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Dancing Girls and Other Stories [NOOK Book]

Overview

This splendid volume of short fiction testifies to Margaret Atwood's startlingly original voice, full of a rare intensity and exceptional intelligence. Her men and women still miscommunicate, still remain separate in different rooms, different houses, or even different worlds. With brilliant flashes of fantasy, humor, and unexpected violence, the stories reveal the complexities of human relationships and bring to life characters who touch us deeply, evoking terror and laughter, compassion and recognition--and ...
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Dancing Girls and Other Stories

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Overview

This splendid volume of short fiction testifies to Margaret Atwood's startlingly original voice, full of a rare intensity and exceptional intelligence. Her men and women still miscommunicate, still remain separate in different rooms, different houses, or even different worlds. With brilliant flashes of fantasy, humor, and unexpected violence, the stories reveal the complexities of human relationships and bring to life characters who touch us deeply, evoking terror and laughter, compassion and recognition--and dramatically demonstrate why Margaret Atwood is one of the most important writers in English today.
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Editorial Reviews

Anatole Broyard
Dancing Girls is not a cheerful book, yet there's hope in it. What it shows us is that, no matter how bad things get. . .human personality can always be counted on to come up with yet another symptom, another desperate piece of poetry. There's no end to us, even in our unhappiness.
The New York Times
From the Publisher
“A stunning collection”
The New York Times Book Review

“Margaret Atwood is a deeply serious writer who is also wildly funny.”
Chatelaine

“Deft, sardonic: quintessential Atwood.”
Globe and Mail

“Margaret Atwood’s stories are fierce parables about the horror of city life and the power politics of relationships.…A remarkable collection.”
–Victoria Glendinning, Sunday Times (U.K.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451686845
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 521,407
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Margaret  Atwood

Margaret Atwood was born in Ottawa in 1939, and grew up in northern Quebec and Ontario, and later in Toronto. She has lived in numerous cities in Canada, the U.S., and Europe.

She is the author of more than forty books — novels, short stories, poetry, literary criticism, social history, and books for children. Atwood’s work is acclaimed internationally and has been published around the world. Her novels include The Handmaid’s Tale and Cat’s Eye — both shortlisted for the Booker Prize; The Robber Bride, winner of the Trillium Book Award and a finalist for the Governor General’s Award; Alias Grace, winner of the prestigious Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in Italy, and a finalist for the Governor General’s Award, the Booker Prize, the Orange Prize, and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; The Blind Assassin, winner of the Booker Prize and a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; and Oryx and Crake, a finalist for The Giller Prize, the Governor General’s Award, the Orange Prize, and the Man Booker Prize. Her most recent books of fiction are The Penelopiad, The Tent, and Moral Disorder. She is the recipient of numerous honours, such as The Sunday Times Award for Literary Excellence in the U.K., the National Arts Club Medal of Honor for Literature in the U.S., Le Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France, and she was the first winner of the London Literary Prize. She has received honorary degrees from universities across Canada, and one from Oxford University in England.

Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto with novelist Graeme Gibson.

Biography

When Margaret Atwood announced to her friends that she wanted to be a writer, she was only 16 years old. It was Canada. It was the 1950s. No one knew what to think. Nonetheless, Atwood began her writing career as a poet. Published In 1964 while she was still a student at Harvard, her second poetry anthology, The Circle Game, was awarded the Governor General's Award, one of Canada's most esteemed literary prizes. Since then, Atwood has gone on to publish many more volumes of poetry (as well as literary criticism, essays, and short stories), but it is her novels for which she is best known.

Atwood's first foray into fiction was 1966's The Edible Woman, an arresting story about a woman who stops eating because she feels her life is consuming her. Grabbing the attention of critics, who applauded its startlingly original premise, the novel explored feminist themes Atwood has revisited time and time again during her long, prolific literary career. She is famous for strong, compelling female protagonists -- from the breast cancer survivor in Bodily Harm to the rueful artist in Cat's Eye to the fatefully intertwined sisters in her Booker Prize-winning novel The Blind Asassin.

Perhaps Atwood's most legendary character is Offred, the tragic "breeder" in what is arguably her most famous book, 1985's The Handmaid's Tale. Part fable, part science fiction, and part dystopian nightmare, this novel presented a harrowing vision of women's lives in an oppressive futuristic society. The Washington Post compared it (favorably) to George Orwell's iconic 1984.

As if her status as a multi-award-winning, triple-threat writer (fiction, poetry, and essays) were not enough, Atwood has also produced several children's books, including Princess Prunella and the Purple Peanut (1995) and Rude Ramsay and the Roaring Radishes (2003) -- delicious alliterative delights that introduce a wealth of new vocabulary to young readers.

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    1. Hometown:
      Toronto, Ontario
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 18, 1939
    2. Place of Birth:
      Ottawa, Ontario
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Toronto, 1961; M.A. Radcliffe, 1962; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1967
    2. Website:

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 10, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great short stories by Atwood!

    When I picked it up, I had no idea that Dancing Girls by Margaret Atwood was a book of short stories. I'm usually not a short story fan overall, but was excited to read Atwood's take, since I'm a big fan of her.

    I'm still working on my Margaret Atwood Challenge, reading one of her novels per month, basically in order of publication, so this is my December book.

    While a few of the stories in Dancing Girls had endings that left me stumped, I still enjoyed reading them. But for the most part, they kept me very entertained.

    For instance, The War in the Bathroom was told over the course of a week, where a woman feels like her living space is being invaded daily by an elderly man whose bathroom habits can be clearly heard from her room.

    Then in The Man from Mars, a strange little foreign man begins to stalk Christine. . .

    Rape Fantasies has a dark name, but is a witty story about one woman's ridiculous rape fantasies that somehow turn into love.

    Atwood's Dancing Girls has a common theme of obsession with a hint of crazy that touches almost every story in the collection. And of course, you know I'm loving the obsessive/crazy theme with my psychological thriller kick!

    If you enjoy Margaret Atwood or enjoy reading short stories, these are some great ones to get into!

    Speaking of obsession, what is something you are a little obsessed with?

    Thanks for reading,

    Rebecca @ Love at First Book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    Karttavis

    Kartavis a bad man

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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