Darcy's Passions: Pride and Prejudice Retold Through His Eyes [NOOK Book]

Overview

Witty, romantic and insightful, Darcy’s Passions captures the original style and sardonic humor of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice while turning the entire story on its head. Written from the perspective of Fitzwilliam Darcy, this novel tells his version of an improbable, even obsessive relationship with a most impossible woman—Elizabeth Bennet.

This novel reveals Darcy’s passion and conviction but also his turmoil. Darcy knows that duty to ...
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Darcy's Passions: Pride and Prejudice Retold Through His Eyes

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Overview

Witty, romantic and insightful, Darcy’s Passions captures the original style and sardonic humor of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice while turning the entire story on its head. Written from the perspective of Fitzwilliam Darcy, this novel tells his version of an improbable, even obsessive relationship with a most impossible woman—Elizabeth Bennet.

This novel reveals Darcy’s passion and conviction but also his turmoil. Darcy knows that duty to family and estate demands he choose a woman of refined tastes. Yet, what his mind tells him to do and what his heart knows to be true tear him in opposite directions. He loves a woman he first denies for being unworthy, but it is he who is found wanting when Elizabeth Bennet refuses his proposal of marriage. Devastated, Darcy must search his soul and transform himself into the man she can love and respect.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781569752463
  • Publisher: Ulysses Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 236
  • Sales rank: 217,880
  • File size: 467 KB

Meet the Author

Regina Jeffers is a veteran of the English classroom and Jane Austen enthusiast. A Time Warner Star Teacher and Martha Holden Jennings Scholar, Jeffers often serves as a language arts consultant.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 56 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(28)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(0)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 20, 2009

    Giving Darcy a heart

    This book surprised me in that it gave Mr. Darcy much more of a heart than I had imagined from just reading Pride & Prejudice. It detailed his torment and his undying desire to please Elizabeth Bennett. It took a weird turn toward the end as it became almost "romance" novel-esque. It's a good book for people who want character closure.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 18, 2009

    Please Continue the story

    Please continue the story line you have down pact I didn't want to put down the book I love what you did with the charaters

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2009

    Dramatic Retelling of a Classic

    Jeffers offers her readers a look at a classic from the eyes of Fitzwilliam Darcy. She remains true to the Jane Austen story line, but adds a depth not found in many retellings, which tend to make Darcy into some sort of a "rake." It is obvious that the author loves this story as much as anyone who considers himself a Jane Austen reader. Jeffers captures the haughtiness, but also the tenderness we suspect exist in Darcy's character. She gives him a personality; something we do not see in the original, where Darcy is simply a foil to Elizabeth Bennet through much of the work. I thought it was important that Jeffers did not allow Darcy to be "passionate" in lurid ways. He is the typical "still waters run deep" character we always imagined him to be. Jeffers has a sequel to this one entitled Darcy's Dreams (but being released on Sept. 1 as Darcy's Temptations). She continues this story line, but allows the reader to go back and see the process Darcy goes through in order to love Elizabeth Bennet completely.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2009

    A pleasant surprise... At First

    When I first picked up this book, I was skeptical as I always am of Pride and Prejudice sequels. But as I read the familiar scenes from Fitzwilliam Darcy's point of view, I was pleasantly surprised to find the dialogue, and characters very faithful to Jane Austen's original book. However, after the point in the book where Elizabeth has accepted Darcy's proposal, I saw many divergences in the charaters' attitudes, especially Elizabeth's. Instead of the strong, independent character I was first introduced to, she became far too dependent on Fitzwilliam, and something about it just errked me.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A well-designed sequel to a classic

    The author follows the story line of the original Austen piece, only she tells it from Darcy's point of view. What was he thinking when he first set eyes on Elizabeth? What about her disheveled look when she walks the 3 miles to Netherfield? How would he feel about introducing Elizabeth to Georgiana? What did he hope to accomplish when he saved Lydia and helped Wickham? The author answers all those questions. She even takes it past the second proposal to the early courtship, the wedding, and the first few months of marriage. She sees Darcy as I do - a gentle but passionate lover. After all, that concept is why so many women fall in love with the original P&P. The tall, dark, brooding hero - we are all a sucker for him. In the original, we know so little about Darcy's motivations. Jeffers says he is passionate about 3 things: Elizabeth, Georgiana, and Pemberley. Those are the "passions" in the title. I enjoyed this retelling because Darcy had some depth to his character. At times, one can tell the author is a former school teacher because within the dialogue she explains some of the "rules" of Regency England that people who do not read this type of genre do not get, but she embeds it within the story itself. I enjoyed this book and plan to read the sequel. I have attached the sequel to the recommendation for others to see if they are interested.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful Point of View

    This re-telling of Pride and Prejudice through Mr. Darcy's eyes is absolutely wonderful. It doesn't change the original story at all, it flows along with Pride and Prejudice, and it gives us the juicy parts about what Mr. Darcy may have been doing and thinking while we read about Elizabeth Bennett in the original story. Mr. Darcy is shown to have true emotions, albeit still proud, but very much lovable.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    A Great Rainy Day Book

    I love when a story is told from another character's point of view! This book did not let me down. A light read that was fun on a rainy weekend!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2009

    Well done.

