Daniel Deronda: (George Eliot Masterpiece Collection)

Daniel Deronda: (George Eliot Masterpiece Collection)

3.6 49
by George Eliot
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Men can do nothing without the make-believe of a beginning. Even science, the strict measurer, is obliged to start with a make-believe unit, and must fix on a point in the stars' unceasing journey when his sidereal clock shall pretend that time is at Nought. His less accurate grandmother Poetry has always been understood to start in the middle; but on reflection it…  See more details below

Overview

Men can do nothing without the make-believe of a beginning. Even science, the strict measurer, is obliged to start with a make-believe unit, and must fix on a point in the stars' unceasing journey when his sidereal clock shall pretend that time is at Nought. His less accurate grandmother Poetry has always been understood to start in the middle; but on reflection it appears that her proceeding is not very different from his; since Science, too, reckons backward as well as forward, divides his unit into billions, and with his clock-finger at Nought really sets off in medias res. No retrospect will take us to the true beginning; and whether our prologue be in heaven or on earth, it is but a fraction of that all-presupposing fact with which our story sets out.
Was she beautiful or not beautiful? and what was the secret of form or expression which gave the dynamic quality to her glance? Was the good or the evil genius dominant in those beams? Probably the evil; else why was the effect that of unrest rather than of undisturbed charm? Why was the wish to look again felt as coercion and not as a longing in which the whole being consents?
She who raised these questions in Daniel Deronda's mind was occupied in gambling: not in the open air under a southern sky, tossing coppers on a ruined wall, with rags about her limbs; but in one of those splendid resorts which the enlightenment of ages has prepared for the same species of pleasure at a heavy cost of gilt mouldings, dark-toned color and chubby nudities, all correspondingly heavy-forming a suitable condenser for human breath belonging, in great part, to the highest fashion, and not easily procurable to be breathed in elsewhere in the like proportion, at least by persons of little fashion.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781499613520
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
05/19/2014
Pages:
324
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.68(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Daniel Deronda (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I do not know anyone who has ever read this book and had never heard of it, but what an unexpected surprise it was. I had a hard time putting it down. Follows the lives of two main characters - Gwendolyn - who reminded me of Scarlett O'Hara and Deronda- a man with a good and genuine heart. There is also the pompous Grandcourt character you just want to punch! Great plot - will keep the pages turning. Only negative (which can easily be skipped through without missing anything)was that some of the religious philosophy of Mordecai was a bit too wordy for me. However, you will not be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I consider myself a fan of the nineteenth century British novel, but never have I read one as unputdownable as Daniel Deronda. Eliot mangages to craft a novel with texture as rich and complex as a Flemish tapestry, without ever slackening the pace of a riveting story. In Deronda himself she creates a hero whose unimpeachable moral integrity is balanced by a touching personal vulnerability. None of her characters, down to the members of Society who attend the balls and soirees to utter one line and be forgotten, are flat. I found Daniel Deronda to be a brilliant, evocative book, and a hugely satisfying read.
blkeyesuzi More than 1 year ago
Give yourself an opportunity to read a true classic and escape into a completely different time and place. Victorian England lays the stage as two major dramas unfold. Follow strong-willed Gwendolyn as she learns what it is that her heart really desires when she is forced to make a life-changing decision, thus realizing she is stronger than she ever imagined. Meanwhile Daniel Deronda saves a young woman from drowning and finds himself trying to unlock the mystery of her past and becomes all the more intrigued with her and the truths he uncovers. Daniel's search for truth about her past may ultimately bring him closer to knowledge of himself...Is he willing to change who he has believed himself to be all this time? I love a novel that is smart and well thought-out. No wonder this one is a classic! Beautifully rich characters. Great story!!! LOVED IT!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great writer's moral passion embraces the Zionist cause in this complex and intricate novel.If not her greatest work certainly one worth careful reading and study.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a moving, riviting, and spiritual thing. It has everything anyone is looking for in a good read. If you like the book,...buy the movie!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ivy~~Ferns then tries to rember where the book is and utterly fails. (All my searched got dleted during my absense.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Thank thee, thy Majesty." When she was seated, she held the reigns. "Care to ride alongside me? Or is thy Highness to busy in courting the Princess Snow?" Her eyes held a teasing gleam.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
popeyeswench More than 1 year ago
Daniel Deronda is immensely quotable with such lines as, “I think I dislike what I don't like more than I like what I like.” And, “Ignorance gives one a large range of probabilities.” And, “I shall never love anybody. I can't love people. I hate them.” The aristocracy are great in Eliot’s hand.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I made it through all the scanning errors and - end of part one...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrible digital transfer
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Overall, an enjoyable read, and quite different from anything that I've read from the Victorian era. But first a word of caution, Eliot's writing tends to be extremely dense, and if you're looking for a fast and easy read, this is not it. Eliot may spend pages on the inner thoughts of her characters, and many readers of more contemporary fiction would find it quite dry. I'm not going to lie, I myself do prefer the more jaunty and colorful writings of authors like Dickens, but hers are far from meritless, and this book left me feeling far more intellectually satisfied, than say, after I read the works of my favourite, Dickens. This book played with my affection throughout its course. I did find Gwendolen marvelously wicked and clever in the beginning and (I hate to say it) reminded me quite a bit of myself, headstrong and determined that the world moves only for me. Though toward the end, I started to find her contriteness and moral idolization of Daniel a little annoying and repetitive. But I suppose what makes her a great character is her varying degrees of contriteness and self absorption, for after all, she did feel disgusted with her own self-centeredness. On the other hand, I would have enjoyed the book far more if the character of Daniel was a little less stoic and, like Gwendolen, possessed varying levels of good and bad, instead of being always so very morally upright, forgiving, and high-minded (Oh, I want to set out and change the world! and the like). But the part of the book that I found particularly different and was the Jewish portion. It took the reader out of the genteel English drawing rooms that normally characterize Victorian fiction, and took one inside the English-Jewish subculture (England did in fact have a large Jewish population) and their domestic lives (unlike Dickens' novels that highlight a few sleazy red-headed Jewish characters). But at times Mordecai's philosophy did become a bit wearing. Therefore my feelings fluctuated throughout the book (it did get particularly enjoyable towards the end, and was not without its comic occurrences) and in the end left me not ecstatic but fully satisfied.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago