Dance Mania

Dance Mania

by Tito Puente & His Orchestra
     
 

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Puente's career is so broad and varied, moving from be-bop oriented large groups and all-percussion rumbas to collaborations with Celia Cruz and small groups, that no one record can capture what he does. But Dance Mania, recorded in 1957 with a big band, shows off his arranging talents along with his deep swing on timbales. It's brilliantly graceful and relaxed

Overview

Puente's career is so broad and varied, moving from be-bop oriented large groups and all-percussion rumbas to collaborations with Celia Cruz and small groups, that no one record can capture what he does. But Dance Mania, recorded in 1957 with a big band, shows off his arranging talents along with his deep swing on timbales. It's brilliantly graceful and relaxed dance music, heavy on mambos, with the singer Santos Colon drifting over the riffs and choruses. Dig a bit further into his catalogue from the 1950s and early 1960s and one hears real harmonic sophistication (listen to "3D Mambo" on Dance Mania for some Latin be-bop), and Puente's collaborations with Celia Cruz from the 1960s are so filled with joy that if marketed correctly, they might put a dent in Prozac sales.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - John Bush
Dance Mania, Tito Puente's best-known and best-selling album, came ten years into his career, but at a time (1957) when the craze for mambo and Latin music was beginning to crest. (Another landmark LP, Pérez Prado's Havana 3 A.M., had been released the previous year, and Prado's "Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White" had hit number one in 1955.) Recorded as part of a just-signed exclusive contract with RCA and appearing in vibrant sound as part of the label's Living Stereo series, Dance Mania exploded with a series of tight arrangements, propulsive playing, and the features of new additions in vocalist Santos Colón and conguero Ray Barretto (who helped, in part, make up for the recent loss of Willie Bobo and Mongo Santamaria to Cal Tjader's group). Puente didn't dilute his sound for Dance Mania -- unlike the many commercial crossover LPs that were released by both established groups and ad hoc studio collectives -- but his hard mambos here were performed at tempos that encouraged dancing by more staid LP-buyers, slightly slower than the high paces of his Tico sides or Palladium shows. Brassy and swinging, yes, and certainly as precise as a great Latin band could get, but not as torrid as Spanish Harlem dancers would be accustomed to. Most were Puente originals, spanning mambo and cha-cha and guaguanco, and Dance Mania built the foundation for great Latin LPs to come.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/22/1991
Label:
Sony U.S. Latin
UPC:
0078635246728
catalogNumber:
13586

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Tito Puente & His Orchestra   Primary Artist
Ray Barretto   Percussion
Tito Puente   Percussion,Leader,Marimbas,Timbales,Vibes,Bandleader
Julio Collazo   Percussion
Santos Colon   Vocals,Choir, Chorus
Jimmy Frisaura   Trumpet
Bernie Glow   Trumpet
Jerry Sanfino   Saxophone
Gene Rapett   Trumpet
Ray Rodriguez   Percussion
Vitín Avíles   Choir, Chorus
Rafael Palau   Saxophone
Otto Olivar   Choir, Chorus
George Lopez   Trumpet
Frank Lo Pinto   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Tito Puente   Arranger
Lew Brown   Composer
Mickey Crofford   Engineer
Buddy DeSylva   Composer
Ray Henderson   Composer
Domingo G. Echevarria   Reissue Coordinator
Harry Sepulveda   Reissue Coordinator
Samuel Lopez   Reissue Coordinator

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