    I enjoyed this perspective very much. It was obvious that the author took great care in staying in Jane Austen's style. Very enjoyable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    P&P Redux from Darcy's Perspective...and then some!

    In this retelling of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, we see the famous story from Mr. Darcy's Perspective.

    Fitzwilliam Darcy arrives in Hertfordshire with his best friend Mr. Bingley to assist him with his new estate Netherfield Park convinced that the locals will be bumpkins, and SO below his notice. He attends the local Assembly dance where his predictions prove true; even the reputed local beauty Elizabeth Bennet is only tolerable, and not handsome enough to tempt him. And so on it goes; the same story that we all know and love. Their courtship lasts a little over a year and in that time we experience all the misapprehensions and conflicts that define their relationship. All told they are only together three out the twelve months, so what did Darcy do in the in-between time, especially after his rejected first marriage proposal and their renewed acquaintance at Pemberley? What transpired in his mind that so changed him that he was a different man when they meet again? Now we do not have to guess at the answers any longer as they have been neatly explained for us like a Sparks Notes re-telling of Pride and Prejudice as author Regina Jeffers literally walks us through each important scene including complete passages of dialogue from Austen's novel framed by her reinterpretations of some of the most beautiful lines in classic literature. Ouch! If this didn't set your hair on fire, then her interjections of character motivation might just do the trick. For some readers who are experiencing this story for the first time this style of translation might be a perk, but to those Austen addicts who have read the novel or seen the movie adaptations and know the dialogue, it will be as startling as Mary Bennet's singing. Paraphrasing Austen is a sticky wicket. Why mess with a masterpiece? Either you commit to lifting lines straight from the novel and give Jane Austen half the writing credit or you don't use them at all and create your own scenes and dialogue. You can't have your cake and eat it too.

    Putting aside my puzzlement of Jeffers choice to borrow and re-phrase Austen's text, she does an excellent job of viewing the story from Mr. Darcy's perspective and focusing on the personal growth he undergoes to become a better man and win Elizabeth's love. All in all I enjoyed her Mr. Darcy very much and it was great fun to walk a mile in his big black shiny Hessian boots. But surprisingly the story does not end with Darcy's second proposal and Austen's final wrap-up. And to think that we had all assumed that Darcy and Elizabeth's transformation had been complete; her prejudices removed and his pride properly humbled. Obviously Jeffers did not agree and decided to devote the last third of the book to the honeymoon and their new life together at Pemberley. I found this choice to re-write Austen's ending and additional storyline perplexing. With this final affront to Austen genius, I needed to remember that I had not yet made "allowance enough for difference of situation and temper." Neophytes who have not experienced Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice or seen any of the many movie adaptations will enjoy this book exactly how it is written. In that light it does have its merits, though sadly because of the irritating paraphrasing I must disqualify it as my Holy Grail of Mr. Darcy paraliterature. *Sigh* Tomorrow is another day!

    Laurel Ann, Austenprose

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2008

    A little 'borrowing', perhaps?

    Just finished this book, and was amazed at how many situations and 'conversations' were blatantly 'borrowed' from Darcy and Elizabeth by Linda Berdoll (the bathtub scene, 'I will always come for you', the first ascent of the Pemberley staircase, etc). Also disappointing was the inconsistent conversation style - some reminiscent of Jane Austen, but some very modern. Poor performance from an award-winning teacher.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2014

    Enjoyed

    I enjoyed this book. The writing was done very well. The main complaint I have is the awful editing. Did the editor even read this? There was a lot of repetition toward the end and their bemouning their mistakes over and over and over did get quite trying!! But it was a good book and would recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    Story is fair, but writing errors are distracting

    The srory is better than many of the Austen sequels, but serious readers who demand good writing technique will gnash their teeth. The author's poor syntax, grammar, and punctuation will try your patience and ultimately detract from what is a decent retelling of the tale. In particular, the author seems to harbor hostility toward the past perfect tense and the use of "that" when its use would clarify the prose. There was even a failure to use the word "piqued" ("peaked" was incorrectly substituted), but there was a later correct use of "pique." I'm at a loss to determine how any decent editor could miss these mistakes. Perhaps this author should hire a better editor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Love this book and it is offically on the TOP 10

    This was a very well written book and fit the original book perfectly. Mr. Darcy's character was very well portrayed and you can see as the book progresses how his points of view changes from being prideful and concieted to a person that was worthy of Elizabeth. The character interactions were at times very comical and heart felt. There are many remakes and twists on the original P&P but I really like how this one captured the characters. I can't wait to give this to my friends to read!

