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Dante in the Long Nineteenth Century: Nationality, Identity, and Appropriation

Overview

This collection of essays by an international group of scholars offers an account of Dante's reception in a wide range of media: visual art, literature, theatre, cinema, and music, from the late eighteenth century through to the early twentieth. It thus explores various appropriations and interpretations of his works and persona during the era of modernization in Europe, the United States, and beyond. It includes work by internationally recognized experts and a new generation of scholars in the field, and the ...

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Overview

This collection of essays by an international group of scholars offers an account of Dante's reception in a wide range of media: visual art, literature, theatre, cinema, and music, from the late eighteenth century through to the early twentieth. It thus explores various appropriations and interpretations of his works and persona during the era of modernization in Europe, the United States, and beyond. It includes work by internationally recognized experts and a new generation of scholars in the field, and the eighteen essays are grouped in sections which relate both to themes and regions. The volume begins and ends by addressing Italy's reception of the national poet, and its other main sections show how a worldwide dialogue with Dante developed in France, Britain, Germany, the United States, Ireland, India, and Turkey. The whole collection demonstrates how this dialogue explicitly or implicitly informed the construction, recovery or re-definition of cultural identity among various nations, regions and ethnic groups during the 'long nineteenth century'. It not only aims at wide coverage of the period's voices and concerns, and includes discussion of well-known writers such as Ugo Foscolo, Giosue Carducci, Mary Shelley, John Ruskin, George Eliot, Charles Eliot Norton and Ralph Waldo Emerson - along with a large number of significant but less familiar figures. It also emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary and multilingual approach to the subject of Dante and nineteenth-century nationalism, and it will thus be of interest to scholars and students in comparative literary and nineteenth-century studies, as well as to those with a general interest in cultural studies and the history of ideas.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Readable and fascinating throughout, this book is indispensable for those interested in Dante, comparative literature, and interdisciplinary cultural studies...Highly recommended." —Choice

"This important book must be viewed as essential not just to students of Dante, but to anyone interested in the development of the nation-states of Europe." —Sun News Network

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199584628
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 5/4/2012
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Aida Audeh is Associate Professor of Art History and Chair of the Department of Studio Arts & Art History at Hamline University, Minnesota. She has published widely on French artists' interest in Dante in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with articles appearing in such publications as Annali d'Italianistica, Dante Studies, Studies in Medievalism, and the Journal of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford University. She is a contributing author to Dante in the Nineteenth Century: Reception, Portrayal, Popularization (Bern: Peter Lang) and to Dante in France (Florence: Le Lettere.

Nick Havely is Professor of English & Related Literature at the University of York, UK. His main research interests are in late medieval literature and in Anglo-Italian literary relations. His earlier books included Chaucer's Boccaccio: Sources for Troilus and the Knight's and Franklin's Tales (an anthology of translations, 1980, 2nd edition 1992); and editions of The House of Fame (1994) and Chaucer's Dream Poetry (1997). His work on Dante and his reception includes a number of recent books: Dante's Modern Afterlife: Reception and Response from Blake to Heaney (1998); Dante and the Franciscans: Poverty and the Papacy in the 'Commedia' (2004, reissued in paperback by Cambridge University Press in 2008); the Dante volume in the Blackwell Guides to Literature series (2007). He is also currently working on a study of Dante in the English-Speaking World, from the Fourteenth Century to the Present which is contracted with Oxford University Press.

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Table of Contents

List of Plates
Acknowledgments
Notes on the Contributors
Introduction, Aida Audeh and Nick Havely
1. Risorgimento: Italian Nationality and Identity
'Founders of Italian Literature': Dante, Petrarch. and National Identity in Ugo Foscolo, Joseph Luzzi
Politics vs. Literature - The Myth of Dante and the Italian National Identity, Stefano Jossa
Dante and the Creation of the poeta vate in Nineteenth-Century Italy, Antonella Braida
Reading Dante in Nineteenth-Century Italy, Beatrice Arduini
'The Holy Stone where Dante Sat': Memory and Oblivion, Graham Smith
Politics and Performance: Gustavo Modena's dantate, Michael Caesar and Nick Havely
2. National Interests and Appropriations
Dufau's La Mort d'Ugolin: Dante, Nationalism, and French Art, c.1800, Aida Audeh
Dante and Fabre D'Olivet: the Pilgrim Romeo and the Construction of an Occitan Chant Royal, James Thomas
Dante and British Romantic Women Writers: Writing the Nation, Defining National Culture, Diego Saglia
Dante's Beatrice and Victorian Gender Ideology, Julia Straub
3. Emerging Powers
Dante's Long Road to the German Library: Literary Reception from Early Romanticism to the Late Nineteenth Century, Eva Holter
Charles Eliot Norton and the Rationale for American Dante Studies, Christian Y. Dupont
Emerson, Dante, and American Nationalism, Kathleen Verduin
Dante Abolitionist and Nationalist in the Nineteenth Century: The Case of Cordelia Ray, Dennis Looney
4. Recovering/ Re-defining Identities
Lord Charlemont's Dante and Irish Culture: A Whig interpretation of Dante at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century, George Talbot
Dante and the Bengali Renaissance, Brenda Deen Schildgen
The Reception of Dante in Turkey through the Long Nineteenth Century, Cuneyd Okay
Epilogue: Dante and Early Italian Cinema
The 1911 Milano-Films Inferno and Italian Nationalism, Nick Havely
Appendix
Dante and Nineteenth-Century Music (listing and selective bibliography), Maria Ann Roglieri
Index

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