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Daffodil
     

Daffodil

by Jenkins, Tomek Bogacki (Illustrator)
 

It's time for a change — of clothes!

Daffodil had two sisters,

and they all three looked alike.

People couldn't tell them apart.

When Daffodil and her sisters go to parties, Mommy puts them in fancy dresses of different colors so that people will know "who is who, and which is which." Violet's dress is violet, with lots of

Overview

It's time for a change — of clothes!

Daffodil had two sisters,

and they all three looked alike.

People couldn't tell them apart.

When Daffodil and her sisters go to parties, Mommy puts them in fancy dresses of different colors so that people will know "who is who, and which is which." Violet's dress is violet, with lots of lace. Rose's dress is pink, with little bows all over. Lucky ducks. Poor Daffodil's dress is a horrible yellow, with weird fake pearls. She hates it "very extremely hugely much." One day Daffodil finally has enough - and when she rebels, she learns something surprising from her sisters.

This funny story about individuality is given a lively twist by Tomek Bogacki's colorful illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A spirited tale about individuality...Bogacki's colored chalk art flounces across the spreads with text that twirls with the girls and large type that emphasizes Daffodil's reactions. Entertaining and blooming with child appeal." — Kirkus Reviews

"Jenkins tells a sly story, and most children will recognize the irritating adults who squelch individuality...Bogacki cheerfully extends the children's sense of claustrophobia...as well as the joyful relief as the girls spin and dance, dressed as who they want to be." — Booklist

"Bogacki's simple, playful pictures are wonderfully expressive, conveying the distinct personality of each child and conveying Daffodil's dilemma in child-friendly, waxy oil color crayons that practically glow." — School Library Journal

"Jenkins and Bogacki team up again for another look at the ways we categorize...The same friendly curces define both the typeset and Bogacki's lively pictures, a design well matched to a story about bending the lines." — The Horn Book

"Jenkins' writing maintains the same child-focused clarity it evinced in Five Creatures, and the text moves easily from measured exposition to chantable repeated phrases...provocative." — Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Sara London
Jenkins's funny tale endorses individuality while wagging a gentle finger at well-intentioned parents. In our attempts to assert our children's separate identities, might we be making premature assumptions?
The New York Times
Children's Literature
There once were three little sisters, Violet, Rose, and Daffodil who looked so much alike that no one could tell them apart. Their mother dressed them in fancy frocks the colors of their names. At parties, everyone could easily identify Violet and Rose, but Daffodil would endure the grown-ups in their "fake-cheerful voices" as they asked whether she was Sunflower or Marigold or Mustard or Dandelion and even the Yellow Rose of Texas. One day Daffodil had enough and refuse to wear yellow "not now, not ever again." To Mommy's surprise, Violet and Rose declared their dislike of purple and pink. From that day of their independence the three little sisters wore what they chose and no one could " tell who was who or which was which except for Mommy (most of the time)." The bright full-page illustrations in mixed media feature sharp angular characters whose lines are softened by feathery brush strokes. Refusing to conform and declaring one's individuality is not a new concept, but the fresh treatment here and the warm appeal of these little girls gives it new vitality and charm. 2004, Farrar, Ages 5 to 9.
—Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Daffodil is having a bad day. On special occasions, her well-meaning mother has taken to dressing her and her two sisters in gowns to match their names: Rose wears a many-layered frock of the prettiest pink; Violet's is, naturally, violet, a confection of lace; but Daffodil's own dress reminds her of- pee. Daffodil hates her yellow dress "very extremely hugely much," and she's sick and tired of the lame flower jokes she is forced to endure when she wears it. Finally, it all becomes too much, and she must protest: "I hate it, I hate it, I hate it!" In fact, each girl detests her own color-coded dress and wishes she could wear another. This comes as something of a surprise to their unsuspecting mother, who is more than willing to let the girls make their own choices and express their individual tastes, now that she knows how strongly they feel. Bogacki's simple, playful pictures are wonderfully expressive, conveying the distinct personality of each child and communicating Daffodil's dilemma in child-friendly, waxy oil crayon colors that practically glow. Pair this with Margaret Chodos-Irvine's Ella Sara Gets Dressed (Harcourt, 2003) for a program about clothing and choices, or perhaps with Tom Lichtenheld's What Are You So Grumpy About? (Little, Brown, 2003) to launch a chat about frustration.-Kathy Krasniewicz, Perrot Library, Old Greenwich, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The creative team of Five Creatures (2001) has produced a spirited tale about individuality. People can't tell Daffodil and her sisters apart, even though Daffodil has a big mouth, Violet has squinty eyes, and Rose has a dimple in her chin. For parties, to tell the difference, their mother dresses them in different colors that match their names. Violet and Rose are "LUCKY DUCKS" because their dresses are pretty, but Daffodil hates her yellow dress because it reminds her of pee! Daffodil refuses to wear her dress the next time, because she hates it "very extremely Hugely MUCH," only to discover that her sisters hate theirs, too. When they outgrow the dresses, Mommy lets them choose new party clothes: Violet picks black with a pleated skirt, Rose picks plaid with a velvet sash, and Daffodil chooses cherry red pants with a matching jacket. Bogacki's colored chalk art flounces across the spreads with text that twirls with the girls and large type that emphasizes Daffodil's reactions. Entertaining and blooming with child appeal. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374316761
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
05/03/2004
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.12(w) x 11.26(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Emily Jenkins and Tomek Bogacki previously collaborated on Five Creatures, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book, a Charlotte Zolotow Award Honor Book, and an ALA Notable Children's Book. Both author and artist live in New York City.

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