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  • Posted August 6, 2011

    Amazing,Awesome,the BEST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I luv luv luv this book!!!!!!!! I just could't get in to P and P and then jane wrote this book! Its nice to know Darcy's story. Its funny how much Darcy likes Elizabeth and how she teases him! I was so happy that they got togather towords the end and I luv the end too! Luv the romance too! Great book keep u up late!!!!!!!!!!! =]

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  • Posted July 29, 2011

    AMAZING, WONDERFUL, BEAUTIFUL.......

    The list of good things could go on and on. And it still wouldn't be described completely.

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  • Posted July 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Read

    I really liked this book. I had started reading Pride and Prejudice and I just couldn't get into it but this book was an easy read and kept me interested. The end is kind of repetitive but other than that I reccommend it.

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  • Posted March 30, 2011

    Terrific book!

    I couldn't put it down...sat up until 3:30 a.m. reading! Jeffers' writing style seamlessly transitions from Austin's P & P. The characters are well developed, and the plot is well thought out. This book could truly be called a sequel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

    which darcy book do I start with

    I want to start reading regina jeffers darcys passion, dreams, temptation & vampire temptations. But which book do I start with ? And how many are there? is there an order of which is book 1,2,3 etc. ? I would greatly appreciate a response. Thanks.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Jane Austen's Classic told through new eyes

    Darcy's Passions by Regina Jeffers is told through Darcy's eys. Had Jane Austen writtne P&P from Darcy's point of view I believe she would have written it like Regina Jeffers did. She paints pictures the way Jane Austen did. From the moment that Darct meets Elizabeth Bennet, she infects his mind. No matter how many times Darcy says he is going to "quit" Elizabeth, he just can't seem to get over her.

    Darcy's Passions gives more incite to Darcy's relationship with his cousin Anne. You find out that while talking to Darcy, that like Darcy, Anne does not want to marry Darcy either. Turns out she has been avoinding him because she is afraid that Lady Catherine will see this as a sign of Anne and Darcy marrying. Anne is finally able to tell Darcy how she really feels with the help of Colonel Fitzwilliam.

    While Darcy is at Rosings he not only begins to see Elizabeth Bennet in a new light but he also begins to see his cousin Anne in a new light. Regina Jeffers allows Anne to have a voice in what happend to her, that Jane Austen didn't.

    The Moment that Darcy finally admits to himself that he does love Elizabeth, you want to cheer on the inside yet you also want to cry because you know what is about to happen with Elizabeth and him. Darcy and Elizabeth share private walks on the grounds at Rosings, he even takes Elizabeth to a favorite spot of his mothers.

    It is after he loses Elizabeth, for what he assumes is forever, that he now realizes what he did to Bingley was not to save Bingley from Jane but to save himself from Elizabeth. Darcy and Elizabeth reunite at Pemeberley, it is here that we see Darcy is a changed man. He realizes that no matter what happens with Elizabeth he must have her in his life. Everything is going well, until Elizabeth recieves a letter from home about Lydia and Wickham. It is upon hearing this news that darcy decides to go to London to find them.

    Two characters that play an important role in Darcy professing his love for Elizabeth the second time are: Georgiana and Colonel Fitzwilliam.

    Regina Jeffers does a great job on retelling Jane Austen's classic, only this time from Darcy's point of view. This story is told from a narrative point of view. You can almost sse darcy and Elizabeth as the story unfolds. You feel as as if you are there with them on the grounds at Rosings and Pemberley. This is one that I will read over and over again.

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  • Posted September 19, 2009

    Great for when you don't want to leave Pemberly

    Regina Jeffers did a truly amazing job of getting into the heads of these characters so that she could fill us in on the stories that were implied or suggested but not explored by Austen. The language isn' quite as perfect as Austen's turn of a phrase, but the emotions and the understanding of the characters let you continue to love Darcy, Elizabeth, Jane, and the rest just as much as the original.

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