Dallas: The Music Story

Dallas: The Music Story

     
 

You may have heard plenty of strange records in your lifetime, but you've never heard anything quite as odd as Dallas: The Music Story, a quasi-soundtrack/concept album orchestrated by legendary music biz hustler Artie Ripp. The idea of Dallas: The Music Story is to have songs written -- and sometimes sung -- from theSee more details below

Overview

You may have heard plenty of strange records in your lifetime, but you've never heard anything quite as odd as Dallas: The Music Story, a quasi-soundtrack/concept album orchestrated by legendary music biz hustler Artie Ripp. The idea of Dallas: The Music Story is to have songs written -- and sometimes sung -- from the perspective of the show's characters, to dig just a little bit deeper into the psyches of the people who populated the greatest prime-time soap of the '80s. Given its Texas setting, it is no surprise that country is the chosen musical style for Dallas: The Music Story but nothing here sounds like it would be welcome in a honky tonk or even Gilley's. This is all Urban Cowboy country-pop created with an eye on the charts, so it's slathered in synthesizers and set to a precise click track, evoking not the country-pop of the early '80s but rather the warm, shimmering surfaces of soft rock. Frankly, that's the magical thing about the album: it's a transmission from a lost world, evoking every forgotten scrap of bad taste from the Reagan years. Each song is catchy in a purely professional way, lodging in the subconscious through pure persistence, the production anonymous yet keenly commercial, a product of an era where a cheap cash-ins like this still needed to be performed by actual musicians in an expensive recording studio. So, as pure sonics, Dallas: The Music Story is a deliriously appealing pop culture artifact, but just as you're enjoying the sound it sinks in that all of these songs are about Dallas. Sometimes, this fact hits you in the face, such as when Steve Kanaly chants "Who Killed Jack Ewing?" or when Howard Keel bellows "J.R.! Who Do You Think You Are" -- both choruses set to a bit of belligerent country-disco -- but the gentler numbers are just as odd. Johnny Lee -- who, along with Crystal Gayle is the only country star here -- has to sing the unwieldy "The Loneliness in Lucy's Eyes (The Life Sue Ellen Is Living)," but that's slightly less preposterous than the contrived melancholy of "If I Knew Then What I Know No (J.R.'s Lament)," where Gary Morris is given the impossible task of finding the heart within J.R. Ewing. On every level, it is ridiculous, but that's why Dallas: The Music Story is worthwhile: not only do they no longer make records like this, they rarely ever did make records like this. And the strangest thing of all? This was released in 1986, not 1981.

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Product Details

Release Date:
10/16/2012
Label:
Rockbeat Records
UPC:
0089353309121
catalogNumber:
3091
Rank:
114728

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. The Theme From Dallas (Dallas Dreams)  -  Black Gold
  2. Who Killed Jack Ewing?  - Steve Kanaly
  3. I Wanna Reach Out and Touch You (Jack and Miss Ellie's Song)  - Karen Brooks
  4. Makin' Up For Lost Time (The Dallas Lovers' Song)  - Gary Morris
  5. A Few Good Men (Pam and Jenna's Song For Bobby)  - Forrester Sisters
  6. J.R.! Who Do You Think You Are?  - Howard Keel
  7. Working Man's Son (the Ewing/Barnes Legacy)  - Bob Cook
  8. The Loneliness in Lucy's Eyes (The Life Sue Ellen Is Living)  - Johnny Lee
  9. I'm a Survivor  - Jamie Ewing
  10. If I Knew Then What I Know Now (J.R.'S Lament)  - Gary Morris

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jerry Wallace   Electric Guitar
Steve Gibson   Electric Guitar
Wendy Waldman   Background Vocals
Judy Rodman   Background Vocals
Joe Chemay   Bass
Eddie Bayers   Drums
Barry Beckett   Synthesizer,Keyboards
Ken Bell   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Dennis Burnside   Synthesizer,Keyboards,Electric Piano
Mark Casstevens   Acoustic Guitar
Doug Clements   Background Vocals
Bruce Dees   Background Vocals
Sonny Garrish   Dobro
Owen Hale   Drums
John Hobbs   Piano
Jim Horn   Saxophone
Mitch Humphries   Piano,Electric Piano
Mike Lawler   Synthesizer
Paul Leim   Drums
Bruce Miller   Conductor
Steve Nathan   Keyboards
Michael Rhodes   Bass
Brent Rowan   Electric Guitar
Lisa Silver   Background Vocals
Wendy Suits   Background Vocals
Fred Tackett   Guitar
Diane Tidwell   Background Vocals
Dennis Wilson   Background Vocals
Paul Worley   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Curtis Young   Background Vocals
Billy Joe Walker   Guitar
Dean Huff   Guitar
Steve Croson   Background Vocals
Pal Finest   Background Vocals
Lonnie Ledford   Bass

Technical Credits

Bob Jenkins   String Arrangements
Barry Beckett   Producer
Sean Boyd   Engineer
Dennis Burnside   String Arrangements
David Franco   Executive Producer
Joel Goldsmith   Sound Effects
Peter Granet   Engineer
Scott Hendricks   Engineer
Steve Melton   Engineer
Bruce Miller   Arranger
Jim Ed Norman   Producer
Artie Ripp   Director,Producer,Executive Producer,Concept
Rick Ruggieri   Engineer
Dan Wallin   Engineer
Cliff Zellman   Sound Effects,Engineer
Bobby Roberts   Executive Producer
J.L. Wallace   Producer
James Fitzgerald   Producer
Terry Skinner   Producer
Alan Schulman   Engineer
David Jacobs   Creation
Rob Budges   Engineer

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