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Dante's the Divine Comedy I: Inferno
     

Dante's the Divine Comedy I: Inferno

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by Anita Price Davis, Anita Price Davis
 

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REA's MAXnotes for Dante's The Divine Comedy I: Inferno

MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought

Overview

REA's MAXnotes for Dante's The Divine Comedy I: Inferno

MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions.

MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work's historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each chapter is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780878919918
Publisher:
Research & Education Association
Publication date:
10/28/1995
Series:
MAXnotes Literature Guides
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
5.26(w) x 8.26(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

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Dante's the Divine Comedy I: Inferno 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've just read through the first few pages and it states that the Trojan Horse was in Homer's Iliad, but the Trojan horse was not mentioned in The Iliad at all. Homer only made reference to it in The Odyssey very briefly. How can this be a book to use for academic study? I'm simply reading Dante for pleasure and wanted some assistance getting into the work, thankfully; if I was reading it for some school assignment and leaned on this book for understanding, woe unto me.