Dan McGrew

Dan McGrew

5.0 1
by R. Service, Mark Summers
     
 

The ethos of Robert Service's poems is a raw barroom machismo, a celebration of those red-blooded Real Men who, when put to the test, will survive.

Another theme of these Yukon poems is that of the wanderer--a fantasy of the bourgeoisie, albeit one that Service actually lived. rootlessness has, of course, always figured in the American/Canadian cultural lexicon

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Overview

The ethos of Robert Service's poems is a raw barroom machismo, a celebration of those red-blooded Real Men who, when put to the test, will survive.

Another theme of these Yukon poems is that of the wanderer--a fantasy of the bourgeoisie, albeit one that Service actually lived. rootlessness has, of course, always figured in the American/Canadian cultural lexicon since the days of Fenimore Cooper and Daniel Boone. In Service's writing, however, the wanderer acquired an almost holy and enigmatic sense of mission.

Finally, the third and most pervasive theme of these poems is nature itself, the venue in which the Real Men characters perform, and are found worthy or wanting. If ever this bard of the backlands rises to the eloquent grandeur of his themes, it is in these evocations of what he called, variously, the Great Cold, the Long Night, the Great Alone, and the eternally brooding Great White Silence; the Silence, "you most could hear."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760702093
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
05/13/1996

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Dan McGrew 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the favorite books of poetry on my shelf, I own several books of Robert Service poetry. His works are among the most delightful to read out loud. This collection, largely gold-rush tales, weaves the spell of the far north with a brilliance untouched by almost any other author. Most of these works have a simple meter and rhyming scheme. You could almost march to them. Yet the breadth of emotion, the intimacy of detail, the colorful description of a world clothed in whites and grays ¿ all combine to place this work in a class of its own.