Dance on the Wind: The Plainsmen

Dance on the Wind: The Plainsmen

3.6 5
by Terry C. Johnston
     
 

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Sixteen-year-old Titus Bass fears one fate more than any other: never to experience the great wilderness or the wildness inside himself. So late one night he snatches a squirrel gun and a handful of biscuits, flees into the woods, and doesn’t look back. From Louisville past the Chickasaw bluffs and the Natchez Trace all the way to New Orleans, he plunges into…  See more details below

Overview

Sixteen-year-old Titus Bass fears one fate more than any other: never to experience the great wilderness or the wildness inside himself. So late one night he snatches a squirrel gun and a handful of biscuits, flees into the woods, and doesn’t look back. From Louisville past the Chickasaw bluffs and the Natchez Trace all the way to New Orleans, he plunges into the rough-and-tumble life along the banks of the Mississippi: a volatile, violent country of boatmen and river bandits, knife fights and Indian raids, strong liquor and stronger women. Yet beyond the great river stretches the vast, unexplored expanse of the Great Plains. And it is here that young Titus will seek his future, and risk everything to seize it.


From the Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Fourth in Johnston's series of historicals about mountain man Titus Bass (after One-Eyed Dream), this entry goes back to Titus's youth, in the early 1800s. The opening pages, covering the future legend's years as a Kentucky farmboy, move slowly as Titus debates whether to run away from home. The story picks up speed, plot and action when, restless and hungry for adventure at age 16, he finally does, joining the jolly crew of a flatboat carrying cargo from Cincinnati to New Orleans, a dangerous 1000-mile trip down the majestic Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Handy with a long rifle, pistol and knife, Titus survives Indian attacks, barroom brawls and highway robbery, leaving few opponents upright. When not slugging, shooting and stabbing, he expends his remaining teenage energy as a randy-and not too particular-backwoods Lothario. After his successful trip downriver, Titus still dreams of going west to see the far mountains, plains and buffalo. Then, abruptly, Johnston puts the brake on the pace and rhythm of his story by having his hero languish in St. Louis as a blacksmith until he is 30. The novel's final hundred pages are as dull as the first hundred, as Titus makes horseshoes, gets drunk and listens to others tell tales of the mysterious West. Still, the historical and geographic descriptions are vivid, as are the many hearty and colorful characters. Hopefully, the next Titus Bass book will find both the mountain man and his creator busy with the action that each handles so well. (Sept.)
Wes Lukowsky
One of frontier novelist Johnston's most popular characters has been Titus Bass, the protagonist of a trilogy that began with "Carry the Wind" (1982). Here, in the first installment of a new series, we move backward in time to Bass' youth. It's 1810, and young Titus feels the age-old pressure to honor the family vocation--in his case, farming--but the prospect of life behind a mule makes the young man queasy. Finally, faced with an angry father who can't tolerate his son's dreamin' ways, the 17-year-old Titus sets out for the horizon. After joining up with a group of river rats, Titus quickly finds the adventure he seeks but along with it comes the sobering realization that on the frontier your friends can get hurt and even die. Johnston is a deservedly popular western author whose appeal lies not so much in the adventures he dramatizes as in the depth of his characters. They love, grieve, laugh, and feel guilt, anger, and jealousy. They're real people, not just providers of vicarious thrills.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307755841
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/21/2010
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
640
Sales rank:
263,499
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Terry C. Johnston is recognized as a master of the American historical novel. His grand adventures of the American West combine the grace and beauty of a natural storyteller with complete dedication to historical accuracy and authenticity. Johnston was born on the first day of 1947 on the plains of Kansas, and lived all his life in the American West. His first novel, Carry the Wind, won the Medicine Pipe Bearer Award from the Western Writers of America, and his subsequent books have appeared on bestseller lists throughout the country. After writing more than thirty novels, he died in March 2001 in Millings, Montana.


From the Paperback edition.

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Dance on the Wind: The Plainsmen 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Rudy Mesa More than 1 year ago
T Johnston has developed a variety of wonderful characters and rotton characters you love to hate in his series devoted to main characterTitus Bass If your interested in the wilderness and the age of the mountain man, then this is a must
sopranoIN More than 1 year ago
There were times that I thought this book was a little bit of a romance and also a little "bawdy" and romance books aren't my thing.  That somehow didn't keep me from reading all of it.  I was surprised by the content of his book because I knew the age of many of  his readers and that many people would think of his books as westerns or historical fiction.  But you know...I think this is a very good  picture of a young boy growing up and wanting to follow his dreams and finding out how very hard that is to do at times.   And wow, if you really like to learn about history, this is fun.  Every time I read something and thought "can that really be where that  happened", I looked it up and it was true.  Not a quick read but definitely a good one.
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