to remake herself just right, giving her heroine free rein to explore her new persona. Bogacki's childlike crayons plumb his characters' emotional lives with equal accuracy, the simple, moonlike faces enormously expressive, the oversized crocodile head fiercely toothy; Daffodil-as-Crocodile appropriately dominates each spread, either larger than her merely human counterparts or appearing multiple times-or both. A wisely perceptive celebration of a child's need to define herself. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374399443
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
04/17/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.14(w) x 11.17(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

EMILY JENKINS and TOMEK BOGACKI previously collaborated on the Bea and HaHa books, Daffodil, and Five Creatures, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book, a Charlotte Zolotow Award Honor Book, and an ALA Notable Book. Ms. Jenkins lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Mr. Bogacki lives in Long Island City, New York.

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