Damn Dutch: Pennsylvania Germans at Gettysburg

Overview

This is the first work to highlight the contributions of regiments of the Pennsylvania Dutch and the post-1820 immigrant Germans at the Battle of Gettysburg. On the first day, the 1st Corps, in which many of the Pennsylvania Dutch groups served, and the half-German 11th Corps, which had five regiments of either variety in it, bought with their blood enough time for the Federals to adequately prepare the high ground, which proved critical in the end for the Union victory. On the second day, they participated in ...
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Damn Dutch: Pennsylvania Germans at Gettysburg

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Overview

This is the first work to highlight the contributions of regiments of the Pennsylvania Dutch and the post-1820 immigrant Germans at the Battle of Gettysburg. On the first day, the 1st Corps, in which many of the Pennsylvania Dutch groups served, and the half-German 11th Corps, which had five regiments of either variety in it, bought with their blood enough time for the Federals to adequately prepare the high ground, which proved critical in the end for the Union victory. On the second day, they participated in beating back Confederate attacks that threatened to crack the Union defenses on Cemetery Hill and in other strategic locations.
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Editorial Reviews

Author of Battle Cry of Freedom - James McPherson
"Provides new information on Pennsylvania Germans in the Civil War era."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780811706742
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books
  • Publication date: 6/28/2010
  • Pages: 236
  • Sales rank: 504,132
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

David L. Valuska is Freyberger Professor Emeritus of Pennsylvania German Studies at Kutztown University.

Christian B. Keller is Associate Professor of Military History at the United States Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Belvoir.

Martin Oefele is a former professor of American history at the University of Munich.

Scott Hartwig has been an interpretive park ranger at Gettysburg National Military Park since 1980.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 29, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great History of the German at Gettysburg

    One quarter of the Union Army were German immigrants, and the ones who fought with the Army of the Potomac sufferred terrible casualties through inept leadership, but were accused of cowerdice by those same inept commanders and made scape goats. The authors set the record straight in "Damn Dutch." Germans in the Civil War seem to be a hot topic lately. Keller also has a history of Genrmans at Chancellorsville, about how the Germans sufferred discrimination after that battle and the effect on the German immigrant population. Suhrer's The Flying Dutchmen, about a German regiment from Ohio, covers much the same ground, but it is a novel, not a history book. (A blast to read!) See "I also recommend" below.

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