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Damage Mechanics of Cementitious Materials and Structures / Edition 1
     

Damage Mechanics of Cementitious Materials and Structures / Edition 1

by Gilles Pijaudier-Cabot
 

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ISBN-10: 1848213409

ISBN-13: 9781848213401

Pub. Date: 02/01/2012

Publisher: Wiley

The book, prepared in honor of the retirement of Professor J. Mazars, provides a wide overview of continuum damage modeling applied to cementitious materials.
It starts from micro-nanoscale analyses, then follows on to continuum approaches and computational issues. The final part of the book presents industry-based case studies.
The contents emphasize

Overview

The book, prepared in honor of the retirement of Professor J. Mazars, provides a wide overview of continuum damage modeling applied to cementitious materials.
It starts from micro-nanoscale analyses, then follows on to continuum approaches and computational issues. The final part of the book presents industry-based case studies.
The contents emphasize multiscale and coupled approaches toward the serviceability and the safety of concrete structures.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848213401
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Series:
ISTE Series , #606
Pages:
255
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Preface Gilles Pijaudier-Cabot Frédéric Dufour xi

Chapter 1 Bottom-Up: From Atoms to Concrete Structures Franz-Josef Ulm Roland J-M Pellenq 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 A realistic molecular model for calcium-silicate-hydrates 2

1.2.1 Background 3

1.2.2 Molecular properties of C-S-H 5

1.2.3 From molecular properties to C-S-H microtexture 7

1.3 Probing C-S-H microtexture by nanoindentation 9

1.3.1 Does particle shape matter? 9

1.3.2 Implementation for back analysis of packing density distributions 11

1.3.3 Functionalized properties: nanogranular origin of concrete creep 12

1.4 Conclusions 15

1.5 Bibliography 16

Chapter 2 Poromeehanics of Saturated Isotropic Nanoporous Materials Romain Vermorel Gilles Pijaudier-Cabot Christelle Miqueu Bruno Mendiboure 19

2.1 Introduction 20

2.2 Results from molecular simulations 22

2.3 Poromechanical model 24

2.3.1 Nomenclature and definitions 24

2.3.2 Effective pore pressure 26

2.3.3 Thermodynamical equilibrium condition 28

2.3.4 Constitutive equation of the effective pore pressure 31

2.3.5 Effect on the volumetric strain 33

2.3.6 Effect on the permeability 34

2.4 Adsorption-induced swelling and permeability change in nanoporous materials 37

2.4.1 Comparison with data by Day et al 39

2.4.2Comparison with data by Ottiger et al 41

2.4.3 Variation of effective permeability 41

2.5 Discussion - interaction energy and entropy 42

2.6 Conclusions 46

2.7 Acknowledgments 47

2.8 Bibliography 48

Chapter 3 Stress-based Non-local Damage Model Cedric Giry Frederic Dufour 51

3.1 Introduction 52

3.2 Non-local damage models 57

3.2.1 Continuum damage theory 57

3.2.2 Original integral non-local approach 60

3.2.3 Non-local integral method based on stress state 62

3.2.4 Numerical implementation 65

3.3 Initiation of failure 67

3.4 Bar under traction 70

3.4.1 Global behavior 71

3.4.2 Mechanical quantities in the FPZ 72

3.4.3 Crack opening estimation 75

3.5 Description of the cracking evolution in a 3PBT of a concrete notched beam 79

3.5.1 Global behavior 80

3.5.2 Cracking analysis 81

3.6 Conclusions 82

3.7 Acknowledgments 84

3.8 Bibliography 84

Chapter 4 Discretization of Higher Order Gradient Damage Models Using Isogeometric Finite Elements Clemens V. Verhoosel Michael A. Scott Michael J. Borden Thomas J.R. Hughes René De Borst 89

