Dance, Nana, Dance / Baila, Nana, Baila: Cuban Folktales in English and Spanish

Dance, Nana, Dance / Baila, Nana, Baila: Cuban Folktales in English and Spanish

by Joe Hayes, Mauricio Trenard Sayago
     
 

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These folk stories teach the deep-hearted wisdom of the Cuban people.  See more details below

Overview

These folk stories teach the deep-hearted wisdom of the Cuban people.

Editorial Reviews

Criticas

Gr 4-8

These 13 bilingual folktales introduce readers to Cuban classics, which are, in turn, heavily influenced by Spanish, African, and Caribbean cultures. The entertaining collection presents readers with a variety of colorful characters, such as an old lady who can dance for days, an old devil who leaves hairy footprints as he walks, a boy who can never remember what his mother wants from the store, and the man who "had never done a day's work in his life." Hayes's language is characteristically expressive and descriptive in both languages. Some of the tales have a musical verse or two that will encourage listeners to join in during storytelling sessions. A bold pastel illustration that beautifully celebrates Afro-Cuban culture accompanies each story. The book includes an introduction, table of contents, and on the back pages, helpful notes to readers and storytellers, as well as background information on the stories. In this last part, the author provides connections to stories told by the Grimm brothers and Native Americans, as well as to African and Latin American folktales. A great acquisition for upper elementary and middle school libraries, and an excellent resource for storytellers.Betsy Duarte Shepard, Wakefield Middle School, Tucson, AZ

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Children's Literature - Rosa Roberts
A trip to Cuba inspired the author to compile and retell these13 Cuban folktales. The English and Spanish tales are inspired by Spanish, African, and Caribbean cultures. The diversity of cultures in the stories, as well as colorful, descriptive, and animated words, brings to life the folk stories. The English text is on the left pages and Spanish text on the right pages, which assists in the readability for bilingual readers. Readers and storytellers will be captivated, entertained, and engaged in the variety of stories centered on the Latin American country. The themes of the stories range from healing, trickery, lucky charms, fate, tricksters, and villains. The author does a splendid job in providing notes to the readers and storytellers at the end of the book. This bilingual compilation would make a wonderful asset in a multicultural library, for storytellers, or for bilingual readers. Reviewer: Rosa Roberts
School Library Journal

Gr 3-6

Hayes has a well-deserved reputation for classy, catchy retellings of Latino stories, predominately those from the desert Southwest of the United States. This collection takes him farther afield but maintains the quality of narrative and the characteristic "tellability" that readers and storytellers have come to expect of him. The title story relates the acquisition of fire from an old witch by two canny jimaguas , the Cuban term for twins. This story is similar in structure to Native American tales in which the thief is Coyote or Raven; here the siblings employ music and dance as their method. Many of the tales share this characteristic: a typical folktale motif combined with uniquely Cuban elements. "You Can't Dance/No baila" tells how the animals of the forest join forces to rid themselves of a pesky family of devils. Tales such as this one which involve tricking an evil character into harming himself, are widespread, as is the element of using an animal's behavior (in this case that of turkeys tucking their heads under their wings) to drive the action. "Buy Me Some Salt" is a Cuban variant of the Appalachian tale "Soap, Soap, Soap." Throughout, the tellings are clear and amusing, equally well adapted for reading or for listening. Sayago's acrylic illustrations are bright and bold, with black-outlined, highlighted shapes that almost resemble stained glass. They ably complement the text, but certainly the narrative stands alone.-Ann Welton, Helen B. Stafford Elementary, Tacoma, WA

From the Publisher
"Hayes’s language is characteristically expressive and descriptive in both languages. A bold pastel illustration that beautifully celebrates Afro-Cuban culture accompanies each story.…A great acquisition for upper elementary and middle school libraries, and an excellent resource for storytellers." —Críticas, starred review

"Lively, often funny and sometimes a bit scary…Eminently tellable, all the stories have refrains and songs sure to get audiences joining in." —Kirkus Reviews

"A lively bilingual collection of 13 folktales from Cuba with the type of vivid color illustrations books from Cinco Puntos Press typically include." —World Wide Work bulletin

"The accessibility of Hayes’ vivid but streamlined language coupled with rock-solid structure of the stories themselves (replete with the repetition and building of tension that tellers and listeners rely on) make this accessible both to young readers and to storytellers and other adult readers-aloud." —Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

"Readers will have fun doing both with these unique and entertaining stories…A full page illustration precedes each of the thirteen folktales and provides readers with a perfect visual reference for the stories that Mr. Hayes has taken care to retell in the Cuban tradition." —Review of Texas Books

"This collection of Cuban folk tales is a delicious mix of stories passed down for generations. Hayes, who first visited Cuba in 2001, fell in love with the island and its people and that love is reflected in his delightful book. These are stories that are even better when read out loud." —Tucson Citizen

"Hayes has captured the essence and diversity of Cuba…Perfect for teaching bilingual students or units on world myths in the classroom. Recommended." —REFORMA newsletter

"This colorful bilingual anthology of thirteen Cuban folktales has sabor, the flavor of the Caribbean, bringing the rich mixture of Spanish, African and American influences to his readers. Cuban folkloric wisdom and wit fill these pages. There is a rhythmic quality to the linguistic expression in both the English and Spanish narratives, reminiscent of the importance of rhythm in the Cuban way of life." —The American Folklore Society: Aesop Prize commendation

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606376785
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
10/28/2010
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Meet the Author


Joe Hayes is one of America's premier storytellers. He grew up in a small town in southern Arizona where he learned Spanish from his classmates. As he got older, Joe began gathering old stories from the Southwest. Joe has earned a distinctive role as a bilingual storyteller. Mauricio Trenard was born in Santiago de Cuba in 1963. He was raised in a home that was closely linked with art, surrounded by clay objects: plaster figures, broken molds, as well as the artistic debates sustained by the various artists and art history professors in his family. Mauricio came to the United States in 2000.

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