Danish Fairy Legends and Tales

Danish Fairy Legends and Tales

by Hans Christian Andersen
     
 

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Danish Fairy Legends And Tales, By H.C. Anderson. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Overview

Danish Fairy Legends And Tales, By H.C. Anderson. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290768849
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Pages:
554
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.12(d)

Read an Excerpt


THE LITTLE MERMAID. FAR out in the wide sea, where the water is blue as the loveliest corn-flower, and clear as the purest crystal, where it is so deep that very, very many church-towers must be heaped one upon another in order to reach from the lowest depth to the surface above, dwell the Mer-people. Now you must not imagine that there is nothing but sand below the water : no, indeed, far from it! Trees and plants of wondrous beauty grow there, whose stems and leaves are so light, that they are waved to and fro by the slightest motion of the water, almost as if they were living beings. Fishes, great and small, glide in and out among the branches, just as birds fly about among our trees. Where the water is deepest stands the palace of the Mer- king. The walls of this palace are of coral, and the high, pointed windows are of amber ; the roof, however, is composed of mussel-shells, which, as the billows pass over them, are continually opening and shutting. This looks exceedingly pretty, especially as each of these mussel-shells contains a number of bright, glittering pearls, one only of which would be the most costly ornament in the diadem of a king in the upper world. The Mer-king, who lived in this palace, had been for many years a widower ; his old mother managed the household affairs for him. She was, on the whole, a sensible sort of a lady, although extremely proud of her high birth and station, on which account she wore twelve oysters on her tail, whilst the other inhabitants of the sea, even those of distinction, were allowed only six. In every other respect she merited unlimited praise, especially for the affection she showed to the six little Princesses, hergrand-daughters. These were all very beautiful children ; the youngest was, however, the most lovely ; he...

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