4.1 Introduction 89

4.2 Isotropic damage formulation 91

4.2.1 Constitutive modeling 92

4.2.2 Implicit gradient damage formulation 95

4.3 Isogeometric finite elements 97

4.3.1 Univariate B-splines and NURBS 97

4.3.2 Multivariate B-splines and NURBS 100

4.3.3 Isogeometric finite-element discretization 101

4.4 Numerical simulations 103

4.4.1 One-dimensional rod loaded in tension 103

4.4.2 Three-point bending beam 107

4.5 Conclusions 115

4.6 Acknowledgments 116

4.7 Bibliography 116

Chapter 5 Macro and Mesoscale Models to Predict Concrete Failure and Size Effects David Grégoire Peter Grassl Laura B. Rojas-Solano Gilles Pijaudier-Cabot 121

5.1 Introduction 122

5.2 Experimental procedure 125

5.2.1 Material, specimens and test rig descriptions 125

5.2.2 Experimental results 128

5.2.3 Size effect analysis 131

5.3 Numerical simulations 134

5.3.1 Macroscale modeling 135

5.3.2 Mesoscale modeling approach 140

5.3.3 Analysis of three-point bending tests 143

5.4 Conclusions 152

5.5 Acknowledgments 153

5.6 Bibliography 153

Chapter 6 Statistical Aspects of Quasi-Brittle Size Effect and Lifetime, with Consequences for Safety and Durability of Large Structures Zdenek P. Bazant Jia-Liang Le Qiang Yu 161

6.1 Introduction 161

6.2 Type-I size effect derived from atomistic fracture mechanics 164

6.2.1 Strength distribution of one RVE 164

6.2.2 Size effect on mean structural strength 168

6.3 Size effect on structural lifetime 170

6.4 Consequences of ignoring Type-2 size effect 172

6.5 Conclusion 177

6.6 Acknowledgments 177

6.7 Bibliography 178

Chapter 7 Tertiary Creep: A Coupling Between Creep and Damage - Application to the Case of Radioactive Waste Disposal J.M. Torrenti T. De Larrard F. Benvoundjema 183

7.1 Introduction to tertiary creep 184

7.2 Modeling of tertiary creep using a damage model coupled to creep 185

7.2.1 Creep model 186

7.2.2 Damage model 188

7.2.3 Coupling between damage and creep 188

7.3 Comparison with experimental results 189

7.4 Application to the case of nuclear waste disposal 190

7.4.1 Leaching of concrete 191

7.4.2 Coupled mechanical and chemical damage 192

7.4.3 Chemical damage 193

7.4.4 Example of application: creep coupled to leaching 194

7.4.5 Probabilistic effects 194

7.5 Conclusions 197

7.6 Bibliography 198

Chapter 8 Study of Damages and Risks Related to Complex Industrial Facilities Bruno Gérard Bruno Capra Gaël Thillard Christophe Baillis 203

8.1 Context 203

8.2 Introduction to risk management 204

8.3 Case study: computation process 206

8.3.1 Identifying the owner's issues 208

8.3.2 Simplifying the system 208

8.3.3 Choosing the best models 210

8.3.4 Defining the most realistic load boundaries 210

8.4 Application 212

8.4.1 Deformed structure after impact 213

8.4.2 Damage variables of concrete 214

8.4.3 Analysis of results 217

8.5 Conclusion 219

8.6 Acknowledgment 220

8.7 Bibliography 220

Chapter 9 Measuring Earthquake Damages to a High Strength Concrete Structure Patrick Paultre Benedikt Weber Sébastian Mousseau Jean Proulx 221

9.1 Introduction 221

9.2 Overview of the selected testing methods 222

9.3 Two-storey HPC building 223

9.4 Inducing damage - pseudo-dynamic testing procedures 227

9.4.1 Input ground motion 228

9.4.2 Earthquake responses 230

9.5 Evaluating damage - forced vibration testing procedures 236

9.5.1 Frequency responses 238

9.6 Damage detection - analytical evaluation 239

9.6.1 Modal analysis 240

9.6.2 Finite-element model 240

9.6.3 Model updating 242

9.6.4 Regularization 244

9.6.5 Results 246

9.7 Summary and conclusions 248

9.8 Bibliography 249

List of Authors 251

Index 253

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