The Dangerous Book of Heroes

The Dangerous Book of Heroes

3.8 5
by Conn Iggulden, David Iggulden
     
 

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Conn Iggulden, co-author of the phenomenally successful The Dangerous Book for Boys, and David Iggulden now bring us The Dangerous Book of Heroes—featuring great stories of courage and adventure to thrill and inspire any reader. From George Washington to Sitting Bull to Martin Luther King to the passengers on Flight 93, here are amazing

Overview

Conn Iggulden, co-author of the phenomenally successful The Dangerous Book for Boys, and David Iggulden now bring us The Dangerous Book of Heroes—featuring great stories of courage and adventure to thrill and inspire any reader. From George Washington to Sitting Bull to Martin Luther King to the passengers on Flight 93, here are amazing stories of heroism that parents can share with their children, or enjoy all by themselves.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this off-key collection of biographical sketches, the authors of the bestselling Dangerous Book for Boys series stumble over the limitations of retro puerility as a worldview. A few Americans, like George Washington and Martin Luther King Jr., and heroines, including Florence Nightingale and Helen Keller, appear in their pantheon, but the Igguldens embrace the sensibilities of a daydreaming Edwardian lad by focusing on soldiers and explorers of the British Empire. Some of these—Horatio Nelson, Antarctic martyr Robert Scott—seem wholly admirable, but in others the boisterous lust for adventure is accompanied by brutality and perversity. The authors dutifully note Sir Richard Burton's mind-expanding encounters with Indian prostitutes. They balance Oliver Cromwell's massacres of Irish Catholics with his achievement in decapitating royal absolutism, and offset 17th-century buccaneer Henry Morgan's town burning and church pillaging against his role in building the British Empire. As they struggle to explain their protagonists' misdeeds, the Igguldens' commitment to historical complexity undercuts their celebration of boyish dangerousness. This awkward mix of genuine uplift, moral ambiguity, and imperial nostalgia will confuse as much as it inspires. B&w line drawings. (Apr. 20)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061995408
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/20/2010
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
977,184
File size:
4 MB

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Meet the Author

Despite finding time to write historical novels and The Dangerous Book for Boys, Conn Iggulden is in some ways better known as a trainer of Tollins. His Tollin troupe, Small and Mighty, are famous in Tasmania, where they often play to packed houses. Tragically, he lost his two best-known performers earlier this year. "The thing about transporting Tollins in shoe boxes," he says, "the really important thing, is to remember to put the airholes in."

Lizzy Duncan, with her trademark blue glasses, was a founding member of the Tollins in Art program, where inner-city schoolchildren are taken to the countryside by bus and encouraged to paint and observe Tollins in their natural habitats. Tollins: Explosive Tales for Children was her first illustrated book.

Lizzy's abstract paintings of Tollins are much sought after whenever they appear at Sotheby's auction house, and she is very active in promoting Tollin rights and registering them as a protected wetland species—or as a dryland species, if the weather's been good.

Conn and Lizzy's first book together, Tollins: Explosive Tales for Children, was published in 2009 to great critical acclaim—and has ensured that no one will ever mistake a Tollin for a fairy again.

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The Dangerous Book of Heroes 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
The 36 biographical shorts are entertaining and insightful, but limited in scope as most of those highlighted are British males. There are several American entries (Washington, MLK, Helen Keller, Apollo 11, Sitting Bull, Iwo Jima and Flight 93, etc) and three other females (Cavell, Nightingale, and the SOE). Overall the selections seem reasonable though Anglo-American focused although one must question labeling heroes those who massacred their opponents with no regard for collateral damage of the innocent like Cromwell and the pirate Henry Morgan; though in fairness they do push forward the British Empire. The fun for an American audience is not rationalizing the brutality of a "hero", but in observing how British authors place their spin on United States' legendary heroes like Washington and Keller. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For those with a reasonable understanding of British and American history, many of the accounts in this book will be superficial and will not offer significant improvement in their knowlege. For those uninitiated, this is a great starting point to learn about fascinating historical figures. The sources that the authors provide at the end of each chapter will make it a great jumping off point for more in-depth discovery. However, as someone who has learned his history through the American education system, I was most fascinated by the slightly different prism through which many stories are told. The British framework from which these accounts are conveyed offers an interesting window into how our colleagues across the Atlantic differ just a little in the portrayal of many historical events. For that window alone, this was enjoyable to read.